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by Christina Zhou

One of the things necessary for success in college is being a well-rounded person. No matter what career field you choose to enter, reading and writing is essential. Therefore, every college student should strive to read a wide variety of literature. Below are several popular and timeless books that every college student should read:

  • Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë. A classic coming of age story, many college students will identify with the young protagonist's struggles to figure out what she wants to do in life as well as learn that one should never abandon their principles, no matter the temptation.
  • The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot. Considered as one of the most important literary works of the 20th century, it has a multitude of confusing references and footnotes that are designed to obscure rather than illuminate meaning. The Waste Land shows both the tragedy and the hope of modern life.
  • The Odyssey by Homer. This classic epic of Odysseus’s fantastical and dangerous journey home to his family after the Trojan War has fascinated audiences for centuries. Odysseus must fight mystical creatures and endure the wrath of the gods while retaking the throne of Ithaca.
  • Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare. Although Shakespeare is well known for his tragedies like Hamlet and Romeo and Juliet, his comedic play Much Ado About Nothing is full of examples of clever word play as the two main characters throw verbal darts at each other. Even the title is a triple play on words!
  • The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. This hilarious and random galactic adventure involving several eccentric characters will find its way to your bookshelf and heart. A science fiction classic, it is the first of a series that reveal Adams' imaginative depiction of the future.
  • And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

If you've ever had to fill out a FAFSA for college, you may have felt as though you need an accounting degree to understand it, much less complete it. With over 130 questions and averaging 30 minutes to complete, the complexity and tedium of filing for financial aid has been a barrier for students in attending college or receiving the financial aid for which they qualify. The Department of Education announced an initiative Monday to simplify the process and beginning in October 2016, students and their families will be able to complete a simpler FAFSA application.

Currently, students must wait until after most college application deadlines to apply for federal aid - the new FAFSA amendments will enable application as early as October 1 and better align students with college deadlines. The current January 1 application opens after many college application periods have closed and students may not know their entire financial aid package before committing to a college. With the new amendments, students will have a better understanding of the actual cost of their college education. Federal Student Aid awards $150 billion in grants, loans and other types of financial assistance annually. Sadly, about 2 million students enrolled in college who would qualify for a Federal Pell Grant never applied for aid. With the new initiative, the plan to improve the process of applying for federal aid will include:

  • Earlier application - Information for the FAFSA will be readily available around the same time high school students are searching for, and applying to college, meaning less pressure and stress. The current FAFSA application opens January 1 and cannot be completed until after April 15, when tax forms are due.
  • Simpler application - A new data retrieval tool will allow applicants to electronically access tax information directly from the IRS, after filing their 2015 tax returns. This means less income estimates and errors and more accuracy.
  • More students assisted - It is estimated that hundreds of thousands of students, especially first-generation and minority students, will apply for and enroll in college as a result of a simpler FAFSA. In 2013, roughly $45 million was left on the table in Pell Grants due to the complexity of the application.
  • More colleges assisted - As many as 3 million hours are spent annually by colleges and universities verifying FAFSA Information. With the new data retrieval tool from the IRS, colleges and universities will have less trouble verifying tax return information.
  • Do you think the new amendments to the current FAFSA will benefit students as they apply for financial aid earlier and with a simpler application? If you are interested in learning more about FAFSA, federal aid, grants and scholarships, read some of our tips on funding your college education.

    Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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    by Susan Dutca

    All was quiet on DePauw University's campus in Greencastle, Indiana on Wednesday until a group of Bible-carrying protesters arrived, shouting that students who engaged in "unholy behaviors," including homosexuality, excessive sexuality, drug and alcohol use, and masturbating, were going to hell. The group of confrontational evangelists, also known as "Bro. Jed's School of Evangelism" Campus Ministry USA, are allegedly known for organizing campus protests and are not affiliated with a particular church. Students ignored the protest at first but soon hundreds of students gathered, bringing gay pride flags and chanting "we have nothing to lose but our chains."

    Protestors spewed slurs to students and passersby, calling men "evil" and women promiscuous as well as asking students how many STDs they had. DePauw University's president and student government representatives appeared as well to support students. President Brian Casey organized a campus gathering in Ubben Quad that same day to have students "show solidarity and support for one another." In his mass email, he acknowledged the First Amendment which "guarantees the right to free speech on public grounds - even for messages filled with hate and animosity." Initially, students had tried ignoring the protestors by not giving them a reaction; the demonstration intensified with speakers, music and a growing crowd. Only two students were detained, including one who threw coffee at the protestors and no one was arrested. Protestors were escorted off campus around 1:50 pm and the crowd slowly trickled away. The protests are suspected to have been held in opposition to Bi Visibility Day, observed September 23rd.

    Do you think the First Amendment protects the group's demonstration? Was the protest handled appropriately? Leave us your thoughts in the comment section. And if you're passionate about protecting people's rights, check out some of our law scholarships.

    And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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    by Christina Zhou

    Although schools are becoming increasingly diverse with its food options, the situation is still fairly grim for those who have special dietary considerations. Foods with strong dietary specifications, such as vegetarianism or religious dietary products, can be difficult to come by and usually do not have many options. However, this deficit can be resolved with the following tips:

    • Stock up on stock. For many, buying the raw ingredients for the foods that they want to eat is unfeasible both practically and financially. However, soups are both easy to prepare and cheap to buy. Additionally, they keep fresh for a long time and can be bought in bulk.
    • Join a group. Nowadays, you can find almost any sort of club you want on a college campus. Try finding a group out there that fits your needs. These sorts of clubs often have get-togethers with opportunities for free food. This way, you have easy access to the foods you need and can bond with other students.
    • Bring snacks. Look into nearby stores and see if you can find options there. Simple things like dried fruit and granola bars are usually cheap and keep fresh for a long time. If you live close enough, you can also try to bring some food supplies from home.
    • Seek out advice resources. There are many nutrition and food services available for students, including dining services and student health. Ask about feasible options nearby as well as nutritional information. Additionally, take advantage of the most underused resource: current students. Talk to them and find out what they do to get around these dining problems. This goes for many other situations as well. The upperclassmen have gone through the same college struggles as you, and are usually more than happy to give advice.
    • And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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    by Susan Dutca

    In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month, Scholarships.com is celebrating the heritage, culture and contributions of Hispanic and Latino Americans from September 15 to October 15. Not only have Hispanics and Latinos made a profound and positive influence on the U.S. through their strong devotion to family, work, and education, but they have helped shape the national character through their rich, culturally-diverse and multiethnic traditions. In recognition of Hispanic and Latino students' hard work and contributions, we have compiled a list of scholarships to provide further opportunities for higher education and academic success. Explore these and more scholarships as we aim to further the accomplishments and success of the Hispanic and Latino population:

    Gates Millennium Scholars Program

    Deadline: January 13, 2016
    Available to: College freshman
    Maximum Award: Varies

    Funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Gates Millennium Scholars Program was established to provide outstanding African American, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian Pacific Islander American, and Hispanic American students with an opportunity to complete an undergraduate college education. Continuing Gates Millennium Scholars may request funding for a graduate degree program in: computer science, education, engineering, library science, mathematics, public health or science.

    A minimum high school GPA of 3.3 or GED-equivalent is required. Applicants must have demonstrated leadership abilities through community service or extracurricular activities, and is enrolling for the first time at a U.S. accredited college or university as a full-time, degree-seeking, first-year student.

    For more information and to apply, please visit Gates Millennium Scholars Program

    AMS Minority Scholarship

    Deadline: February 2, 2016
    Available to: High school graduates, rising college freshman
    Maximum Award: $6,000

    The AMS Minority Scholarships awards minority students who have been traditionally underrepresented in the sciences, especially Hispanic, Native American, and Black/African American students.

    Students must plan to pursue careers in the atmospheric or related oceanic and hydrologic sciences. Marine Biology is not eligible. The $6,000 two-year scholarship is for $3,000 per year during freshman and sophomore years.

    For more information and to apply, please visit AMS Minority Scholarship

    Surety and Fidelity Industry Intern and Scholarship Program for Minority Students

    Deadline: January 1, 2016
    Available to: College freshman through college juniors
    Maximum Award: $5,000

    The Surety and Fidelity Industry Intern and Scholarship Program for Minority Students provides awards of up to $5,000 to outstanding minority students to support their studies in the areas of insurance/risk management, accounting, or business/finance.

    Students must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 and have satisfactorily completed at least 30 semester hours, equivalent college work including at least 6 semester hours in his/her declared major.

    For more information and to apply, please visit Surety and Fidelity Industry Intern and Scholarship Program for Minority Students

    Xerox Technical Minority Scholarship

    Deadline: September 30, 2015
    Available to: Undergraduate through graduate students
    Maximum Award: $10,000

    Xerox is committed to the academic success of all minority students. The Technical Minority Scholarship awards between $1,000 and $10,000 to qualified minorities enrolled in a technical degree program at the bachelor level or above.

    Applicants must maintain a 3.0 GPA or better to qualify and pursue a degree in a technical field. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or visa-holding permanent residents of African American, Asian, Pacific Island, Native American, Native Alaskan, or Hispanic descent.

    For more information and to apply, please visit Xerox Technical Minority Scholarship

    Minority Teachers of Illinois Scholarship Program

    Deadline: Varies
    Available to: High school seniors through college juniors
    Maximum Award: $5,000

    If you plan to become a preschool, elementary or secondary school teacher and are of African American/Black, Hispanic American, Asian American or Native American origin, you may qualify for up to $5,000 per year as part of the Minority Teachers of Illinois (MTI) Scholarship Program to pay for tuition, fees and room and board, or commuter allowances, if applicable.

    Students must maintain at least a 2.5 GPA and must teach in Illinois. If this teaching commitment is not fulfilled, the scholarship converts to a loan and you must repay the entire amount plus interest.

    For more information and to apply, please visit Minority Teachers of Illinois Scholarship Program

    The LAGRANT Foundation Undergraduate Scholarships

    Deadline: February 29, 2016
    Available to: College freshman through college seniors
    Maximum Award: $2,500

    The LAGRANT Foundation annually provides 15 scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students who are attending accredited institutions and are pursuing careers in the fields of advertising, marketing or public relations.

    Applicants must be undergraduate students and either a U.S. citizen or permanent resident identifying in one of the following ethnic groups: African American, Asian/Pacific Islander, Hispanic or Native American. Students must have a minimum 2.75 GPA and must major in a field of study that has an emphasis on advertising, marketing, public relations or in anthropology, art, communications, English, graphic design, sociology while maintaining a career focus in advertising, marketing or public relations.

    For more information and to apply, please visit The LAGRANT Foundation Undergraduate Scholarships

    AAAS Minority Science Writers Internship

    Deadline: March 1, 2016
    Available to: College freshman through college seniors
    Maximum Award: Varies

    AAAS offers the Minority Science Writers Internship for students who are interested in pursuing a career in science journalism. The internship will take place in the summer at the Washington, D.C., headquarters of AAAS's Science magazine, the largest interdisciplinary journal in the world. Interns will spend 10 weeks at Science under the guidance of award-winning reporters and editors, and have a chance to experience what science writers do for a living.

    For more information and to apply, please visit AAAS Minority Science Writers Internship

    National GEM Consortium Fellowships

    Deadline: November 11, 2015
    Available to: Graduate students
    Maximum Award: $16,000

    GEM offers MS and Ph.D. level students an outstanding opportunity and access to dozens of the top Engineering and Science firms and Universities in the nation. The GEM Fellowship was designed to focus on promoting opportunities for individuals to enter industry at the graduate level in areas such as research and development, product development, and other high level technical careers. GEM also offers exposure opportunities to a number of opportunities in academe. GEM provides three fellowship programs: MS Engineering, Ph.D. Engineering and Ph.D. Science.

    These fellowship opportunities are for students pursuing a master's degree or doctorate in science, engineering or a closely related field. Applicants are required to submit transcripts and three letters of recommendation.

    For more information and to apply, please visit National GEM Consortium Fellowships

    APSA Minority Fellowship Program

    Deadline: October 23, 2015
    Available to: College seniors through graduate students
    Maximum Award: $4,000

    The Minority Fellows program is designed primarily for minority students applying to enter a doctoral program in political science for the first time. Applicants must be members of one of the following racial/ethnic minority groups: African Americans, Asian Pacific Americans, Latinos/as, and Native Americans.

    Applicants must demonstrate financial need and must demonstrate an interest in teaching and potential research in political science.

    For more information and to apply, please visit APSA Minority Fellowship Program

    Actuarial Diversity Scholarship

    Deadline: May 1, 2016
    Available to: High school seniors through college seniors
    Maximum Award: $4,000

    The Actuarial Diversity Scholarship promotes diversity within the profession through an annual scholarship program for Black/African American, Hispanic, Native North American and Pacific Islander students. Applicants must intend on pursuing a career in the actuarial profession and be a full-time undergraduate student at a U.S. accredited educational institution. For more information and to apply, please visit Actuarial Diversity Scholarship

    And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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    by Susan Dutca

    Found on Delta State University's school website is a picture of fellow professors Ethan Schmidt and Shannon side by side, smiling at a 2013 holiday party. That same year, Schmidt mentioned Lamb in the acknowledgements of his book "Native Americans in the American Revolution." Now, both professors are dead after Dr. Schmidt was shot in his office at Delta State Monday morning and suspect Lamb died from a self-inflicted wound while evading police, stating he's "not going to jail." Lamb was also a suspect in the earlier homicide of his domestic partner Amy Prentiss, at their home roughly 300 miles south of Delta State. Cleveland Police Chief Charles Bingham claims there is no known motive at the time being - Lamb allegedly believed Prentiss was romantically involved with Schmidt but there is no current evidence of a love triangle.

    The manhunt for Lamb continued throughout the day Monday and ended when police had spotted Lamb exiting his vehicle and fleeing into the woods. After hearing a single gunshot ring, police found Lamb's body with a gunshot wound to the head. Up until this time, Delta University and all local schools were sent into lockdown, urging students and faculty members to remain indoors and away from windows.

    Lamb received his doctorate in education from Delta State University in 2015 and had worked at the university since 2009, teaching geography and education courses. Schmidt received his doctorate from the University of Kansas in Colonial America and Indigenous people and specialized in American history. According to the university's president, Schmidt was a "star" of the faculty. Schmidt is lauded for being one of the "brightest students" at his alma mater, Emporia State, and was "on the road to being one of the great scholars of American history."

    The campus lockdown was lifted late Monday, and Tuesday classes were cancelled in order to hold a vigil in honor of the staff member's death.

    Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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    by Christina Zhou

    When it comes to choosing extracurricular activities, many students are concerned about whether or not the activity will look good on college applications. They end up either changing activities without commitment or stick with an activity that they don't particularly enjoy, but believe will look good to colleges. However, working or getting involved in clubs and sports can and should be fun! Below is a list of tips as to how you should approach high school extracurricular activities to help you obtain that much-desired college acceptance.

    • Join early. Building strong extracurricular activities takes time. Being in the program for a longer amount of time allows for more experience and better chances of obtaining leadership roles.
    • Think quality, not quantity. Someone who spent four years in their school's jazz band and was the first chair of their section will look more dedicated than someone who was in fifteen clubs but never did much more than attend meetings. Try to obtain leadership roles in whatever extracurricular activities you choose.
    • Pursue your passions. You may think your hobbies are too weird to impress colleges, but that's false. If you show enough dedication to an activity, whether it be basketball or making duct tape art, colleges will be interested. Remember, interviews are an important part of the college admissions process, and you will be asked to elaborate on your extracurricular activities. If you dislike what you do, it will show.
    • Don't forget about school! Although extracurricular activities are vital, grades and standardized test scores are also incredibly important. Be involved, but make sure to leave enough time for studying, as well as for some free time. Although it may feel like it sometimes, your time in high school does not need to be a non-stop pursuit of acceptance to college.
    • And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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    by Susan Dutca

    It's move-in day, and some students at the University of South Florida-Saint Petersburg are settling into their new college hotels. Due to housing overflow of upperclassmen at the USFSP campus since 2011, the Hilton has partnered with the university and has made it the permanent Residence Hall Hilton. With amenities such as access to all hotel facilities, weekly linen and cleaning service, as well as other accessories students would otherwise need to bring to the USFSP campus, students are a three-minute drive and eight-minute walk from the campus. However, not all students are pleased with the detached feeling of living away from their peers and campus.

    While it costs roughly $3,171-$3,784 per semester to board at USFSP, the RHH is substantially more expensive at $4,984 per semester. Students have different opinions on the unique living arrangement. Freshman Tiffany Bautista complains, "I have to walk all the way to the dorms to do my laundry. It is so tedious having to carry all my laundry to another building," but still claims that "I feel like it hasn’t changed my social life." Others fear the distance makes them just a student "taking classes and then going back to the Holiday Inn." Schools including College of Charleston, Texas Southern, University of Vermont and Paine College have adopted similar living arrangements, but not all are long-term options.

    Would you pay for off-campus, non-traditional housing such as a hotel? On top of paying for housing, dormitory experiences can go awry, so read some of our tips on roommates and communal living to better prepare yourself for the unexpected. Check to see what scholarships your college state offers to alleviate the cost of tuition and attendance.

    Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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    by Susan Dutca

    We've all heard the phrases, "man up" or "be a man," but what exactly does it mean to be a man? Through the Margaret Cuninggim Women's Center, Vanderbilt University will host "Healthy Masculinities Week." There will be a series of lectures and discussion panels to educate males on the politically correct way to be masculine. Other discussions will include: "Maintaining Bro Status" which investigates issues of masculinity and mental health as they pertain to fraternities, "Masculinity XXL" which addresses the flawed portrayal of manhood in Magic Mike XXL, and "Policing Masculinity in the Gay and Bi Communities."

    The event flier depicts a shadowed male and his thought bubble, which houses keywords such as "don't cry," "man up," "have sex," "play sports," and "major in business." The intent of the program is to critically explore "how boys and men are pressured to behave…to consider that sometimes masculine norms harm men who aren't always taught that emotional vulnerability, cooperation, and sensitivity are valuable human traits." The event will be started with "The Macho Paradox: Why Some Men Hurt [Women] and How All Men Can Help," featuring author Jackson Katz. However, not everyone supports women teaching men how to be better men - especially when hosted by a strongly feminist organization, as evidenced by mrcTV.

    Do you believe this event would promote better understanding of the social normative surrounding masculinity, as hosted by the Women's Center? Also, if you have a passion for women studies, sociology, anthropology or the like, see how much free money you can earn in scholarships for your high education dreams.

    And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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    College Classes , College News , Scholarships

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    by Susan Dutca

    While many people can recall their college days as being "the best days" of their lives, college is never stress-free. From completing last-minute papers, to studying for midterms and finals or dealing with a stressful breakup, students are expected to balance many social, academic and extracurricular responsibilities. For some, there are many positive lessons to be learned from the college experience, but the 2014 National Survey of College Counseling Centers reports a drastic increase in college students with severe psychological problems. Colleges now have trouble keeping up with the demand for mental health services. Up to 83 percent of colleges may deny treatment for students who possess problems beyond the capabilities of the staff. To tackle the issue, Drexel University has taken initiative in reaching out to struggling students by installing mental-health kiosks on campus.

    Drexel University, the first U.S. college to install a "mental health kiosk," uses a high-tech, polarized device similar to a tablet computer and is stationed in the highly-populated Student Recreation Center. Using touch-screen technology, students, faculty/professional staff and even members of the general public are able to stop and "Get a Check-up from the Neck-up." The program goes through a series of questions that assesses individuals' state of mind and feelings, generates a "suggested result" and provides referral information based on the respondent's answers. It screens for six potential issues: depression, post-traumatic stress, bipolar disorder, alcohol use, eating disorder, and anxiety. When it comes professional training, The Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors reports that 58.5 percent of colleges offer insufficient formal or informal training. With this new technology, Drexel's Associate Dean in the Office of Counseling and Health hopes that high-risk students will be better assisted.

    Funded by a $5,000 grant through the Thomas Scattergood Behavior Health Foundation in Philadelphia, the mental health kiosk is the second debuted in Philadelphia. Do you think this would be effective in tackling issues of increased mental health issues amongst college students? Also, do you have the requisite patience and empathy to help those suffering from mental or other disorders? If you have a passion for helping people, check out scholarships for Psychology or Social Work such as the Health Careers Scholarship and find free money to fund your college dreams.

    Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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