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SOTW: National WWII Museum Student Essay Contest

by Suada Kolovic

This year, The National WWII Museum asks: How can people who disagree still work together for victory?

In order to fight – and ultimately win – WWII, the United States allied itself with countries it had political, economic and strategic disagreements with – both small and large. On the Home Front disagreements existed between politicians of different parties, between workers and factory owners, and between racial groups. Most times (but not always) we were able to put aside these differences for the greater good.

For your essay, think about the United States today – both the country as a whole and your city, school and even your family. You will see differences of opinion on a variety of subjects – both small and large. Examine these differences along with our common goals to answer the question: How can people who disagree still work together to solve a problem? Use WWII as a starting point and base your essay in part on America’s involvement in WWII. But don’t stop in the past. Use specific examples from your own experiences that support your ideas. This is not a research paper. Your essay will be judged foremost for its originality, clarity of expression, and adherence to contest theme, as well as its historical accuracy, grammar, spelling, and punctuation. The National WWII Museum staff will read and evaluate entries.

The National WWII Museum is accepting entries through March 29th. If you are interested in learning more about this or other scholarship opportunities, conduct a free scholarship search today!


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Meet Scholarships.com's Virtual Interns: Katlyn Clark

by Katlyn Clark

Ever since I entered high school, I knew that college was in my future. I also had my career path planned as early as ninth grade: I always liked to write and given my interest in celebrity news and trends, a career as an entertainment journalist seemed like the perfect fit!

While I had my career decided, I was far less certain of the school that would get me there. I could not see myself going to any public schools in North Carolina and I was quick to look at the pretty private schools. Campbell University was in my top five but not high on the list until I went on a campus visit...but I left Campbell crying because I did not think my decision would be this hard! I ended up choosing Campbell because I loved the small campus feel, their campus ministries and the school paper. What I looked for in a school is all a reality now and I love it – I could not imagine myself anywhere else! I am now in my second semester and am taking advantage of all the campus has to offer, especially the ministries and the Campbell Times, where I work as a reporter.

I learned of the opportunity to become a virtual intern for Scholarships.com through an email over Christmas break. I thought it wouldn’t hurt to apply and to see where it would take me. I like to write about my college experiences through my own personal blog so when I heard that I was chosen to become a virtual intern, I was excited to know that others would hear my story!


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Meet Scholarships.com's Virtual Interns: Mike Sheffey

by Mike Sheffey

Hey readers! My name is Mike Sheffey and for this first post I figured I’d let you guys get to know me! I’m a junior at Wofford College in Spartanburg, South Carolina but grew up in Greensboro, North Carolina. Music and technology interest me more than anything else so it shouldn’t surprise you that I’m a computer science major...but I’m also a Spanish major and recently spent a semester abroad in Chile – an experience I’ll never forget. I love writing music, skating, photography and all things computer.

At Wofford, I’m involved mainly in Spanish-related events and volunteering in the community at Arcadia Elementary’s afterschool program. I’ve considered teaching but right, now my focus is music and tech. And speaking of tech, I work at Terrier Vision at WoCo (a name for Wofford I’ll be throwing around a lot) filming sports events and streaming them online. I’m also involved in the alternative/punk/DIY music scene of Greensboro and I also work for the music news blog PropertyOfZack.com. Music makes you feel like you are a part of something bigger than yourself and I love being able to be a voice in the punk community...and now the college community!

I chose to virtually intern for Scholarships.com because I know college can be a great experience but people occasionally need a reference point. It can be challenging yet super fun and the best years of your life. I plan to blog about common issues that come up throughout your college career: roommate problems, extracurricular activities, drama, sports, working/study habits, major choices and other key concerns – believe me, we’ve all been there! I’ll also be talking about some Wofford-specific events to give you all a glimpse onto this campus and into college life. In short, I promise to keep this blog fun yet informative and I cannot wait to get started!


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Four College Majors to Avoid

February 7, 2013

Four College Majors to Avoid

by Suada Kolovic

With recent college graduates facing an unemployment rate of 7.8 percent and substantially lower starting salaries, we have to ask: What path should students take in order to flourish after graduation? And while there isn’t one direct route that translates into success, Georgetown University’s Center on Education has compiled a list of majors that college students should avoid:

  • Liberal Arts (Unemployment Rate for Recent College Graduates 9.2 percent): Studying a broad palette of subjects including everything from literature and philosophy to history and sociology sounds like a dream. Unfortunately, employers may not see a liberal arts degree in the same divine light as the ancient Greeks did.
  • Philosophy and Religious Studies (Unemployment Rate for Recent College Graduates 10.8 percent): With the demand for these two degrees particularly lackluster, it’s difficult to justify them as your desired majors. Susan Heathfield, a career expert and writer of About.com’s Guide to Human Resources, suggests considering a degree in communications instead.
  • Information Systems (Unemployment Rate for Recent College Graduates 11.7 percent): "I'm not exactly sure what someone would do with [an information systems] degree in the current world," Heathfield says. "In the early days, the roles of various programmers, software developers, and network administrators were more distinct, but not anymore. Now the degree to have is computer science or computer engineering."
  • Architecture (Unemployment Rate for Recent College Graduates 13.9 percent): Thanks to the massive hit the housing and commercial real estate industries took in the past decade, architecture has highest unemployment rate among the degrees examined. If you’re interested in the process of planning and designing, engineering might be a more lucrative option.

What are your thoughts on the majors that made the list? Do you agree that they should be avoided at all costs or should students be encouraged to pursue their passion regardless of potentially high employment rates? Let us know in the comments section.


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Meet Scholarships.com's Virtual Interns: Chelsea Slaughter

by Chelsea Slaughter

Hello Scholarships.com readers! My name is Chelsea Slaughter and I am a junior at Jacksonville State University in Jacksonville, AL. I am majoring in public relations with a minor in art. I did not start off as a public relations major, however: I started off as a graphic design major. I love art and I just knew that it was what I wanted to do with my life after college but as it turned out, I was wrong.

Ever have a hobby that you loved to do in your free time and then you’re forced to do it and it becomes a chore? Well, that’s what happened with me. I didn’t want to draw or design for fun anymore so during the second semester of my freshman year, I decided to change to public relations. I had been doing music promotions on a street team and realized I was really good at it and I made my minor art because I still have passion for it. College is all about learning more about yourself and what suits you. I am very happy I decided to change my major as early as I did!

In my spare time, I enjoy the simple things. I make jewelry, hang with my friends and family and I’m an avid concertgoer, often traveling to see some of my favorite artists perform. I’m very active on campus, maintain a job as a resident assistant and am a member of organizations such as NAACP and Public Relations Organization. As an RA in a freshman dorm, I see first-hand the difficulties that incoming freshmen have to deal with. This is why I wanted to be a Scholarships.com virtual intern: I have gone through the same things and have learned from them. From my experience and knowledge, I feel like I can help many college students facing similar obstacles.


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Meet Scholarships.com's Virtual Interns: Carly Gerber

by Carly Gerber

Hello readers! My name is Carly Gerber and I’m the newest member of Scholarships.com's virtual intern team!

I was born and raised in Highland Park, Ill., which is a suburb 30 minutes north of Chicago. I knew I wanted to find my future employment in Chicago and that is why I picked the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign for my undergrad education; I am, however, in the middle of transferring universities so I’ll keep you all posted on where this adventure takes me and why I picked my new school!

I am currently studying elementary education at U of I but my new goal is to pursue journalism because I love learning and sharing new information. In my spare time, I enjoy being with my family and friends, watching anything on HBO or Showtime and blogging about fashion. I joined the Scholarships.com virtual intern team so that I could help make life less stressful for college students because, let’s be honest, college is a stressful time! My goal as a virtual intern is to help someone in some way and to be honest – be sure to let me know how I’m doing in the comments section!


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Changes to 529 Savings Plans

February 5, 2013

Changes to 529 Savings Plans

by Suada Kolovic

Figuring out how you’re going to pay for your college education can be intimidating. No one wants to pay off student loans for the rest of their lives, full-tuition scholarships are rare and federal student aid seldom covers all college costs but if you’re lucky enough to have a parent or relative willing to help curb the financial strains, it’s important to note that college savings plans are becoming increasingly flexible and affordable. Here are some of the changes to the 529 savings plans for 2013:

  • Increase gift tax exemptions: Grandparents can gift $14,000 annually before they’re charged a gift tax. Since five years of the exempted amount can be gifted at one time, that’s a five-year donation of $70,000 per grandchild while a married couple could potentially gift $140,000, provided they don’t give additional funds to the same grandchild in the five-year span.
  • Expanded qualified expenses: Last year, families couldn’t use 529 plan funds for laptops, iPads, internet service and software but the IRS is going high tech and realizes these are necessary items for higher education. Parents of a student who receives a full or partial scholarship can now use the funds to enhance their child’s educational experience.
  • Declining plan prices: Competitive bidding among plan management companies to run 529 plans on behalf of states is contributing to the trend of downward pricing. (For more information about 529 plans, click here.)

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SOTW: Religious Liberty Essay Scholarship Contest

by Suada Kolovic

The Religious Liberty Essay Scholarship Contest is open to all high school juniors and seniors. To enter, write an essay of 800 to 1,200 words addressing the following topic:

The United States of America was religiously diverse at its founding. Its population included numerous Protestant groups, small Catholic and Jewish populations, those who practiced traditional Native American religions as well as those who practiced African religions. The United States has become even more religiously diverse, yet Christianity has remained the majority faith tradition since the country’s beginnings. Today, some Americans assert that the country was founded as a “Christian nation” while others contend that statement is a myth.

Using the Constitution and writings of the Founders, research and evaluate the claim that the United States was founded as a “Christian nation.” Include a discussion of the current implications for religious freedom for all people in a democratic country in which the majority rules in elections and ballot initiatives.

For more information on this scholarship and other scholarship opportunities, conduct a free scholarship search today!


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