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Tuition at Cooper Union?

November 1, 2011

Tuition at Cooper Union?

by Alexis Mattera

If you’re a prospective college student considering a career in engineering, architecture or art, Cooper Union is probably on your radar. Not only is the school among the most selective in the nation but the tuition – zero – has been the best deal in higher ed for more than a century...or it was.

Cooper Union President Jamshed Bharucha recently announced that the weak economy has prompted the school to reevaluate its scholarship policy and possibly begin charging tuition for the first time since 1902. Bharucha stressed that lower-income students and many middle-income ones would continue to attend for free and that none of the 900 current undergraduates would be charged but the mere mention of tuition for degree-seeking students marks a serious cultural shift for the institution: Though a final decision has yet to be made, alumni are furious – “It’s a contradiction to everything we’ve learned about Cooper. It’s the last opportunity for free education on that level in the entire country,” said graphic designer, New York magazine co-founder and Cooper Union graduate Milton Glaser – and students are planning to walk out of classes in protest tomorrow.

Bharucha did say that implementing tuition would be a last resort but what do you think of his announcement and its corresponding reaction? What avenues should be explored to preserve free tuition and are there any ways students and alumni can support or contribute to the cause? Lastly, does a potential tuition bill have you reconsidering applying to Cooper Union?

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Early Decision and Early Action Deadlines Extended

November 2, 2011

Early Decision and Early Action Deadlines Extended

by Alexis Mattera

So you took the standardized tests, filled out the application, wrote the essay and secured the appropriate transcripts and letters of recommendation well in advance in order to apply to your first-choice school early. Nice work – it’s just too bad Mother Nature had other plans.

The late October storm that hit the Northeast knocked out electricity, Internet access and, for some students, hopes of getting their early decision and early action applications submitted on time. Thankfully, many institutions have extended these deadlines beyond the traditional November 1st cutoff and NACAC has posted those schools, administrative contacts and new early application dates on its website. Though most are in the Northeast, schools located as far west as California, Oregon and Arizona and as far south as Texas, Tennessee and Kentucky have joined the cause to ensure all interested students have time to apply.

NACAC does note that the list may not be comprehensive and is inviting colleges and universities to update their application dates if they have changed. Conversely, students should contact the schools they are interested in applying to for any admissions updates. Good luck, everyone!

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Smile...You’re on Camera: WGU Uses Webcams to Monitor Online Test Takers

November 3, 2011

Smile...You’re on Camera: WGU Uses Webcams to Monitor Online Test Takers

by Alexis Mattera

For students seeking more flexibility in their college schedules, online classes are often an excellent alternative. Coursework can be done from anywhere with an Internet connection but when it comes to test taking, how do instructors know the person answering the questions is doing so honestly? Western Governors University has come up with a solution: Say cheese!

Up until a few years ago, WGU online students had to take their exams at one of the school’s 6,000 on-site assessment centers. This proved to be a burden for the majority of the student body – the average student is 36 years old, has a family and takes a full course load while working full-time – so WGU began allowing students to take exams off-site if monitored by webcams. The cameras show the student, his or her computer screen, their hands and profile and a 180-degree view of the room to ensure the student isn’t obtaining information from another source during the test. And just in case something goes awry, there is support available to assist with any technical issues.

While some students still opt to take their exams on-site, most have adopted the program with open arms: There are 30,000 WGU webcams in use and about 80 percent of the 10,000 exams per month are taken via webcam. Do you think WGU’s webcam program is beneficial to busy students as well as the school’s reputation? If given the option, would you smile for the camera or take your tests on-site?

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University of Charleston Slashes Tuition

November 4, 2011

University of Charleston Slashes Tuition

by Alexis Mattera

Between announcements of Cooper Union possibly charging tuition and the average student debt topping $25,000, news about the cost of college haven’t been too positive as of late. But lo, the University of Charleston has broken the bad news cycle: The West Virginia school has announced it will reduce tuition by 22 percent for all new students and provide additional aid for continuing students.

UC has guaranteed that no undergraduate student will pay more than $19,500 for tuition in the fall of 2012. This will be the base price for freshmen and transfer students while the figure returning students will see is $25,500 with a promise of at least $6,000 in university aid. The tuition reduction is part of a broad system redesign which the University of Charleston hopes will allow greater innovation and cost-effectiveness without compromising the quality of its education. According to a release on UC's website, these changes include “a five-year plan that emphasizes fast-track learning, achieving athletic prominence, championing innovation and expanding access.”

In a time where every dollar makes a difference, did the University of Charleston just move up on your college wish list?

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Adventures in Visa Acquisition

November 7, 2011

Adventures in Visa Acquisition

by Darci Miller

You may think your study abroad experience is going to be all fun and games but in its early stages, I’ve found that it’s anything but. While I know it’ll be more than worth it in the end, it’s a lot to handle: Not only is there paperwork for your home university but sometimes there’s also the added benefit (note the sarcasm) of applying for a visa. Here are some things I’ve learned about the process so far:

Most importantly, though, remember the stress will pay off. In a few months, you’ll be abroad and having the time of your life!

Darci Miller is a New Yorker studying journalism and sport administration at the University of Miami. When she’s not writing for the school newspaper, you can find her at the gym, either working or working out. She loves all ‘80s pop culture (the cheesier the better!), and glues herself to her TV when the Olympics are on. She dreams big, and believes the sky’s the limit!

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Stanford Receives $150 Million Gift to Fight World Poverty

November 7, 2011

Stanford Receives $150 Million Gift to Fight World Poverty

by Suada Kolovic

With the economy in a slump, debt-ridden college students aren’t alone in their financial struggles. Colleges and universities nationwide – who’ve had a fair share in creating insurmountable amounts of debt for the majority of students – have struggled to attract potential donors as concerns about volatile markets remain. Stanford University, however, may be the exception: A local philanthropist and his wife have donated $150 million to establish an institute aimed at alleviating global poverty.

The gift from Robert and Dorothy King includes a $100 million grant to start the Stanford Institute on Innovation in Developing Economies, which will be known as Seed. The new center will be housed in the business school and will conduct research, coordinate courses in social entrepreneurship and design, and oversee projects worldwide to alleviate poverty. "We know there are people out there who can make this world a better place, and we want to get behind them," Mr. King, a venture investor and philanthropist in Menlo Park, Calif., said in a YouTube video about the institute. The remaining $50 million will be set aside to encourage donations to Stanford programs that tackle poverty and, if all funds are matched, the total could reach $200 million.

What do you think of Mr. and Mrs. King’s donation to Stanford and not those in need directly? Is this a step in the right direction or not?

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Top 10 Majors That Will Get You Hired

November 9, 2011

Top 10 Majors That Will Get You Hired

by Suada Kolovic

If you’re like most college students, you expect to hear those two beautiful words that make all those sleepless nights cramming for exams the last four (possibly five) years worth it upon graduation: “You’re hired.” But with the economy in a relentless slump and the unemployment rate hovering at 9%, college students need to realize that what they choose as a major will influence their career prospects. With that being said, here are Wall Street Journal’s top 10 majors that will get you hired:

What do you think of the majors that made the list? Is your field of study listed? Do studies such as the Wall Street Journal’s influence your academic pursuits or are you unwavering in following your heart when it comes to your major?

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Ivy League Fraud Fakes Harvard Cred…Again

Harvard Scammer Jailed for Citing University on Resume

November 10, 2011

Ivy League Fraud Fakes Harvard Cred…Again

by Suada Kolovic

If you don’t remember the name Adam Wheeler, here’s a refresher: He was the Delaware student convicted of fraud for faking his way into Harvard with forged transcripts and plagiarized essays. Just last year, he was sentenced to 10 years of probation for his actions. You’d think his sensational story that garnered national attention would deter him from citing the school on a job resume…but you’d be wrong: Wheeler violated his probation by doing just that.

According to the terms of his probation, Wheeler was barred from representing himself as a Harvard student or graduate. His lawyer Steven Sussman acknowledged that Wheeler had violated that provision by stating on his resume that he had attended Harvard but said he did so because of the “financial pressure” to support himself and to pay the court-ordered restitution to the university. That “mistake” could translate into jail time, as assistant district attorney John Verner said he will ask that Wheeler be ordered to serve the remainder of his sentence – 2 years and 5 months – for violating his probation. During his sentencing hearing, Wheeler apologized and said he was “ashamed and embarrassed.”

What do you think of Wheeler’s actions? Should be serve jail time or seek counseling for being a compulsive liar?

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Looking for a Job? Utilize Facebook!

November 11, 2011

Looking for a Job? Utilize Facebook!

by Suada Kolovic

If you’re a recent college graduate, chances are you’re having a rough time finding a job. It’s nothing to be embarrassed about – times are tough and opportunities are slim – but next time you log on to a social networking site, realize this simple action could help in your job search. U.S. News and World Report has compiled the top five ways for college students (and graduates!) to use Facebook strategically to do just that:

  • Set your privacy settings appropriately: Nothing new here. I’m sure professors and parents alike have stressed the importance of blocking potentially damaging content from the public. That is solid advice but you should also take into account that there can be distinct advantages to crafting your settings to cater to a specific company, says David McDonough, director of career services at Clark University in Massachusetts. For instance, if you’re a student interested in a music company, publicly displaying your musical tastes “could be beneficial,” he notes.
  • Evaluate your profile picture: Even the highest privacy settings on Facebook won’t restrict users from seeing your profile picture; while prospective employers aren’t supposed to discriminate, they could be influenced by a photo deemed inappropriate by company standards.
  • Interact with companies: If you’re interested in a job opportunity with a specific company, you should become a fan of it on Facebook. Oriana Vogel, vice president for global recruitment and HR operations at American Express, explains, "We want them to come to us…and assess if we're the right fit for them."
  • Participate in Facebook groups: Interacting with professional groups on Facebook is a great way to network with those who share your same interests, but more importantly it puts you in direct contact with recruiters. Keep in mind that being a member isn’t enough, though – participating in group discussions is crucial.
  • Tap into your own network: "Getting a job has always been about who you know as much as anything else," Likeable Media's Kerpen says. "But the 'who you know' is multiplied by 10 from what it might have been 10 years ago thanks to Facebook." Take advantage of that fact and start messaging companies of interest as soon as possible!
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Dual Enrollment Program Doubled in Chicago

November 14, 2011

Dual Enrollment Program Doubled in Chicago

by Alexis Mattera

There’s a lot of preparation that goes into making the transition from high school to college. While some students figure this out after they set foot on campus and are overwhelmed by a litany of new responsibilities, others begin laying the groundwork even before they apply. In Chicago, public school students will have more opportunities to pursue the latter route thanks to a change in the dual enrollment plan.

Yesterday, Chicago City Colleges announced its dual enrollment program will double as of the spring semester, giving up to 2,100 qualifying Chicago Public School juniors and seniors the ability to take free college classes at seven schools – Richard J. Daley College, Kennedy-King College, Malcolm X College, Olive-Harvey College, Truman College, Harold Washington College and Wilbur Wright College. This is excellent news not only for students who have exhausted the course offerings at their high schools but also for cash-strapped students – roughly 85 percent of all CPS students come from low-income families – aiming to earn college credit while keeping their expenses in check.

CPS students, will you be taking advantage of the expanded dual enrollment program? Other public school students, is there a program like this in place in your city?

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