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by Administrator

Summer and school didn’t couple well in middle school, but now, well, they may not be the worst choice. With the exception of some lucky individuals, most college students spend at least a part of their summer working. Adding a class or two to one’s schedule won’t ruin what wasn’t paradise in the first place. While summer classes do require additional work, they are a sensible option for many. Here are some reasons why off-season classes may be worth the effort:

  • Burnout among college students is an overly familiar complaint during the school year. Students who lessen their yearly grind by taking just one or two classes in the summer may find their nerves less worn, their social life more vibrant and their remaining classes more enjoyable when the fall semester rolls around.
  • Grades are much more difficult to maintain when students are overwhelmed by a large number of classes. With fewer assignments to take care of, those who pick up a new class will have more time throughout the year to concentrate on all subjects.
  • Learning is an important component of college. Classes are certainly stepping stones to a future career, but they should also be, to some extent, enjoyable. Many students select their majors based on interests, but too much work can take the enjoyment out of learning new things. A more relaxed approach to classes during the year will allow students to retain their knowledge and enjoy the process of acquiring it.
  • Tuition is becoming an increasingly heavy burden on college students and their families. By taking a few summer classes, students may be eligible to graduate earlier than expected. Yes, summer school is not free, but staying in college for an additional semester because you are one class short of graduation can be frustrating. More importantly, completing school more quickly will allow students who struggle financially to enter the job force earlier. While this may not be the optimum option for many, students who deal with heavy debt can benefit from a full-time income.

Posted Under:

College Costs , College Culture


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by Administrator

The Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) is a form of federal student aid that does not need to be repaid. It is awarded to students by colleges and universities, and a mixture of federal and school funds is used to pay for the program. As FSEOG awards are based on financial need, students interested in obtaining this form of financial aid will have to complete a FAFSA and have their Expected Family Contribution (EFC) calculated. A standard federal formula will be used to determine a student’s financial need, but schools will have a large degree of leverage over how much each student will receive.

To obtain the FSEOG, a student must attend one of the approximately 4,000 colleges and universities that participate in the federal program.  Schools that take part in the FSEOG program receive grant money from the government but must still contribute 25 percent of the funds.

Individual colleges and universities determine how much grant money each student will receives based on fund availability, the time a student submits their FAFSA (earlier is better) and the student’s level of need. The yearly awards may vary from $100 to $4,000 per year, and those who were eligible for Pell Grants will be considered first.

If a student is awarded an FSEOG, the school may pay them directly, credit their school account or both. Depending on the school’s term system, students may be paid each semester, trimester or quarter. Regardless of the institutions set course timeline, the money must be paid in at least two installments.

Posted Under:

College Grants , FAFSA , Financial Aid


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by Administrator

Weighed down by an economic downturn and a cut in federal subsidies, student lenders have been lining up at the FFEL exit sign for months. But if the past two days are a sign of what’s to come, many are reconsidering their departure. On Wednesday, Margaret Spellings sent a letter to numerous student lenders pledging the Department of the Treasury’s support in helping them get back on their feet.

According to The Chronicle of Higher Education, the Department of Education’s plan to purchase loans student lenders have trouble selling had three student lenders declaring their plans to return within two days. Though the funds are meant to be a temporary, one-year solution to the student loan crunch, the decision was enough to convince NorthStar, the Brazos Group and Graduate Leverage to return to the FFEL program.

"Many details still need to be worked out, and we will share those as they become available. But the good news is we’re back in the federal student loan business, and students and families will have more loan options for the upcoming year,” stated NorthStar’s Chief Executive Taige Thornton on the company website.

The security now provided by the federal government may be enough to lure more FFEL student lenders back into the business. It may also prove incentive enough for student lenders to relax the increasingly tight criteria used to judge potential borrowers. While the credit crunch is certainly not over, the current federal aid contributions may prove sufficient in convincing some, if not most, lenders to return to the workforce.


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by Administrator

As a means of promoting diversity and developing talent, Scholarships.com has created a new set of scholarships for high school students and undergraduate students. The Scholarships.com “Fund Your Future” Area of Study Scholarships consist of the Scholarships.com Resolve to Evolve Scholarship and thirteen $1,000 awards to be granted to students who pursue a postsecondary education in one of thirteen designated fields and 185 related majors.

Included is the Scholarships.com College Education Scholarship, an award for students who plan to or are already majoring in the Education and related majors. Finding money for college is not easy. By providing financial aid to education majors, we hope to produce another class of individuals who can use their knowledge to help future scholars.

If you’re interested in applying for this essay scholarship, respond to the following question in 250 to 350 words (entries that fall outside of this word range will be disqualified): “What has influenced your decision to pursue a career in education?”

Prize:

  1. Applicant must be a registered Scholarships.com user. Creating an account is simple and free of charge
  2. Applicant must be a U.S. citizen
  3. Applicant must be undergraduate student or a high school senior who plans to enroll in a college or university in the coming fall
  4. Applicant must have indicated an interest in one of the following majors: Child Care/Education, Education, Health Education, Music Education, Special Education

Deadline: August 30, 2008

Further details about the application process can be found by conducting a free college scholarship search. Once the search is completed, students eligible for the award will find it in their scholarship list.


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by Administrator

More than a year after their controversial ad suggested that financial aid officials were profiting at the expense of student borrowers, MyRichUncle’s in-your-face marketing tactics have again caused an uproar among college officials. The ads in question, ones recently found in The New York Times and USA Today, portray a split head—no brains—with the slogan, “I didn’t use my brain, I went straight to the financial aid office,” reported The Chronicle of Higher Education.

After MyRichUncle's initial ad ran, an investigation into college financial aid offices led to revelations that numerous colleges were receiving money to advertise select student lenders on their official preferred-lender lists. Since then administrators at a number of colleges and universities were forced to resign. Frustrated at the prospect of more accusations and worried that the self-serving actions of a few would come to represent the general view of college representatives, financial aid officials are fuming about the new ads.

To find what MyRichUncle could tell me that financial aid officials couldn’t, I visited the student lender's site. Expecting to see federal student aid definitions or information about college scholarships and grants under their “Financial Aid 101” heading, I instead found that I needed to download the latest flash player to see further results. Information about company loans was, of course, much easier to navigate.


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TEACH Grants

March 21, 2008

by Administrator

The Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) Grant is one of the most anticipated federal student aid programs for current and future teachers. Passed as a part of the College Cost Reduction and Access Act of 2007, the TEACH Grant will provide financial assistance to students who agree to spend time teaching in low-income areas.

The new program will go into affect during the 2008-2009 school year, and, as with other federal aid programs, the exact details and award sums may change in the future. For now, students who are eligible for the program may receive a grant of up to $4,000 per year. Like other teaching scholarships and grants, the TEACH Grant will encourage qualified students to spend time teaching in areas that are frequently underfunded and understaffed. The eligibility criteria and additional details are as follows:

Eligibility: 1. Students who receive a TEACH Grant must agree to work full-time at low-income elementary or secondary schools for at least four years. 2. TEACH Grant recipients must agree to teach a high-need subject. 3. Recipients must be US citizens or eligible non-citizens. 4. Although the TEACH Grant is not a need-based award, applicants must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). 5. The TEACH Grant recipient must be enrolled as an undergraduate, post-baccalaureate or graduate student in a college or university participating in the TEACH program. 6. To continue receiving the award, a student must remain in good academic standing. This will usually mean either scoring in the 75th percentile on a college admissions test or maintaining a minimum GPA of 3.25. 7. The recipient must sign a TEACH Grant service agreement.

Before applying for this grant, students should be aware that the TEACH Grant is only awarded to students who complete the service requirement. If the student does not comply with the teaching agreement, the TEACH Grant will be turned into a Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan. The loan charge will include both the grant sum and the interest the student would have accumulated had they been charged from the date of each TEACH Grant disbursement.

Posted Under:

College Grants , Financial Aid


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by Administrator

The Social Equity Venture Fund (SEVEN), a nonprofit organization providing monetary, organizational, and intellectual support for poverty solutions, has recently announced their student essay competition topic for the 2008-2009 school year. It’s not particularly simple, but the cause is a good and the payoff well worth the effort. One $10,000 prize and one $20,000 prize will be awarded to essay winners.

Before applying, students will have to watch “The Entrepreneur President, Paul Kagame of Rwanda,” and write a 2,000 word essay in response to the video. The writer will be assuming the role of President Kagame’s advisor and will have to put his vision into practice.

Prize:

1. One $10,000 undergraduate student scholarship 2. One $20,000 graduate student scholarship

Eligibility:

1. Applicant must be a full-time undergraduate or graduate student 2. Applicant must attend an accredited college or university worldwide.

Deadline:

December 7, 2008

Required Material:

1. A 2,000 word scholarship essay 2. A 100 word introductory abstract 3. The full name, address, phone number and academic email of the applicant 4. The degree level, major, and school contact number 5. A brief biography

Further details about the application process and about contacting the scholarship provider can be found by conducting a free college scholarship search. Once the search is completed, students eligible for the award will find it in their scholarship list.


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by Administrator

Scholarships are a great way to fund an education, but they aren’t the only way to do so. Students frequently need both money and experience before applying to schools. Whether you’re trying to sample work in your field of choice or attempting to acquire skills that will jumpstart your career, we can help. Check out the internships below for opportunities that can put money in your pocket and substance on your resume. For additional information about college scholarships, grants, fellowships and internships, try conducting a free college scholarship search. 

Women's Studio Workshop's Internship The Women’s Studio Workshop’s Internship gives young female artists the opportunity to learn the ins and outs of professional artistry. Housing and a $300/month stipend will be awarded.

Smithsonian Internships Minority undergraduate students and beginning graduate students are encouraged to apply for one of three summer internships. Students will be paid a $500 stipend for their research assistance and museum work.

SCA Internships The Student Conservation Association (SCA) offers conservation internships and summer trail crew positions to over 3,000 individuals each year. Projects vary in length from three to 12 months and trips are expense paid.

NCAA Athletic Internship College graduates interested in pursuing a career in the administrative side of athletics can gain insight into the business by taking advantage of this internship. This is a paid, on-year position.


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by Administrator

When you’re in school, book reports are worth little more than a headache. When you’re applying for college scholarships and grants, they're worth a lot of money---especially when you apply for The Foutainhead Essay Contest. Students who submit their essays can win up to $10,000! That’s a pretty good incentive to write, even if you’re not a fan of scholarship essay contests.

Before beginning, students will have to carefully read Ayn Rand’s The Fountainhead. Once they’re finished, they can choose between three book-related questions and write about their subject of choice. Myriad scholarship prizes are up for grabs.

Prize:

1. One $10,000 grand prize 2. Five $2,000 second prizes 3. Ten $1,000 third prizes 4. Forty-Five $100 prizes 5. One Hundred and Seventy-Five $50 prizes

Eligibility:

1. Applicants must be high school juniors or high school seniors. 2. Applicants may not be members or immediate family members of Ayn Rand Institute employees. 3. The essay must be the original work of the applicant. 4. Applicants may only submit one essay, and previous first-place winners may not reapply.

Deadline:

April 25, 2008 (must be postmarked by date)

Required Material:

1. A typed, double-spaced essay that is between 800 and 1,600 words in length.  2. A stapled cover sheet that includes the chosen topic number and the name, address, email, high school name/address and current grade level of the applicant.

Further details about the application process and about contacting the scholarship provider can be found by conducting a free college scholarship search. Once the search is completed, students eligible for the award will find it in their scholarship list. 


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by Administrator

People tend to associate high school booster club organizations with raising money to support sports programs and other extracurricular activities at the high school level. Parents who belong to booster clubs are often seen selling refreshments at high school sports events, collecting donations for silent auctions, and selling tickets for fundraisers.

It is true that high school booster clubs exist for the purpose of boosting funding for student programs. Many clubs also earmark some of their fundraising efforts to fund scholarships for deserving student athletes, band members and participants in other school-sponsored activities.

t is true that high school booster clubs exist for the purpose of boosting funding for student programs. Many clubs also earmark some of their fundraising efforts to fund scholarships for deserving student athletes, band members and participants in other school-sponsored activities.

High school booster club scholarship programs are school-specific, so criteria and awards vary greatly from one organization to the other. When you are researching scholarships based on extracurricular activities, don’t overlook the booster club at your school. Contact a booster club officer to find out details about scholarships offered, deadlines, and application procedures.


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