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12 Year-Old Genius To Be A Doctor By Age 18?

May 24, 2016

by Susan Dutca

12-year-old Tanishq Abraham has already earned three associate's degrees and has been accepted to two University of California system four-year colleges. 60 percent of college students today are twice that age before they earn a single bachelor's degree.

Tanishq Abraham started taking college courses at age 7 and has been accepted to UC Davis and received the highest honor - a Regents Scholarship - to UC Santa Cruz. He plans to become a doctor and medical researcher before he turns 18. Although professors were reluctant to let him have such a large head start, he began community college when his peers were still in second grade and received three associate's degrees from American River College in general science; math and physical science; and foreign language students. He was allowed to attend under one condition: his mother, a veterinary doctor, had to be present during class. When he wasn't asking questions, he was busy explaining general relativity and special relativity to her.

Abraham joined the IQ society Mensa at the age of 4 and was known for picking up knowledge quickly. His accomplishments have earned him a letter of recognition from President Barak Obama. His younger sister Tiara is an award-winning singer and child genius, scoring a 99 percent on the Mensa IQ test.

Being a child prodigy isn't what many people think it is, Abraham claims. "When you think of a genius, you think of a mad scientist kind of thing." When he's not studying, Abraham is the typical, video-gaming, piano playing, and choir singing kid.

Starting and even graduating college early is a possibility, especially if you have a clear idea what field of study you wish to pursue. If you're still researching different major options, check out our list of major-specific scholarships. And most importantly, apply for and earn scholarships to not only graduate more quickly, but with little to no debt!

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Netflix & Apply for Scholarships

May 19, 2016

by Susan Dutca

Netflix is every college student's delight and distraction. What should've been a two-hour study session ended up being 5 hours of watching Game of Thrones. Apply for one of these Top 10 Scholarships in the time it takes you an episode or two of your favorite TV series.

  1. The Scholarships.com "Tell A Friend" $1,000 Sweepstakes

    Deadline: 6/30/2016
    Maximum Award: $1,000

  2. Register & Win Scholarship

    Deadline: 5/31/2016
    Maximum Award: $500

  3. LGMD Awareness Social Media Scholarship

    Deadline: 5/25/2016
    Maximum Award: Varies

  4. #LiveLikeLyly Memorial Scholarship

    Deadline: 5/31/2016
    Maximum Award: $1,000

  5. Delete Cyberbullying Scholarship

    Deadline: 6/30/2016
    Maximum Award: $1,000

  6. Defensive Driving Scholarship

    Deadline: 5/31/2016
    Maximum Award: $1,000

  7. Patsy Takemoto Mink Foundation Scholarship

    Deadline: 8/1/2016
    Maximum Award: $5,000

  8. The Sara and Max Goldsammler Scholarship Fund

    Deadline: 8/10/2016
    Maximum Award: $1,000

  9. The Annual BankMobile Financial Literacy Scholarship

    Deadline: 7/19/2016
    Maximum Award: $1,500

  10. Nexstar Legacy Foundation Management in Plumbing, HVAC or Electrical Scholarships

    Deadline: 8/15/2016
    Maximum Award:$7,000

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Your Body...Your College's Choice?

May 17, 2016

by Susan Dutca

The Supreme Court recently avoided a major ruling on a case challenging the contraceptive coverage mandate in the Affordable Care Act. The justices decided to let the lower courts battle out the issue of faith-based organizations refusing to offer free contraceptive coverage for women.

This week, all seven cases in the consolidated Zubik v. Buwell, No. 14-1418 were sent back to their appeals courts by the Supreme Court on the issue of contraceptive coverage for women. Finding "no view on the merits of the cases," the opinion states that, "in particular, the Court does not decide whether petitioners' religious exercise has been substantially burdened, whether the Government has a compelling interest, or whether the current regulations are the least restrictive means of serving that interest." This could be viewed as the Supreme Court trying to keep their hands clean or perhaps forcing the government and religious organizations to compromise.

Religious organizations and institutions are not required to provide coverage through their insurance plans but must declare their decision to opt out. The government will then work with the school's insurance provider to continue offering the contraception coverage. However, faith-based schools are calling for a complete opt-out option that has them in no way shape or form “complicit with a practice they do not condone."

The Religious Freedom Act requires colleges to demonstrate that their beliefs are significantly violated and burdened by the contraceptive requirement. So far, 37 religiously-affiliated institutions in higher education have sued the federal government for forcing them to offer free contraception to women. The Obama administration has maintained its position to deny exemptions, stating that the arrangement does not violate the Religious Freedom Act or burden religious organizations.

How do you accommodate the moral objections of religious organizations schools while also offering contraception? Lawyers defending the schools cite that the Religious Freedom Act (1993) keeps the government from burdening their religious freedom. On the other hand, opponents state that federal laws already respect the religious beliefs of faith-based schools, and that a complete exemption isn't ideal since other religious groups - such as the Quakers who oppose financing wars with their tax money - do not get breaks just because they have a certain moral belief.

Do you think religious colleges and universities should be forced to provide contraceptive coverage for women if it contradicts their beliefs? Leave us your thoughtful comments below to start a discussion.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Professor’s Vintage Mustang to Fund Scholarships

May 12, 2016

by Susan Dutca

A deceased college professor's 1985 Ford Mustang GT is on the market...to raise money for scholarships and honor the educator who, despite his 35 years of "superb teaching" had no campus memorialization. The vintage muscle car, valued at $15,500, will fund scholarships within three different departments at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse.

Bill Vettes, the Marxist professor at UW-L, is fondly remembered for his humiliation of unprepared students, his "brutal intimidation," and his devotion to teaching "uncomfortable truths." While other classes such as Rec 100 were making snow angels outside his classroom, he demanded attention to "French philosophy with real-world insight." The annual Teacher of the Year Award was suspended after Vettes won it twice in four years.

Vettes' love for his sports cars was evidenced by his ownership of 15 of them - including a 1963 Corvette Stingray, a 1966 Jaguar XKE, a 1987 Mazda RX-7, a 1989 Camaro IROC, and a turbocharged 1991 Dodge Stealth RTU. The man who refused to drive a sports car for less than an hour had even given a former UW-L President's daughter a quick 110 mph ride to school.

Vettes' colleague Jim Parker will be selling the Mustang GT in honor of the Marxist sports car enthusiast. One-third of the proceeds will go to scholarships - one for students studying multicultural understanding, one for elementary education (with a focus on social justice issues), and the last for those majoring or minoring in women's studies or German studies. According to the La Crosse Tribune, the first two scholarships are self-sustaining and when “all three reach that point, Parker will start the William Vettes Scholarship."

If you're passionate about the automotive industry, education, social justice, women's studies, or foreign languages/cultures, check out some of our scholarships by types to begin funding your college education.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Rihanna to Pay Foreign Students’ College Tuition

May 10, 2016

by Susan Dutca

Work, work, work, work hard in school and you may just have your college tuition paid for by Rihanna. The Grammy-winning Barbadian singer and songwriter announced her initiative to help citizens or natives of Brazil, Barbados, Cuba, Haiti, Grenada, and Jamaica through scholarships of up to $50,000 per year. She stated that, "to be able to give the gift of an education is actually an honor...Higher education will provide perspective, opportunities and learning to a group of kids who really deserve this. I am thrilled to be able to do this."

Scholarship renewal is contingent upon maintaining a cumulative GPA of 2.5 and can be renewed every three years or until the international student earns their bachelor's degree, whichever comes first. Students must have been accepted into an accredited four-year college or university in the United States and demonstrate academic performance, leadership and participation in school and community activities, work experience and write a personal essay. It is unknown how much money will be disbursed annually.

Founded in 2012, Rihanna's well-known nonprofit Clara Lionel Foundation strives to improve the "quality of life for communities globally in the areas of health, education, arts and culture." The foundation has already donated $1.75 million to the oncology department at a Barbadian hospital. Additionally, her partnership with the makeup company MAC and the Viva Glam campaign raises money for those with AIDS and HIV. The sales from her first lipstick alone raised $60 million in 2013.

According to NPR, "students from these countries are generally not well-represented among the ranks of foreign students in the U.S." Despite the small percentage of these foreign students studying in the United States, there are plentiful scholarships and organizations dedicated to funding international students' college education. To get a glimpse, check out our scholarships for international students/study abroad.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Gay Student Banned from Publicly Receiving Scholarship

May 5, 2016

by Susan Dutca

An openly gay student at Dowling Catholic High School decided to transform stigma into success by serving as a leader and advocate for LGBT rights at his school. Even after creating a gay-straight alliance and being awarded the Gold Matthew Shepard Scholarship, he was told that he could not receive the scholarship at the annual senior awards ceremony.

Last April, Tyler McCubbin, a respectable substitute teacher and volunteer track coach had his full time teaching position offer rescinded after a background check revealed he was openly gay. Dowling High school student Liam Jameson was one of the hundreds of students who protested the perceived injustice through a walkout. In an open letter, Jameson detailed his numerous attempted suicides because he felt alone, afraid, and "dreaded having to go to school the next day." He took the decision to help struggling peers and created a "safe environment for LGBT students where they don't feel the need to self-harm or commit suicide." His petition to create a LGBT club/safe space earned 2,000 signatures and is now known as One Dowling Family.

Through his efforts, Jameson earned the Gold Matthew Shepard Scholarship sponsored by the Eychaner Foundation in Des Moines. However, Dowling administration refuses to present the scholarship at the annual senior awards dinner on May 5th. Jameson claims that they manipulated the rules multiple times and took to a Change.org petition, requesting that the school presents him the award this week. Even McCubbin took to social media and urged people to sign his petition.

The school sent a message to its faculty and media stating that they are "proud of all [our] senior students how have received awards and scholarships to further their education," and that they "do not allow organizations who are awarding the scholarship to attend and individually present the scholarship to the student." Furthermore, they are "pleased one of [our] students received the Matthew Shepard Award and he will be honored in the same manner as his classmates." The Eychaner Foundation claims that Dowling changed its policy in recent months to specifically "target" LGBT-associated scholarships.

Do you think Jameson should have his award presented at the awards ceremony? If you are a student like Jameson who has a passion for social action, community service, and helping others - or if you yourself identify with or support the LGBT community - check out our many scholarships to help fund your college dreams.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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POTUS' Daughter to Attend Harvard University after Gap Year

May 3, 2016

by Susan Dutca

Malia Obama won't be the first child of a president to be accepted into Harvard University, but her decision to take a gap year sets her apart from the traditional college-bound student. As the gap year trend gains popularity in the US, there is still some reluctance in putting pause on a college education. Could it pose some trouble for those who aren’t socialites?

Despite her father's advice to "not stress too much about one particular college," or focus on name-brand, Malia chose to attend one of the nation's most prestigious and expensive universities. Come fall of 2017, she’s expected to add her name to the long line of ultra-wealthy celebrities and American figures who attended Harvard, including John Adams II, Abraham Lincoln’s son, and John F. Kennedy's daughter.

What exactly is a gap year? It is the time students defer from attending college, right out of high school, in order to pursue other avenues such as traveling, gaining work experience, and getting in touch with their inner soul and desires prior to settling into what could be considered a form of adulthood. One person's productive gap year could easily be another's 12-month vacation. There's been no word as to what Malia will do during this gap year, but a survey indicated that many students focus on personal growth, traveling and experiencing cultures, while taking a break from academics. This gap could serve as a good time to increase community service and learn skills you may not otherwise learn during college. Essentially, a way to avoid the "growing rate of student burn-outs."

Taking a year off could be pricey and not ideal for low-income students. According to one study, the "majority of people who do not go straight to college after high school end up having a much harder time completing their degrees...getting married, having a baby, becoming financially responsible for siblings, or losing academic motivation "may truncate one's higher education pursuits. While the American Gap Association boasts success with students who took a gap year, the majority of the students had college-educated parents and came from household incomes of more than $100,000 a year. These students already have a greater likelihood for success; many of them having parents who could pay their college tuition. Furthermore, federal financial aid waits for no one. Students would have to apply for the year in which they would enroll which could consequentially "make it harder for students on aid to plan a gap year." And while Harvard condones a gap year, the trend is not widely-accepted at other colleges and universities.

Do you think a gap year is a good option for students? Trying to find yourself by putting college off may come with a price. While some students take a gap year to work minimum wage and help fund their college education, we believe that you should be rewarded for your academic, athletic, and extracurricular achievements without having to take time off school. Tuition prices are only increasing, and won't remain stagnant even as you take a gap year. The best way to make college affordable is through free money: scholarships.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Balling on a Tight Budget with Limited DI Basketball Scholarships

Apr 29, 2016

by Susan Dutca

117 underclassmen recently took advantage of the new NCAA rule which allows them to test the NBA waters without losing NCAA eligibility as long as they don't hire an agent. However, talented athletes are stuck between choosing to play on scholarships or play professionally. Division I schools are balling on a tight budget, with only 13 scholarships available per team. With the constant transferring and drafts, there's no telling what will happen to vacant spots for scholarships or if they will deplete far too quickly, leaving some highly-talented players uncompensated.

In Division I basketball, scholarships are based on head count, which means they cannot be dispersed among student-athletes (unlike equivalency sports such as baseball or water polo). In total, there are 15 scholarships for women and 13 for men on a team. If collegiate players join the NBA, the NBA's D-League, or a foreign pro team, "there's a summer-long scramble to replace them," according to Randy Peterson. Last season, a reported 700 college basketball players were lost to various professional leagues. With the new early NBA entry rule, players have a chance to see if they are suitable for the NBA climate but risk losing their scholarship at their college, especially when the scholarship limit is so small.

The NCAA reports that on average, women playing at the Division I level receive more than male athletes – in 2014, women athletes received $15,162 on average in comparison to their male counterparts, who received an average of $14,270. But only 2 percent of high school student-athletes receive athletic scholarship when playing at the Division I and II level, according to the NCAA. Sure, many athletes want to play at the highest division level but recruiting experts urge athletes to consider playing in Division II, III, or at the FCS level. "Even if you're not a full-ride-caliber athlete," states CEO of Go Big Recruiting, "there's a lot of potential to get money."

We offer a wide variety of athletic scholarships - ones for highly-talented athletes looking to compete at a high level and others for students who simply participated in a sport. Regardless of your athletic ability, there are scholarships in place to help fund your higher education goals and athletic dreams.

In your opinion, should the NCAA start offering more basketball, and athletic scholarships in general?

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Street Corner Scholarships? Student Panhandles in Attempt to Pay for College

Apr 26, 2016

by Susan Dutca

The class of 2015 had the largest student loan debt in history and while some students may side hustle to cover their tuition bill, one student has opted to skip the grind and instead, hustle the streets to help pay for her college education.

Star student Emily Stutz wasn't offered the necessary financial aid to attend college, even after she appealed to all of the eight schools to which she was accepted. Her parents, who earn a combined $155,000 as special education teachers, aren't able to "come up with $20,000-$30,000 a year," according to Stutz. So she created a GoFundMe account and panhandled outside a local Target over the weekend, holding a sign that read "H.S. Senior. No $ for College. Anything helps." So far, Stutz has raised over $24,000 via her GoFundMe page, which would cover one year's tuition at a private college - so she considered staying home and going to the University of Massachusetts which costs only $13,500 a year.

While she had many sympathizers, some drivers told her to get a job. Though she has a 4.0 GPA, works two jobs, has been accepted to all eight to which she applied, she claims, "even the smaller cost [of attending college] was unattainable." Most importantly, Stutz wanted to relay her message on the issue of student loan debt and college unaffordability, stating "It's such a big issue with the presidential election...people take out these huge loans and have to pay back like a mortgage on their education."

Merit scholarships at private institutions aren't enough to lessen the burden of the tuition price tag, according to Stutz. While we were unable to discover to which schools Miss Lutz applied, perhaps a community college would be an affordable option. The money she has raised via GoFundMe so far would likely pay for all or most of her undergraduate studies if she spent the first two years at one of the dozens of community colleges in Massachusetts, most of which are around $4,000 per year. There are also ample opportunities out there for students who take the time to search and apply for scholarships. Many high school students start searching for scholarships when they are a sophomore or junior in high school, which is a great idea as well, rather than relying on the colleges to which you apply for all of your financial aid. Applying for more than one scholarship also increases your chances of earning more money towards your college education. Just read the Success Stories of some of our users and see how they made their post-secondary education affordable and occasionally even free.

In your opinion, do you think panhandling for college funds is the best option? Would you do it? What other options would you consider pursuing? Leave us your thoughtful comments below.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Tinder Swipes Right, Pays for Frat Girl's College

Apr 21, 2016

by Susan Dutca

With Tinder, you can find your future partner, land a hookup, or...earn a scholarship? A female junior at the University of Nebraska Oklahoma was awarded a scholarship and paid internship for defending her use of the mobile dating app.

After Shannon Workman's sorority, Chi Omega, found that she had a Tinder profile picture while rocking a T-shirt with their letters, she was called to a disciplinary meeting. They found the picture to be "disrespectful" and pushed for a "membership revocation," which Workman secretly recorded. Rather than go through an appeals process, Workman opted to left-swipe and bounce. After choosing to exercise her right to use the Tinder app and defy Chi Omega, Tinder CEO and Co-founder Sean Rad reached out to offer Workman a full tuition scholarship to finish her undergrad education. Additionally, she was offered a paid internship at the company because what she did "sends a very empowering message to young women and college students."

Though Tinder has been blamed for creating a modern hookup culture and creating a "dating apocalypse", Workman stated that she defends Tinder because "I don't think there's anything wrong with it. Some people use it for hookups but I don't, and a lot of great things happen through Tinder.” Tinder was started at USC, primarily through the sorority and fraternity realm - which is still the most active group on Tinder. Over 50 percent of users are ages 18 to 24, many of whom are women.

What're your thoughts on Tinder offering a scholarship to the student? You may have your own causes that you believe in - from social action and environmental activism, to simple community service, there are scholarships that award student’s leadership and passion for causes larger than themselves.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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