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Oregon Students’ Nutty (and Delicious) Idea

Non-Business Majors Find Success with Peanut Butter Start-Up

May 10, 2011

Oregon Students’ Nutty (and Delicious) Idea

by Alexis Mattera

When dining halls are closed and hunger strikes, college students with limited funds find some pretty creative ways to prevent their stomach growls from waking their roommates. However, this is the most interesting way I’ve heard yet...not to mention the most lucrative and delicious.

University of Oregon students Keeley Tillotson and Erika Welsh found themselves in a quandary this past January when they ran out of peanut butter but instead of heading to the store for a jar, the pair threw some whole peanuts and other pantry items (raisins, chocolate and cinnamon) into their food processor. When the mixture elicited mmmmmmms instead of ewwwwwwws from friends, Tillotson and Welsh launched Flying Squirrel Peanut Butter into the universe. And it looks like it’s sticking around.

Tillotson, a journalism major, and Welsh, an environmental studies and Spanish major, claim they didn’t set out to create a business – “We’re filling a niche we didn’t know existed,” Tillotson said; adds Welsh, “We have so much faith in our product.” – but now their plans include full-fledged careers after college filled with cafés, ice creams and additional flavors of their signature product.

Have an equally creative idea that’s yet to take flight? Let Tillotson and Welsh be your inspiration! Learn more about Flying Squirrel here, here and here; just try not to drool on your keyboard.

P.S. I’m totally ordering some.


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What’s So Special About Specialized Majors?

Narrowing Your Focus is Both Risky and Rewarding

May 11, 2011

What’s So Special About Specialized Majors?

by Alexis Mattera

Starting college with a specific idea what you want to do with your life can make choosing a major, selecting classes and finding internships much easier than the decisions facing your undecided roommate. But is that specificity better? The answer is yes...and no. Well, actually, it’s a maybe.

With the increasing demand for expertise in narrow fields, some schools are putting programs in place to produce candidates perfectly suited for these niche jobs. SUNY at Albany, for example, has opened a College of Nanoscale Science to meet what The National Science Foundation estimates will be about 2 million workers with nanotechnology-centric backgrounds needed by 2014. The results so far are promising – even first-year students have already been offered summer internships with companies like Intel and IBM – but is this kind of specialization always wise?

To an extent, but career counselors, hiring consultants and academic officials think it’s more important for students to diversify their undergraduate years. Industry-specific skill sets may get a graduate into their chosen field faster but may severely limit career flexibility down the line. You may think you know your ideal career path but wait until you’ve taken a wide enough variety of classes to be sure...especially when employers report they value soft skills like effective communication, critical thinking and problem solving over precise training.

What do you think? Should you specialize right away or sample what your school has to offer before making a potentially life-changing decision?


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Meet Scholarships.com’s Virtual Interns: Katie Askew

by Katie Askew

Hi! My name is Katie Askew...one of Scholarships.com’s newest virtual interns!

I’m originally from Sioux Falls, South Dakota, but escaped the tedious suburban life for Minneapolis, Minnesota – in fact, I just finished my freshman year at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities last week! I chose the U of M not only because it’s a Big Ten school with a fantastic reputation, but also because it has an enormous campus spread across two major cities and a selective admission process. Life in the Twin Cities is never dull, that’s for sure: The 60,000 other undergrads and myself thrive in the vibrant center of museums, theaters, concerts, clubs and mouthwatering local restaurants...not to mention the plethora of other eventful happenings on campus.

As a double major in journalism and English, being part of the high-ranking and highly-selective School of Journalism and Mass Communication is also a key part to attending the U of M for me. I chose these majors because I devour books like candy but also have a passion for writing. I debated majoring in music performance as well, but settled on the fact that I can still teach and perform music without the degree.

To feed my musical hunger, I instruct an indoor high school winter drumline in a nearby suburb. It’s quite the time commitment but the rewards pay off in the end – and it’s something I love! Percussion is my passion and I never want to give that up.

On campus, I work as an assistant to the Director of Admissions, a position that gives me the opportunity to connect with high school students looking to come to the U of M. This is why I am so excited to be a virtual intern for Scholarships.com: It mixes my love of writing and my love for the University of Minnesota all in one. I can’t wait to share my knowledge of the college experience with you!


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Meet Scholarships.com’s Virtual Interns: Jacquelene Bennett

by Jacquelene Bennett

Hey yo! I am Jacquelene Bennett and come September, I will be a senior at the University of Redlands. I am double majoring in creative writing and government as well as minoring in religious studies – a lot of work, I know but as an aspiring writer/political journalist, I have found these subjects to be the most important and demanding issues in today’s world. Plus, these subjects (and the classes that accompany them) are intensely thought-provoking and fun; in fact, last semester, I wrote a short story about Marilyn Monroe for my fiction workshop!

I chose the University of Redlands mainly for its location. Born and raised in Southern California, I wanted to go to a school that was both close to home but far away enough that I could have a true “college experience.” Also, the U of R is in the heart of SoCal, so I am literally just an hour away (actual timing really depends on traffic here) from Los Angeles, San Diego, Disneyland, the Santa Monica Pier and Joshua Tree National Park. Since I began attending school, however, I have found the campus itself to be a treasure trove of beautiful scenery, fun events and wonderful people. True story: The U of R is one of only three California universities to be named a “Tree Campus” by the Arbor Day Foundation.

As I find myself getting closer and closer to graduation, I find that I have less and less spare time but in the rare moments that I am free, I like to listen to music, catch up on celebrity gossip and eat gummy bears and Fruit Gushers. Also, I like to say "cool beans."

From my freshman year up until now, I have built a repertoire of college knowledge and experiences just hoping that I would one day have the opportunity to share it with other people of the world. Well, it looks like that day has come and I am psyched!


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Meet Scholarships.com’s Virtual Interns: Angela Andaloro

by Angela Andaloro

Hi everyone! My name is Angela and I’ve just completed my sophomore year at Pace University’s New York City campus, where I double major in communication studies and English. I can’t believe I’m already halfway through college; I’ve learned so much in the past two years that high school seems like a totally different world ago. College was far from what I expected, but I’m definitely enjoying it nonetheless.

Becoming a virtual intern here at Scholarships.com is one of the most exciting things to happen to me recently. As my choices in majors might indicate, I love writing and think there’s so much importance to communicating feelings and sharing experiences. That’s what I hope to do through this opportunity: share my feelings and experiences about college life and the many things that go along with being a college student.

Like most things in New York City, I find my life and my college experience to be far from typical. I’m a commuter student, I took nearly a semester’s worth of classes online and I picked up my second major despite early graduation being a very real possibility for me. Still, I think there are many things that do connect me to your “average” college student: I like to hang out with my friends, go to parties, and yes, I’m addicted to social networking.

Combining my unique college experiences with my more common ones, I hope to be able to share something useful with everyone. I’d also love to hear from some of the readers of the Scholarships.com blog too, so feel free to say hi in the comments! After all, college is all about networking and it never hurts to get to know some awesome new people.


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Meet Scholarships.com’s Virtual Interns: Kara Coleman

by Kara Coleman

Hi! My name is Kara and I’m really excited about being one of the newest Scholarships.com virtual interns!

I have spent the past couple of years studying at Gadsden State Community College. I live at home with my parents and commute to school and work every day. I attend Gadsden State because it is affordable, close to my home and workplace and I don’t have to pay room and board expenses. I plan to transfer to Jacksonville State University for many of the same reasons: JSU offers everything involved in a “normal” college experience, like clubs and football games, but I can choose what to participate in while still meeting the demands of my work schedule and being able to watch my little brothers’ soccer games.

Ever since I could hold a pencil, I have loved to write. My dream has always been to write a New York Times bestseller but until that happens, I would like to have a job that involves writing. When I enrolled at Gadsden State, I declared myself as an English major. I took every literature class that Gadsden State had to offer and I even spent the past year tutoring English. At JSU, I intend to major in communications, with concentration in print journalism. I think that writing for a newspaper will give me a consistent day job while I write books on the side.

When I received the email stating that Scholarships.com was looking for virtual interns, I immediately began composing my writing sample. This opportunity will allow me to do what I love, add some bylines to my portfolio, and (hopefully!) give me some more exposure as a writer. I look forward to sharing my transfer experience and helpful hints with anyone who visits the site over the coming months. “Talk” to all of you soon!


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Meet Scholarships.com's Virtual Interns: Casandra Pagni

by Casandra Pagn

At 18, I was going to be a lawyer. I had the next four years of my life planned out well. I was to attend the University of Michigan, double major in political science and economics, take the LSAT, attend law school, pass the bar and go from there. I even got into arguments with my older brothers when they told me to be open-minded as I left for school. But life took a few turns — some of them sharp — between then and now.

I chose Michigan for its large campus, student diversity, and rigor in academic disciplines. Okay...I confess. At 18, I chose Michigan because of the Big Ten sports. I was ready to see national championships first hand. But as my sports expectations came crashing down, the other things that Michigan offered began to shine. I joined a sorority. I played intramural sports. I went to concerts, saw the Dalai Lama and wrote for the campus newspaper. I followed the hockey team to the Frozen Four. Oh yeah, and I studied, too! I took and enjoyed classes with incredibly passionate professors.

I can't pinpoint the exact moment I knew I was going to become a teacher, but the person I became at Michigan is a more relaxed and open-minded version of the 18-year old aspiring lawyer I once was. I am now the ecstatic recipient of a degree in English and a high school teaching certificate. I am also committed to writing whenever and wherever I can and to making real changes in the way writing is taught today.

As a recent college graduate smack-dab in the middle of a job search, I plan to combine my passion for writing with my absolute love for the college years to bring you weekly posts with tried and true advice, honest perspective and a little bit of humor along the way. As a Scholarships.com virtual intern, I'll be looking back while looking ahead.


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No Job This Summer? It’s Not As Bad As You Think!

by Darci Miller

If you’re of the age to need the services offered by Scholarships.com, you’re also most likely of the age where summer is no longer the carefree, lazy paradise it once was. Back then, it was filled with summer camp, ice cream, beach days and late nights. But now? Now it’s all about gaining work experience.

If you’ve yet to hit this point, enjoy this summer. The real world of job-hunting is coming up fast. Hours spent working on your resume and cover letter, days spent emailing companies with internship listings, weeks spent waiting (and waiting...and waiting), potentially all for naught. And then there’s all the time spent pounding the pavement for a minimum wage job, only to get turned away from all of those as well. It’s not fun. Trust me, I’ve been there.

If you’re in this situation (and if you’re anything like me), you’re tearing your hair out at the prospect of doing nothing for three months. But look at the bright side: A recent study conducted by Australian National University found that, income notwithstanding, having a bad job is worse than having no job for your mental health. So you’ll be happier doing nothing than you would be at that lame job anyway!

But that still leaves you with approximately 90 empty days to fill, right? It really is important to get experience, so don’t let the summer go to waste. Try to volunteer somewhere to keep busy and keep your spirits up – and it’ll be something great to add to your resume if you do find something related to your major!

You can also take this time to do something you don’t have time for while attending school. Read that book you’ve been eyeing, rekindle an old hobby, start a blog. But no matter your plans, be sure to make this summer a good one!

Darci Miller is a New Yorker studying journalism and sport administration at the University of Miami. When she’s not writing for the school newspaper, you can find her at the gym, either working or working out. She loves all ‘80s pop culture (the cheesier the better!), and glues herself to her TV when the Olympics are on. She dreams big, and believes the sky’s the limit!


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Meet Scholarships.com’s Virtual Interns: Lisa Lowdermilk

by Lisa Lowdermilk

Hi everyone! My name is Lisa Lowdermilk and I live in Colorado. I just completed my Associate of Arts degree and I am transferring to the University of Colorado Denver this summer. I have completed my degree entirely online and I am transferring to UC Denver because of its online writing program. I prefer online schooling to traditional schooling because I feel it’s easier to stay organized and is more flexible. And hey, who doesn’t want to attend class in their pajamas?

I am majoring in English, specifically professional writing. I love being able to express myself through words – it is such a great way of connecting with other people – so much so that I have written a book, which I am getting published next year. It has always been my dream to be a published author and, though it’s been a lot of work, the end result will be worth it. If I had to describe my book, I would say it’s a young adult murder mystery set in the future and I’m so excited that other people will be able to read it! In addition to writing, I love to play video games, especially those for Nintendo and PlayStation. My favorite TV show is “Castle” (how many other TV shows have both murder and humor?); I also loved “Ugly Betty” and was pretty upset when it was taken off the air.

I was interested in becoming a virtual intern for Scholarships.com because I know that in today’s competitive job market, employers want workers with experience. I also like the idea of being able to help other students overcome the many obstacles of attending college...sometimes I think all the forms colleges require are more tedious than college classes!

Anyway, it’s great to “e-meet” everyone. Here’s to a great semester!


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Why Unpaid Internships Are Worth It

by Angela Andaloro

Although students quickly adopt the Dollar Menu lifestyle that pricey college living sentences them to, they are always looking for ways to make few extra bucks and live a little more comfortably. Many students totally rule out the idea of working for free because of this but what they don’t realize is they are missing out on great opportunities! Here are some reasons why unpaid internships are actually well worth your time:

  • It’s great experience. Interning in the industry you’re interested in working in after college will provide you with invaluable skills – skills that can give you an edge when going for your first job. You’ll also get a first-hand idea of what a job in the industry of your choice is like; you may realize it’s not for you after all.
  • It allows you to network. As an intern, you'll meet tons of new people, from other interns to CEOs. The connections you make here are important, as these are the first people who are getting to know you in a professional setting. Down the line, one of these connections may be able to clue you in on a job opening or serve as a professional reference.
  • It shows dedication. By taking an unpaid internship, you’re showing an employer that money isn’t your top priority. Dedication to the work rather than the benefits may give you a better chance at getting your foot in the door after graduation.

The most important thing to remember about any internship is that it’s your first step into the professional world. Making a positive impression is vital and there’s no better way to do so than by giving 100 percent every minute you’re on the job. A paycheck may not be on the line but your reputation is!

Angela Andaloro is a rising junior at Pace University’s New York City campus, where she is double majoring in communication studies and English. Like most things in New York City, her life and college experience is far from typical – she commutes to school from her home in Flushing and took nearly a semester’s worth of classes online – but she still likes to hang out with friends, go to parties and feed her social networking addiction like your “average” college student.


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