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by Susan Dutca

Toronto native of Ethiopian descent Abel Tesfaye, better known as The Weeknd, will help bring more feel for Ethiopian culture at the University of Toronto. He recently donated $50K towards a new program that will teach Ethiopian history and language. Check out these scholarships designated for students of Ethiopian and African descent:

  1. Least Developed Countries Scholarship

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: $20,000

  2. Blacks at Microsoft Scholarship

    Deadline: March 1
    Maximum Award: $20,000

  3. The MasterCard Foundation Undergraduate Scholars Program

    Deadline: January 4
    Maximum Award: Varies

  4. Angels Over Africa Mission Scholarship

    Deadline: April 8
    Maximum Award: Varies

  5. The MasterCard Foundation Graduate Scholars Program

    Deadline: February 1
    Maximum Award: Varies

  6. EADB Math, Science, Technology, & Engineering University Scholarship Program

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: Varies

  7. Kennedy-Lugar YES Program

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: Varies

  8. The Fulbright Program

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: Varies

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Scholarships.com Staff

While Moraine Valley Community College still plans to offer sections of its College 101 course for specific populations, it will no longer be available only to specific racial groups.

In the past, MVCC, located about 25 miles from Chicago in Palos Hills, has offered such courses to athletes, special needs students and other groups that it was felt might benefit from such an offering. Research has shown such courses can be particularly effective for low-income and first-generation college students and due to the considerably lower retention and completion rates among African-American students, a course specifically for that demographic was planned. However, the college has reversed course on their plan for such an offering, perhaps due to backlash from the community regarding singling out a specific race to which they would offer a course section. While research may support the action, the offering of a course to a specific race, thereby excluding other races from taking the course might appear discriminatory, irrespective of the good intentions employed by those planning the course and determining to whom it should be offered.

What do you think? Is it acceptable for a school to offer courses to specific races? Genders? Was MVCC right to reverse their decision to offer the course to only African-American students?

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

Only African American students will be allowed to enroll in certain sections of a mandatory introductory course at Moraine Valley Community College. The segregated course - similar to ones that are only open to veterans, special needs, and older students - is intended to help students feel more "comfortable." While registering, some parents found this exclusionary act alarming.

For years, Moraine Valley has offered College 101 "exclusively to groups such as athletes and those with special needs." Courses such as these are effective for low-income, first-generation and similar students, where they can build network systems with people of similar backgrounds. The other restricted course available only to African American students is titled "College: Changes, Challenges, Choice."

The data-driven decision is nothing new for the college, according to the college's Vice President for Institutional Development. She states that "this is not something new for us. We've done [courses for] veterans, we've done women, we have done Hispanics...we find that these particular courses with these particular groups with our mentoring and peer support help them to be more successful than they would be if they did not have this particular experience."

One parent wrote to the Chicago Tribune's opinion page that their Moraine Valley son wanted to know "why there are not two sections limited to Asian-American students? How about Native American students?" Some administrators argue that "limiting course sections to a particular racial or ethnic group could diminish the image of those classes, whereas experiencing other viewpoints and backgrounds improves tolerance among all groups."

Sectioned courses focus on the specific issues encountered by various groups. For example, veterans face a specific set of challenges that may not be experienced by non-veterans. Moraine Valley's Assistant Director of Communications claims that "students feel comfortable [in these settings] and are more likely to open up because they're with other students who are like them."

In your opinion, should these courses exist? Why or why not? Share with us your thoughtful opinions, and don't forget to check out scholarships by type.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

J.K. Rowling plans to end the Harry Potter series with her latest "Harry Potter and the Curse Child." For the next generation of talented and creative writers, here are some literature and creative writing based scholarships to help pay for college:

  1. Helen McCloy Mystery Writers of America Scholarship

    Deadline: February 28
    Maximum Award: $500

  2. Diverse Minds Writing Challenge

    Deadline: March 11
    Maximum Award: $5,000

  3. The Kurt Brown Fellowship for Diverse Voices

    Deadline: March 11
    Maximum Award: $1,000

  4. Hope College Creative Writing Award

    Deadline: February 15
    Maximum Award: $10,000

  5. The Leo W. and Alberta V. Thomas Utz Scholarship

    Deadline: February 10
    Maximum Award: $16,000

  6. CINTAS Foundation Fellowship in Creative Writingp

    Deadline: July 1
    Maximum Award: Varies

  7. Calliope Workshop and MFA Scholarship

    Deadline: May 31
    Maximum Award: $3,000

  8. L. Ron Hubbard Writers of The Future Contest

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: $5,000

  9. GRCF Ladies Literary Club Scholarship

    Deadline: April 1
    Maximum Award: Varies

  10. New York Women in Communications Inc. Foundation Scholarship Program

    Deadline: January 31
    Maximum Award: Varies

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

Texas college students can now stroll campuses, university buildings, classrooms and dorms with textbooks, supplies and...guns in their possession. The new state law permits students with concealed carry licenses to carry their guns at all public colleges and universities in the state. The Texas law took effect on the 50th anniversary of the UT Tower massacre.

Under the controversial new law, students who are at least 21 years old and have a concealed carry license will be able to carry a gun with the exception of some facilities such as sports arenas and chemical labs. The new law will not go into effect at private and two-year community colleges until next year. What prompted the recent change? Due to an increase in mass shootings - many of which took place on college campuses - proponents believe that a more armed student body "might be able to prevent such incidents." Additionally, supporters claim that "no [gun control] law would stop someone from simply walking onto campus with a gun." Those who oppose it fear that it will only lead to more violence, stating that "a university is a battleground of words and ideas, and not of weapons."

Texas isn't the only state permitting students to conceal carry - eight others have already implemented the law, including Arkansas, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Mississippi, Oregon, Utah, Tennessee, and Wisconsin. Given that the new law is only applicable to a small percentage of the student body who are of age, the university "estimates that less than 1 percent fit the criteria" to carry. Initially, the University of Texas lobbied against the new law and although university presidents have some power to regulate concealed carry on their campuses, they are fairly restricted. The law states that "any rules or regulations instituted by the university may not 'generally prohibit' license holders to carry their concealed firearms on campus."

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

The University of Wisconsin - Green Bay is offering a course to educate students on the environmental justice movement, and it's titled "Green Lives Matter." From topics of flint lead contamination to migrant farm worker pesticide exposure, the program "argues the effects of capitalism force poor and minority community to live in dangerous and unhealthy situations". If you have a passion for environmental science, engineering or food science, check out these green scholarships:

  1. Albuquerque Ecologist Open Space Scholarship

    Deadline: December 31
    Maximum Award: $500

  2. Beulah Frey Environmental Scholarship

    Deadline: March 31
    Maximum Award: $1,000

  3. Colorado Garden Show Scholarship

    Deadline: March 15
    Maximum Award: Varies

  4. Ecotrust Native American Scholarship

    Deadline: May 31
    Maximum Award: $2,250

  5. Elmhurst Garden Club Scholarship

    Deadline: May 15
    Maximum Award: Varies

  6. Alabama Environmental Health Association Scholarship

    Deadline: February 25
    Maximum Award: $1,000

  7. Freehold Soil Conservation Scholarship

    Deadline: May 13
    Maximum Award: $2,000

  8. Girls Impact the World Film Festival Green IS Award

    Deadline: March 1
    Maximum Award: $2,500

  9. National Park Service Fellowship

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: Varies

  10. RTK Scholars Program

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: $1,000

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

Native American students lag behind their peers from a young age, across almost every measure of student success. From college enrollment, to test scores and on-time graduation, they have the lowest rates of any racial subgroup. They make up a mere 1 percent of the high school and college population and tend to be overlooked when it comes to discussion about the nation's achievement gap.

American Indian and Alaska Native Students have the highest drop-out rate - at 11.3 percent, which is nearly double the national average - the lowest graduation rate, are the least likely to enroll in college, and the second least likely to graduate on time. Native American tribal communities are not only small and young but also poor, with the median household income as low as $30,000 for some tribes. Stricken by poverty, joblessness, addiction, and abuse, they are "at the heart of the worst educational outcomes in the country."

Issues in Native Americans' education go back to the post-Civil War, when the U.S. government forced Native American children into boarding schools to make them more "civilized." Despite the White House's attempts to help by transferring more control over the schools to the tribes, they are "met with skepticism" because the government has "zero credibility with them. They see [the government] as the devil." Even with the 2001 No Child Left Behind Act, "longstanding gaps" between minority students and white students dissipated while the Native students stagnated; their ACT scores reached a five-year low.

Some successful students have cited Tribal colleges as their saving grace. Rather than attending at a mainstream institution and theorizing what it means to be Native American, they can go to tribal colleges and live it. Furthermore, they are surrounded by students from other tribes and are educated on the issues pervasive in tribal communities such as economic development, justice, and health care. Many Native American students hope to return to their communities and make a difference, as well as "build tribal capacity" and leadership for education reform.

Many colleges and universities actively seek and admit Native American students to their schools, cognizant of the disparity and achievement gap. Furthermore, they are generous in their funding through Native American scholarships.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

Colleges and universities across the nation are starting to engage more in discussions regarding what it means to be a man. Masculinity, just like femininity, is celebrated through these gender-specific scholarships. So man-up and check out these scholarship opportunities!:

  1. Colored Rocks Contest

    Deadline: January 4
    Maximum Award: $3,500

  2. Dr. Dan J. and Patricia S. Pickard Scholarship

    Deadline: Mary 31
    Maximum Award: $1,000

  3. Lax Scholarship Fund for Gay Men

    Deadline: February 1
    Maximum Award: $8,000

  4. The Iris-Samuel Rothman Scholarship

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: Varies

  5. The Mervyn Sluizer, Jr. Scholarship

    Deadline: May 2
    Maximum Award: $1,000

  6. The True Gentlemen Scholarship

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: $1,500

  7. USBC Chuck Hall Star of Tomorrow

    Deadline: December 1
    Maximum Award: $6,000

  8. Winston Churchill Foundation of the USA Churchill Scholarship Program

    Deadline: November 8
    Maximum Award: Varies

  9. ALA - LITA/LSSI Scholarship

    Deadline: March 1
    Maximum Award: $2,500

  10. Bernie Varnadore Scholarship Program

    Deadline: April 1
    Maximum Award: $1,250

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

President Obama gets paid $400,000 per year to serve as President of the United States of America. Many college presidents get paid more for running a school than they would for being the leader of the free world, according to a new report from the Chronicle of Higher Education. Presidents at public universities received a median salary of $431,000 in the 2015 fiscal year, with a 4.3 percent increase. Five presidents have even entered the "million-dollar club", earning as much as $1.3 million annually. While the pay might be quite generous, being a college president has quickly become a job that's very hard to keep.

High-profile resignations or firings are becoming commonplace in the world of higher education. From heated race issues to sexual assault cases, being a college or university president has become more complex than it was a decade ago, according to The Washington Post. In addition to administrative responsibilities, presidents are increasingly responsible for pleasing alumni, faculty, and students because, "at any one time, one of those groups is upset about something." The University of Houston's President Renu Khato earned the highest salary at $1.3 million in 2015. Former University of Oregon President Mark Gottfredson followed with a total compensation of $1,215,142 and an additional $940,000 severance payout after he resigned amid controversy over the school's mishandling of a sexual assault case.

College presidents are taking on different roles, and future leadership may require individuals who don't necessarily follow "typical pathways through academia" and who don't come from traditional backgrounds. Candidates may need to keep up with evolving trends in teaching, learning and technology as well as being well-versed in finances as opposed to following conventional academic careers such as scholars, professors, and researchers. Only 30 percent of sitting provosts actually want to become a college president which is daunting, considering many of current college and university presidents are expected to retire. Who will rise up to the high-pay, high-turnover challenge?

In your opinion, should college and university residents get paid such high salaries or take a pay cut? Leave us your thoughtful comments below.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

Whether you consider them disabilities, conditions, challenges or simple differences, there are quite a few scholarships out there for people dealing with everything from ADHD to diabetes to narcolepsy. Check out these featured scholarships and more at Scholarships.com!:

  1. Allegra Ford Thomas Scholarship

    Deadline: November 13
    Maximum Award: $2,500

  2. AAHD Frederick J. Krause Scholarship on Health and Disability

    Deadline: November 15
    Maximum Award: $1,000

  3. CHASA Scholarship for Childhood Stroke Survivors

    Deadline: August 31
    Maximum Award: $3,000

  4. Faith Hope and Love Jesus, Inc. College Scholarship

    Deadline: May 1
    Maximum Award: $500

  5. Google Lime Scholarship for Students with Disabilities

    Deadline: December 6
    Maximum Award: $10,000

  6. Joshua Gomes Memorial Scholarship Fund

    Deadline: July 15
    Maximum Award: $1,000

  7. Marcus Raper Zimmerman Fund

    Deadline: August 15
    Maximum Award: Varies

  8. The Anne Ford Scholarship

    Deadline: November 13
    Maximum Award: $10,000

  9. The Guthrie-Koch PKU Scholarship

    Deadline: October 15
    Maximum Award: $2,000

  10. RCF, Inc. Mansfield Noon Lions Club Scholarship Fund

    Deadline: April 1
    Maximum Award: Varies

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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