Skip Navigation Links

SOTW: Elk’s National Foundation Most Valuable Student Scholarship

This SOTW is Accepting Entries Through December 6th

November 18, 2013

SOTW: Elk’s National Foundation Most Valuable Student Scholarship

by Suada Kolovic

The Elks National Foundation will award 500 four-year scholarships to the highest-rated applicants in this year's competition. Ranging from $1,000 per year to $15,000 per year, Most Valuable Student scholarships are for students pursuing a four-year degree, on a full-time basis (minimum of 12 semester hours), in a U.S. American college or university.

  • Any high school senior who is a citizen of the United States is eligible to apply.
  • Applicants need not be related to a member of the Elks.
  • College students are not eligible to apply.
  • Applicants must be citizens of the United States on the date their applications are signed; resident alien status does not qualify.
  • Male and female students compete separately.

Applications for the contest are available at Elks Lodges or online. Applicants will be judged on scholarship, leadership and financial need. For more information on this award and other scholarship opportunities, conduct a free scholarship search today!

Comments

Making the Most of Your College’s Resources

September 27, 2013

Making the Most of Your College’s Resources

by Abby Egan

Navigating college can be difficult, especially when you’re just starting out. Every school runs a little differently but most have many common resources available to all students, new and seasoned.

  • In the Residence Halls: Ever wonder who puts those pretty name tags on your door? That’s your residence advisor (RA)! They’re your immediate resource in the residence halls if you lock yourself out of your room or want to get involved in your building’s community. A step up from the RAs are the residence directors (RDs), who are the head honchos of each residence building. If your RA doesn’t know the answers to your questions, it’s likely that the RD will. Make sure you know these people and how to get in contact with them because they are always available to help.
  • In the Classrooms: In your classes, your resources are a little more obvious. Your teachers are there to guide you through the courses you’re taking with them but since many professors believe in student independence, sometimes you’ve got to figure it out on your own. Connect with your peers to help each other out with homework, group projects and other assignments – it will give you a chance to make new friends and find a study partner for finals as well. Some professors have teaching assistants (TAs) who can help you in class or out of class for tutoring if you make appointments with them. It’s important to remember that you have connections in every college situation you’re in, even the hardest of classes.
  • Outside of the Classrooms: There is an abundance of resources available to students outside of the classroom that are just waiting to be utilized, such as academic advisors, librarians, info booth attendees, peer advisors, tutors, admissions tour guides and even the registrar workers. Colleges are full of helpful people who are there to make sure you have the best experience and achieve your goals while you’re enrolled. The best part about these resources is that if they can’t help you or answer your questions, then 9 times out of 10 they know who to connect you with so that you can get the help and answers you need.
  • Abby Egan is currently a junior at MCLA in the Berkshires of western Massachusetts, where she is an English Communications major with a concentration in writing and a minor in philosophy. Abby hopes to find work at a publishing company after college and someday publish some of her own work. In her spare time, Abby likes to drink copious amounts of coffee, spend all her money on adorable shoes and blog into the wee hours of the night.

Comments

SOTW: $2,000 No Essay College Scholarship

Niche is Accepting Entries Through February 28th

February 16, 2015

by Suada Kolovic

Winning money for college is great but doing so without having to meet astronomical word counts and double-digit page requirements is even better. Lucky for you, the folks at Niche couldn't agree more and have launched the $2,000 No Essay Scholarship.

The scholarship is open to all students and those planning on enrolling within 12 months. The monthly winner will be determined by random drawing and then contacted directly and announced in Niche's e-newsletter and on the Scholarship Winners page. One entry per person, but you can come back each month to try again. To apply, please visit Niche and don't forget to conduct a free scholarship search for a list of scholarships that are personalized to you!

Comments (3)

The Time is Right to Resolve to Evolve

Our Annual Essay Scholarship is Back – Apply Online Today!

July 15, 2014

by Suada Kolovic

The Resolve to Evolve Scholarship is about more than just making resolutions - it's an opportunity to proactively and progressively confront challenges, however daunting they may be. The R2E Scholarship encourages applicants to move beyond finger-pointing and offer constructive criticism and workable solutions for problems facing an administration or an organization. Ready to create change and further our evolution as individuals and as a society? Review this year’s prompts and submit your essay today!

The R2E Scholarship is open to all United States citizens who are registered users of Scholarships.com, will be enrolled in high school (grades 9 through 12) during the 2014-2015 school year and will be between the ages of 13 and 19 at the time the award is given. The applicant who submits the best overall essay will receive a $2,000 scholarship. One (1) winner will also be selected from each grade level (freshman, sophomore, junior, senior) and will receive a $1,000 scholarship each.

All entries must be submitted via Scholarships.com’s online submission form by the September 15th deadline. Finalists will be notified by mid-October for additional materials. Winners will be notified in mid-November and awarded in early December. For more information on Resolve to Evolve and other scholarship opportunities, conduct a free scholarship search today!

Comments (2)

SOTW: The Paul Revere Society’s “What Does It Mean To Be An American” Essay Contest

This SOTW is Accepting Entries Through March 31st

January 26, 2015

by Suada Kolovic

The Savage Paul Revere Society's "What Does It Mean to Be an American" Contest is designed to encourage college students enrolled in two or four-year accredited college institutions to study and promote traditional American conservative values. The essay must be approximately 500 words and express respect and love for America.

The contest is open to United States citizens who are 17 years of age or older and have been accepted to a two or four-year accredited college institution within the United States. Each Entrant must submit his or her essay electronically. To submit an essay electronically, please include the essay as a .doc attachment in an email to SavageScholarship@gmail.com with the following subject line: "Entry for Savage Paul Revere Society Essay Contest."

For more information, including complete contest rules, please click here. And if you're interested in finding additional money for college, conduct a free scholarship search today!

Comments

Win $1,000 Scholarship to "Pursue Your Passion"

This SOTW is Accepting Entries Through November 30th

November 3, 2014

by Suada Kolovic

Degreed wants to hear about your passion and your plan to pursue it.

Whether you're looking to study abroad, go to college, take an online course or attend a conference – Degreed will fund the learning opportunities you're passionate about. Why? They believe a person's education is a collection of all their learning and life experiences – not just a formal degree. They're here to level the playing field and give every individual the opportunity to continually learn, advance, and measure their true education.

Interested? All you need to do is complete the two criteria below:

  • Write a 3 Minute Essay. In 100 words, tell us how you'll use $1,000 to pursue learning that intrigues you!
  • Create a Degreed profile. Start documenting everything you are learning to demonstrate your passion, gain credit for your efforts, and ultimately measure your education. Degreed reviews all scholarship applicants' profiles; the final winner is selected by our scholarship committee and notified by email.

All US and international college students, graduate students, college graduates, and informal learners are eligible, age 18 or older are encouraged to apply. For more information on this scholarship and other scholarship opportunities, please conduct a free scholarship search!

Comments

Scholarships.com “You Like Me…You Really Like Me” Facebook Scholarship is Back!

We're Accepting Entries Through March 31st

February 13, 2015

by Suada Kolovic

We always love hearing from our users so why not let your voice be heard and potentially earn money for college in the process with Scholarships.com's "You Like Me...You Really Like Me" Facebook Scholarship! Love our scholarship search? Tell us why. Is our financial aid section really helping you out? Send us an example. Think our college prep section is the best? Give us a shout out. Awards will go to the users that are making the best use of Scholarships.com's many resources as determined by our team - impress us!

If you're new to Scholarships.com and unfamiliar with its contents, take a tour and check out everything we have to offer. Our site is teeming with info – from figuring out the puzzle that is the FAFSA and strategies for winning scholarships to living with a roommate and preparing for an internship – so if you like us (really like us), tell us why.

Step 1: “Like” Scholarships.com on Facebook.

Step 2: Post on our wall how Scholarships.com is helping you with your scholarship search. Once you do this, you are automatically entered to win a $1,000 or $200 scholarship for college.

Step 3: You may enter as many times as you want over the course of the contest but please limit your comments to one per day. You must also have a valid Scholarships.com account and adjust your Facebook privacy preferences to allow Scholarships.com to message you should you win. The Scholarships.com Team will then determine which comment best exemplifies what our site is all about and which applicant is using our resources most effectively.

Starts: February 13, 2015

Ends: March 31, 2015

Number Available: 3

Amount: $1,000 for one first-prize winner; $200 each for second- and third-place winners

For official rules, please click here. This scholarship competition is offered by Scholarships.com and is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with Facebook. For more information on finding money for college and how to properly fund your college education, check out Scholarships.com Financial Aid section and conduct a free scholarship search today!

Comments (6)

College Official Accused of Offering Scholarships for Sex

February 24, 2015

by Suada Kolovic

Securing the funds needed to attend college can be challenging. Luckily for the majority of students, they can rely on financial aid experts for guidance. Regrettably, not all students are so fortunate: An Idaho community college administrator stands accused of offering scholarships to students in exchange for sex.

Idaho police arrested Joseph Bekken, 36, the head of financial aid for North Idaho College, on suspicion of procurement of prostitution and other charges in connection with ads he posted on Craigslist offering "grant money" in exchanges for sexual favors from students who attended the two-year college in Coeur d'Alene, according to authorities. Bekken told police no federal funds were involved in his propositions and that he had not been involved with any other students. In a statement Wednesday, NIC President Joe Dunlap said the college "has worked alongside law enforcement from the very beginning of the investigation. I am grateful for the knowledge and training of our staff, which resulted in a swift and decisive response to this incident." Bekken also faces charges of bribery and using a computer in a scheme to defraud. (For the full story, head over to Reuters.)

What do you think Bekken’s penalty should be for using his position to solicit students for sex? Share your thoughts in the comments section. And don’t forget to conduct a free college scholarship search on Scholarships.com, where you’ll be matched with scholarships, grants and other financial aid opportunities that are unique to you!

Comments (78)

LGBT Students Can Face Serious Roadblocks to Financial Aid

October 31, 2013

LGBT Students Can Face Serious Roadblocks to Financial Aid

by Suada Kolovic

Unless you plan on paying for your college education out-of-pocket, completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (more commonly known as the FAFSA) is essential in your quest for financial aid. For the uninitiated, the FAFSA is used by the Department of Education to determine your eligibility for federal student financial aid for college, including the Pell Grant, federal work-student programs and federal student loans. And while most students struggle with the complicated application process, LGBT students potentially face more serious roadblocks: According to U.S. News & World Report, name changes, gender identification and strained family relationships can present unique FAFSA challenges.

In 2012, sexual orientation and gender identity were the number one reason for youth homelessness in the U.S., notes Thomas Krever, chief executive officer of the Hetrick-Martin Institute. Almost 40 percent of homeless youth identified as LGBT and of those teens, 46 percent ran away because their family rejected their sexual orientation or gender identity. What does this have to do with the FAFSA? Students under the age of 24 need tax returns and bank statements from their parents in order to file for financial aid and those without family support are left in limbo. Other LGBT students struggle with the fact that the FAFSA doesn’t necessarily reflect their identity. Questions about name and gender can be enough to keep transgender teens from even applying, says Eli Erlick, founder of Trans Student Equality Resources. "One thing about funding, specifically FAFSA, is that transgender students may not be able to change their name due to parents not being supportive or not having the money to do so," says Erlick. "This can lead to transgender students being nervous to apply, or not even applying at all, because they're scared for their own safety, because using these forms with their legal names may out them." (For more on this story, click here.)

What do you think about the challenges LGBT students face when seeking financial aid? Can you think of something the government can do to ease this pressure?

Comments

GWU Admits Considering Financial Need in Admissions

October 22, 2013

GWU Admits Considering Financial Need in Admissions

by Suada Kolovic

With so much riding on whether or not you get in, applying for college can cause even the most confident students some serious anxiety. And with so many factors to consider like high school rankings, SAT/ACT scores, GPAs and community service hours, it’s important to understand that more often than not, colleges are also factoring in a student’s ability to pay...even when they say they’re not. Insert outrage here.

Just last Friday, George Washington University’s website claimed to evaluate applicants without considering their financial need (also known as a need-blind admissions approach) but now they’re clarifying that policy: It now reads that while applications are first reviewed without consideration of need, “at the point of finalizing admissions decisions, we must balance a student’s financial resources with the university’s aid budget. This practice of being need-aware allows us to meet as much need of as many students as possible.” Why the sudden transparency, GWU? Turns out that the school’s new senior associate provost for enrollment management’s recent interview with The GW Hatchet revealed that she characterized the university’s policy as need-aware as opposed to need-blind. The problem? By being need-aware for years and suggesting otherwise, the university appears to not only have violated the Statement of Principles of Good Practice of the National Association for College Admission Counseling but encouraged low-income students to apply (and pay a hefty application fee!) on the false pretense that the university was need-blind. (For more on this story, click here.)

The ability to pay for college has long been a major factor when it comes to gaining admission but to blatantly advertise otherwise is undeniably uncool. What do you think of GWU’s current predicament? Should the university face serious repercussions? Let us know in the comments section.

Comments

Recent Posts

Tags

ACT (19)
Advanced Placement (24)
Alumni (16)
Applications (79)
Athletics (17)
Back To School (73)
Books (66)
Campus Life (453)
Career (115)
Choosing A College (51)
College (983)
College Admissions (237)
College And Society (292)
College And The Economy (368)
College Applications (143)
College Benefits (289)
College Budgets (213)
College Classes (444)
College Costs (484)
College Culture (584)
College Goals (386)
College Grants (53)
College In Congress (87)
College Life (550)
College Majors (220)
College News (567)
College Prep (166)
College Savings Accounts (19)
College Scholarships (153)
College Search (115)
College Students (435)
College Tips (112)
Community College (59)
Community Service (40)
Community Service Scholarships (26)
Course Enrollment (19)
Economy (117)
Education (26)
Education Study (29)
Employment (41)
Essay Scholarship (38)
FAFSA (54)
Federal Aid (98)
Finances (70)
Financial Aid (409)
Financial Aid Information (56)
Financial Aid News (54)
Financial Tips (40)
Food (44)
Food/Cooking (27)
GPA (80)
Grades (91)
Graduate School (56)
Graduate Student Scholarships (20)
Graduate Students (65)
Graduation Rates (38)
Grants (62)
Health (38)
High School (129)
High School News (70)
High School Student Scholarships (178)
High School Students (302)
Higher Education (110)
Internships (526)
Job Search (177)
Just For Fun (112)
Loan Repayment (39)
Loans (46)
Military (16)
Money Management (134)
Online College (20)
Pell Grant (27)
President Obama (23)
Private Colleges (34)
Private Loans (19)
Roommates (100)
SAT (22)
Scholarship Applications (162)
Scholarship Information (176)
Scholarship Of The Week (265)
Scholarship Search (213)
Scholarship Tips (86)
Scholarships (398)
Sports (62)
Sports Scholarships (21)
Stafford Loans (24)
Standardized Testing (45)
State Colleges (42)
State News (33)
Student Debt (82)
Student Life (510)
Student Loans (137)
Study Abroad (67)
Study Skills (215)
Teachers (94)
Technology (111)
Tips (503)
Transfer Scholarship (16)
Tuition (93)
Undergraduate Scholarships (35)
Undergraduate Students (154)
Volunteer (45)
Work And College (83)
Work Study (20)
Writing Scholarship (18)

Categories

529 Plan (2)
Back To School (357)
College And The Economy (507)
College Applications (248)
College Budgets (341)
College Classes (564)
College Costs (743)
College Culture (922)
College Grants (133)
College In Congress (131)
College Life (938)
College Majors (330)
College News (896)
College Savings Accounts (57)
College Search (389)
Coverdell (1)
FAFSA (115)
Federal Aid (131)
Fellowships (23)
Financial Aid (698)
Food/Cooking (76)
GPA (277)
Graduate School (107)
Grants (72)
High School (531)
High School News (250)
Housing (172)
Internships (565)
Just For Fun (220)
Press Releases (1)
Roommates (138)
Scholarship Applications (218)
Scholarship Of The Week (341)
Scholarships (590)
Sports (74)
Standardized Testing (58)
Student Loans (224)
Study Abroad (61)
Tips (820)
Uncategorized (7)
Virtual Intern (532)

Archives

< Jan February 2015 Mar >
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
25262728293031
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
1234567

<< < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>
Page 4 of 41