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Taming Noisy Summer Neighbors

July 10, 2012

Taming Noisy Summer Neighbors

by Kayla Herrera

If you’re a college student, the following scenario is bound to present itself: You have to work or have a test early in the morning but your neighbors have decided to party until 3 or 4 a.m. You’re not a party pooper (you just don’t want to be a zombie the next day!) so you should know there is absolutely nothing wrong with standing up for yourself – and your health – to better perform at work or summer academics.

Don’t jump out of bed and bang on your neighbor’s door at the first sound of noise. Wait and see if the activity continues either the next night or next week. If it does, say something to your neighbor to let them know you’re below/above/next door to them. They might not realize how loud they are and how thin the walls are.

If the party noise continues for multiple nights, try to gauge why before confronting your neighbors. If they’re clearly intoxicated, just tell them to keep it down because you’re trying to sleep. (It’s no use having a serious conversation with anyone in their condition; sometimes, they realize it’s late anyway and just needed a reminder.) If you happen to talk to someone sober, explain to them that the noise has gone on for a few nights now and it is interfering with your work or school schedule. Suggest a compromise like quieting down after midnight.

If your neighbors ignore you and you still can’t sleep, bang on the ceiling, floor or wall with a broomstick or threaten to call the cops. I’ve done this twice and both times, my neighbors have quieted down...fast. Unless the party is WAY out of control, someone sounds hurt or something illegal is going on, don’t actually get the police involved – saying you will gets the message across that you’re serious about taking action. Sometimes drastic measures have to be taken but they’re effective: I haven’t had problems since and neither will you.

In addition to being a Scholarships.com virtual intern, Michigan Tech student Kayla Herrera is a media coordinator for the Michigan Tech Youth Programs and is a writer for The Daily News in Iron Mountain, Mich., Examiner.com and WHOA Magazine. She love a tantalizing, action-packed video game and can't get enough of horror movies (Stephen King's books always have her in their grip, though she prefers the old over the new). Writing is what she has always done and that is what she is here to do.

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Have Some Fun This Summer...for Free!

July 11, 2012

Have Some Fun This Summer...for Free!

by Radha Jhatakia

It’s finally summertime and most college students are taking a break from school with the exception of those of you who are taking summer courses. But even with work and school, all college students can find some time to enjoy the summer! Fun activities can often cost money but there are plenty of enjoyable things you can do over the summer that a student-friendly budget can accommodate.

For those of you who enjoy outdoor activities, there are plenty of options available. You can plan picnics in a park close to you or have barbecues in someone’s backyard – you can have everyone pitch in a certain amount for food and supplies or turn it into a potluck where every guest brings one prepared dish. Hiking and camping are also excellent (and generally free) activities; recreational parks have hiking trails and campgrounds open for all to use so take advantage of them this summer.

If the outdoorsy scene isn’t your preference but the beach is, there are plenty more activities you can do there. Swimming, surfing and paddleboarding are all options but remember to be safe in the water! If the water isn’t your forte, you can always play beach volleyball, have a bonfire with some s’mores or soak up the sun and tan.

Prefer to stay indoors over the summer? There are plenty of arts and crafts projects you can do around the house such as making decorative items. You can also take the time to catch up on things you couldn't do during the academic year, like take a class at the YMCA, go to the gym, read some books, catch up on movies and TV shows, and spend time with family and friends.

Once you graduate from college, you won’t have three months of vacation (unless you become a teacher) – right now, summer is yours so take advantage of it!

Radha Jhatakia is a communications major at San Jose State University. She's a transfer student who had some ups and downs in school and many obstacles to face; these challenges – plus support from family, friends and cat – have only made Radha stronger and have given her the experience to help others with the same issues. In her spare time, she enjoys writing, reading, cooking, sewing and designing. A social butterfly, Radha hopes to work in public relations and marketing upon graduation.

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Is Not Struggling a Struggle?

July 25, 2012

Is Not Struggling a Struggle?

by Kara Coleman

Recently, 22-year-old Taylor Cotter published an article on The Huffington Post about her success since she graduated from college in May. The odd thing about Cotter’s piece is that she doesn’t take the angle of a success story in a struggling economy – she feels that she should be struggling more!

Cotter talks about how many of her friends are working part-time jobs, living at home with their parents and/or having diets consisting mostly of Ramen; she feels that she is missing out on the post-college twentysomething life by having a ‘real job’ and a 401(k). Some readers – including myself – are appalled by Cotter’s tone. It seems to me that it would be the dream of every college student to find a full-time job directly after graduation but Cotter almost seems remorseful that she made herself marketable to companies who would hire her.

I have been living at home with my parents and working part-time jobs ranging from lifeguarding to tutoring to retail over the past few years to supplement educational costs. Now that I am preparing to move into an apartment with my friends next month, I know full well that I’ll be eating my fair share of peanut butter sandwiches and cereal; while I’m excited to begin this next phase of my life, I’m more so look forward to the day when I have a full-time job – the same situation Cotter is essentially complaining about.

Isn’t that what college is for? Teaching us how to go from being dependent children to self-supporting adults? Or I could be wrong: Maybe it’s a time to either live with your parents or eat Ramen noodles. What do YOU think?

Kara Coleman graduated from Gadsden State Community College with an Associate of Arts degree and she is currently studying communications with concentration in print journalism at Jacksonville State University. Kara's writing has been featured in Teen Ink magazine and she is a children's author through Big Dif Books; she is also the editor-in-chief of JSU's student newspaper, The Chanticleer.

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Taking Advantage of New Opportunities After a Semester Abroad

July 26, 2012

Taking Advantage of New Opportunities After a Semester Abroad

by Darci Miller

So you’re back from your semester abroad and you’re pumped to jump right back into your American life. Of course, you’d rather be gallivanting across Europe like you’ve been doing for the past few months but thinking about returning to your old activities makes you inexplicably happy...until you find that school is as different a place as you are a person.

Unfortunately, time didn’t stop and wait for you to return stateside. Your five months away changed you as much as it changed the place you’re returning to. Suddenly, your previous leadership positions are no longer available and you’re facing a bit of a crisis.

First of all, don’t panic! If you’re worried about what this gap in your resume will look like to an employer, don’t. The fact that you studied abroad has the potential to look just as valuable as any job experience. If marketed correctly, it can display your growth as a person, exposure to new cultures and whatever new skills you may have picked up.

While falling right back into your old routine might’ve been nice, life is always changing and this situation is no different. Now’s the time to reprioritize...and take advantage! I myself lost my editorial position on the school newspaper – kind of unfortunate, yes, but this gives me the chance to go back to being a writer and take on more responsibilities elsewhere. New internships, anyone?

This is, I think, the key: Don’t look at it as a loss but rather as the universe giving you a reminder that a trip abroad isn’t the only way to explore new things. It’s okay to miss your old job just like it’s okay to miss your old haunts and routines from your semester abroad. But if you look at this as an opportunity, it could bring tons of good things your way.

Darci Miller is a New Yorker studying journalism and sport administration at the University of Miami. When she’s not writing for the school newspaper, you can find her at the gym, either working or working out. She loves all ‘80s pop culture (the cheesier, the better!) and glues herself to her TV when the Olympics are on. She dreams big and believes the sky’s the limit.

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How to Maximize Your Experience When You Have Minimal Time

August 21, 2012

How to Maximize Your Experience When You Have Minimal Time

by Darci Miller

It’s that time again, folks: Summer is ending and we’re all lugging all our stuff back to our dorm rooms for another year of school. After reuniting with your friends, everyone asks how your summer was and how that internship went. Wait...what internship? While others swap stories about impossible assignments, "constructive criticism" and weird bosses, you sit there awkwardly and silently swear to yourself that you’re going to put your nose to the grindstone this semester. No opportunity will be passed up and your resume will look absolutely glorious.

Hang on. Between classes, clubs, a job, potential internships and – oh yeah! – a social life and maybe some sleep, you’re left with less than five hours in the day. Oops...but don’t fret: It's possible if you know how to work the system. And, luckily for you, some of us already do.

Internships are a must to add to your resume before you leave college but if you’re attending school/living in a small city with few opportunities, don’t have a car and have to rely on unreliable public transit, etc., this can be a super difficult task. Solution? Go virtual! Virtual (or remote) internships are THE best way to get experience in a time-efficient way. You can work from anywhere there’s a computer with Internet access and you often get to make your own schedule. Take it from someone who’s had four remote positions already – you’re going to want to look into virtual internships as an option.

While internships are great, you’re obviously going to want a job to pad your bank account a bit, right? Nothing fancy is necessary so your first stops should absolutely be on campus. Places like the library, gym and all academic departments all need students to work for them and they’re in walking distance from your dorm and/or classes. Less travel time means more time spent doing something productive, so take advantage. Another HUGE plus? On-campus jobs are often really good about letting you do homework while on shift. Multitasking at its finest and yet another way to free up more of your day!

The key here is to be as efficient as possible with your time. Use it as productively as you can, overlap tasks and travel, and you’re good to go. Now stop procrastinating and get to work!

Darci Miller is a New Yorker studying journalism and sport administration at the University of Miami. When she’s not writing for the school newspaper, you can find her at the gym, either working or working out. She loves all ‘80s pop culture (the cheesier, the better!) and glues herself to her TV when the Olympics are on. She dreams big and believes the sky’s the limit.

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Earning Money AND Experience for College!

November 7, 2012

Earning Money AND Experience for College!

by Lisa Lowdermilk

Now that the semester is well underway, now might be a good time to start thinking about next semester, especially if you're worried about paying tuition. It’s not exactly a secret that college costs are continuing to rise so it’s in your best interest to find a job which will a) help you defray these expenses and b) pay a decent hourly wage. Admittedly, I thought a job which fulfills both those requirements was too much to ask for in this economy, and so I was pleasantly surprised when I found out about Education at Work.

Education at Work is an organization which requires you to be a college student and rewards your academic endeavors with tuition assistance and a competitive salary. Sure, you won’t make a ton more money than you would at a more traditional customer service job but you wouldn’t be going to college in the first place if you did, right? Plus, Education at Work supports a wide variety of industries, including healthcare, cable TV, utilities and more, giving even the pickiest of college students a chance to find a career which suits their interests. And of course, maintaining a job through Education at Work looks great on a résumé, as it shows future employers that you were committed to finishing your education from the start.

To apply for a position through Education at Work, click here to tell the organization more about your skills and complete a phone audition and typing test to ensure your customer skills are up to snuff. Make sure to block out about 45 minutes to complete the assessment in a private setting – after all, you don’t want to do a voice audition at a library! Education at Work positions are highly sought after so if you’re interested, apply today!

Lisa Lowdermilk is a published poet, avid video gamer and artist. Her poems have appeared in Celebrate Young Poets: West (Fall 2006) edition and Widener University's The Blue Route. She enjoys watching thrillers, trying different restaurants and attempting to breakdance. Lisa is now majoring in professional writing at the University of Colorado Denver.

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Affording College While Avoiding Debt

Schools Eliminate Loans, Educate Students To Be Fiscally Responsible

November 14, 2012

Affording College While Avoiding Debt

by Alexis Mattera

A college education is far from cheap but some students are able to graduate with far less debt than others. How? Scholarships and grants play a huge role in keeping expenses low but some institutions are lending a helping hand by revising their financial aid packages and educating their students on the importance of fiscal responsibility.

Davidson College, for example, instituted a “no loans” financial aid policy in 2007 and now addresses need through grants and student employment. Others, like St. John's College, Elizabeth City State University and the SUNY schools, are doing their part by providing tailored support services to students through graduation - the latter, in fact, have launched a system-wide effort to prevent student borrowers from defaulting on their loans by offering net price calculators and communicating early and often with borrowers.

You can read more about what’s being done to combat student debt here but we want to know if your college (or intended school) has similar initiatives in place. If not, what kind of services and information should they be providing regarding student debt?

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Spring Break Planning Tips & Advisement

February 13, 2013

Spring Break Planning Tips & Advisement

by Chelsea Slaughter

We’re midway through February, which means it’s the perfect time to get your spring break plans in order! How will you spend your time off? Here are a few suggestions:

If you plan to travel, check out sites like StudentCity.com for information on Panama City, South Padre Island and other popular destinations. Take time to research different cities and their respective attractions but keep in mind that the sooner you finalize your plans, the cheaper your trip will be. You should also decide who you travel with (a responsible group of friends you can trust is key) and how you will get around (if you are not driving to your destination, realize you’ll have to walk, cab or take public transit once you’re there).

A vacation is not the only way to spend your spring break, as many universities have alternate spring programs that include volunteering with Habitat for Humanity and other organizations. If your school does not offer a program like this, check out UnitedWay.org to find an alternate spring break trip that suits you. You’ll be able to experience a new place while volunteering and helping the community: This year, they have one in Newark, NJ to help families rebuild after Hurricane Sandy.

Another idea could be a short-term internship. I spent my first spring break job shadowing a digital marketer in the entertainment industry and it was a great way to build my resume and get hands-on experience for a future career. Work hard and you could score an internship or job for the summer!

Spring break can be whatever you want it to be but the key element is planning. Don’t wait until the last moment; if you have nothing planned yet, then it’s time to get started!

Chelsea Slaughter is currently a junior at Jacksonville State University majoring in communications (public relations concentration) and minoring in art. She serves as a resident assistant on campus, is the treasurer in the Public Relations Organization and is an active member in W.I.S.E., NAACP and Omicron Delta Kappa Honors Leadership Society. She aims to work in the entertainment industry post-graduation and is well on her way thanks to an internship with a digital marketer to several music artists. Chelsea strives to achieve all of her goals and motivate others along the way.

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Understanding Your Housing Options

February 22, 2013

Understanding Your Housing Options

by Mike Sheffey

The college experience is a great one but can be a little challenging with respect to housing and its wide range of options. For example, many students choose to live off campus at big universities following their freshman year, while others who attend smaller schools might be in student housing or dorms all four years. I know that at Wofford, we have it pretty good but there are some general things that all colleges seem to do the same.

The housing at your prospective college will get better each year. The dorms will get bigger, nicer and easier to live in. The difference between first-year student housing and senior housing, regardless of institution, is huge. At my small college, our senior housing is essentially apartments (though our laundry is in a separate building) and our junior housing is huge dorms. If you go back to my first year, the housing was livable but far from spacious. That’s par for the course for anywhere you look (generally, though, there are smaller rooms at big universities).

There is always the option (sometimes the preferred/recommended option) of living off campus after your first year. Many of my friends have taken this option to get better rooms, more independence and, in some cases, cheaper housing. Lots of apartment complexes are still qualified as “student” housing and have primarily students that live there. And it seems that they are constantly being built as enrollment grows each year.

So whether it’s on campus or off, student housing or apartments or simple dorms, the best way to determine what works for you is to visit, tour or maybe stay at a friend’s dorm or apartment to see how it is. Small spaces were never an issue for me in freshman and sophomore dorms because I did all my work in the study building but if you’re someone that might need space to work and can focus in a dorm, you might want to look for the option with more room space. Research before you move in. Just remember that living conditions improve in college over time, though small rooms and hall settings can make for great memories!

Mike Sheffey is a junior at Wofford College double majoring in computer science and Spanish. He loves all things music and has recently taken up photography. Mike works for an on-campus sports broadcasting company as well as the music news blog PropertyOfZack.com. He hopes to use this blogging position to inform and assist others who are seeking the right college or those currently enrolled in college by providing advice on college life, both in general and specific to Wofford.

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Student Social Media Etiquette

February 27, 2013

Student Social Media Etiquette

by Chelsea Slaughter

Social media gives us what we feel like is a platform to express our thoughts and feelings on any issue around us. We can connect to people we know (or may not know) globally with ease but we must be cautious about what we say and what we post on these open sites. Your platform for free speech can either help or harm you.

If you check Scholarships.com’s blog regularly, you read a post about a college student who was expelled because of what he posted on Facebook. A lot of students may think “Wow, that’s crazy. That could never happen to me.” But in fact, it can! When posting on your favorite sites, keep these dos and don’ts in mind:

  • DO try and connect to people you may not have a chance to meet sans social media. (i.e., people you look up to, international students, etc.)
  • DON’T post anything you would not want your parents, professors or employers to see. These days, employers and college officials will often use social media as an extension of your resume to give them a better idea of who you are as a person.
  • DO keep a clean, PG profile. Untag yourself in any compromising posts or photos.
  • DON’T assume that since your page is private, it cannot be seen. There are plenty of ways to bypass such “protection” that you may not be aware of.
  • DO separate yourself from situations that could involve drama or negativity.
  • DON’T say anything about someone or something that you would not say in front of them. One of the main causes of lost friendships and peer conflicts is based off of social media.

Your social media accounts are a direct representation of you. Make sure the image presented is one you can be proud to call yours!

Chelsea Slaughter is currently a junior at Jacksonville State University majoring in communications (public relations concentration) and minoring in art. She serves as a resident assistant on campus, is the treasurer in the Public Relations Organization and is an active member in W.I.S.E., NAACP and Omicron Delta Kappa Honors Leadership Society. She aims to work in the entertainment industry post-graduation and is well on her way thanks to an internship with a digital marketer to several music artists. Chelsea strives to achieve all of her goals and motivate others along the way.

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