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by Susan Dutca

November is National Scholarship Month, referred to by the National Scholarship Providers Association, and just so happens to be our favorite month of the year! This month is a special time to raise awareness of scholarship opportunities for current and future college students. Also, it's an excellent time to begin your scholarship search if you have not done so already. To help you in your search, we have compiled a list of scholarships with end-of-the-year deadlines, as well as scholarships for next year, so as to help you apply before the year is over. Dedicate some time to applying for current and coming academic years with these scholarships:

Arizona Milk Producers Scholarship

Deadline: November 9, 2015
Available to: High school seniors – college seniors
Maximum Award: $12,000

Is your 'stache worth the cash? Dairy plays an important role in fueling active minds and bodies, and can now help you earn a college scholarship. Simply take a picture of your best milk mustache for the chance to win a top $12,000 scholarship.

You must be enrolled or plan to enroll in an Arizona university as a full-time students to qualify. Make sure you are the only one in the photo and that a diary product is clearly visible in the photo. Upload your photo to Instagram and tag @azmilkproducers using the hashtag #ampscholarshipcontest and #ASU, #NAU or #UofA.

For more information and to apply, please visit Arizona Milk Producers Scholarship

The Resolve to Evolve Scholarship

Deadline: December 9, 2015
Available to: Scholarships.com Members
Maximum Award: $2,000

The Resolve to Evolve Scholarship is about more than just making resolutions - it's about creating change and furthering our evolution as individuals and a society. Applicants must write an essay of no more than 5,000 characters, addressing a two-part question.

All applicants must be registered members of Scholarships.com in order to qualify. If you have not already registered, go to the Scholarships.com home page and register now for free.

For more information and to apply, please visit The Resolve to Evolve Scholarship

Our World-Underwater Society Rolex Scholarship

Deadline: December 31, 2015
Available to: Graduate students ages 21-26
Maximum Award: $25,000

Our World-Underwater Scholarship Society has provided firsthand experiences in underwater-related disciplines to young people considering careers in the underwater world. Each year a Rolex scholar is selected to work with leaders in marine-related fields. Scholars partake in endeavors ranging from scientific expeditions to laboratory assignments.

Students must not have earned a graduate degree and have not chosen a clearly defined career path, as well as be between the ages of 21 and 26.

Students must have certification as a Rescue Diver or equivalent with a minimum of 25 dives within the past two years.

For more information and to apply, please visit Our World-Underwater Society Rolex Scholarship

Doodle 4 Google Art Competition

Deadline: December 7, 2015
Available to: Ages 5-18
Maximum Award: Up to $30,000

From cave paintings to selfies, artists have always found creative ways of expressing themselves. Google is asking young students to use their homepage as a canvas by doodling with any materials to show what makes them unique.

The winner's artwork will be featured on the Google homepage for a day, and one national winner will also receive a $40,000 scholarship. Students in grades K-12 are invited to participate and must incorporate the letters G-O-O-G-L-E.

For more information and to apply, please visit Doodle 4 Google Art Competition

The Center for Alcohol Policy Essay Contest

Deadline: December 5, 2015
Available to: 18 years and older
Maximum Award: $5,000

This year's essay topic for The Center of Alcohol Policy's contest is: "This year marks the 10 year anniversary of the Supreme Court's Granholm decision, which ruled against two states' laws that discriminated against out-of-state alcohol producers but also affirmed that "The three-tier system is unquestionably legitimate." How has this "unquestionably legitimate" system fostered competition, increased new products available to consumers and worked to protect consumers and the public?"

Applicants must be 18 years or older to apply and may email or postmark their essays.

For more information and to apply, please visit The Center for Alcohol Policy Essay Contest

The Anne Ford Scholarship

Deadline: December 15, 2015
Available to: Graduating high school seniors
Maximum Award: $10,000

The Anne Ford Scholarship is a $10,000 scholarship to a graduating high school senior with a documented learning disability who will be enrolled in a full-time bachelor's degree program.

Students must demonstrate financial need and provide current documentation of an identified learning disability. Must maintain a 3.0 GPA or higher and must be able to articulate his/her learning disability and demonstrate the importance of self-advocacy.

For more information and to apply, please visit The Anne Ford Scholarship

Colored Rocks Contest

Deadline: December 4, 2015
Available to: Graduating high school seniors
Maximum Award: $3,500

The Colored Rocks Foundation annually awards 15 high-achieving senior male high school students from diverse ethnic backgrounds who have committed to help at least one of their struggling peers achieve their high school diploma.

Applicants must answer a 2-part essay (500-1,000 words) and submit a community project plan. Applicants must attend and graduate from a high school in Georgia to be eligible for the award.

For more information and to apply, please visit Colored Rocks Contest

Hispanic Annual Salute Award

Deadline: December 4, 2015
Available to: Graduating high school seniors
Maximum Award: $2,000

Hispanic Annual Salute offers scholarship to Hispanic youth who exhibit and encourage volunteerism. The goal is to provide students an opportunity to continue their education beyond high school.

Students must graduate from high school, maintain a 2.5 GPA or higher and perform notable volunteer contribution in the Hispanic community, specifically unpaid volunteer activity not related to fulfilling a school requirement. Applicants must reside in Colorado.

For more information and to apply, please visit Hispanic Annual Salute Award

Burger King Scholar Program

Deadline: December 15, 2015
Available to: Graduating high school seniors
Maximum Award: $1,000

Created in memory of Burger King’s Co-founder James “Jim” W. McLamore, the Burger King Scholars program awards students who have a strong academic record with a minimum 2.0 GPA. Students should be passionate about serving their community and be a high school senior, BK employee, spouse/domestic partner or child of an employee.

High school students should be graduating seniors who plan on attending a two- or four-year accredited university.

For more information and to apply, please visit Burger King Scholar Program

Cancer for College Scholarships

Deadline: January 31, 2016
Available to: Undergraduate students
Maximum Award:$16,000

No child should ever have to deal with cancer. That is why Cancer for College provides hope and inspiration to cancer survivors in the form of college scholarships. Applicants must be a cancer patient or cancer survivor to be eligible and must be a US resident enrolled in an accredited university or community college.

Cancer for College offers several different scholarships so make sure to read the eligibility and criteria requirements for each before applying.

For more information and to apply, please visit Cancer for College Scholarships

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

To help tackle the issue of rising tuition costs, thousands of British students are paying for college by using "sugar daddy" websites. One particular site, SeekingArrangement.com, has 12,600 UK students signed up with proof of college enrollment. Their motto? "You + SeekingArrangement = No College Debt." SeekingArrangment is a way for "beautiful, ambitious people to graduate debt free" through "arrangements with older sponsors." Is the world of "sugar daddy" relationships a mutually beneficial dating experience, or just another term for "sex work"?

According to Fox News, users claim there is a huge difference between "providing company for men" to support their college education and prostitution. According to one 20-year-old student on SeekingArrangement.com, she earns $2,000 a month from the "sexual arrangement." She claims, "I've saved quite a lot. It pays for my travel, my books, and I haven't had to take out a student loan. I've been quite well off.” Brandon Wade, the founder of SeekingArrangements.com, believes it enables "sugar babies" to "upgrade their lifestyle" and is therefore not an escort service. Wade claims sex was never expected, neither were the countless marriages worldwide that resulted from the pairings. "You want to find somebody who is well educated and who can provide for you financially, you know, so it's sort of the Disney dream per say," claims Wade.

However, for one married 62-year-old sugar daddy who is currently seeing four sugar babies, "sex is an integral part of the site." According to the man, "I wouldn't be able to meet girls as young and as beautiful as this through an ordinary dating site." Sugar daddies such as him believe that the consensual relationships are appropriate for students seeking to supplement their bank accounts without having to spend "eight hours slogging in a bar only earning minimum wage." The general consensus between both parties is that expectations go both ways and that sugar daddies "provide money to individuals who decide they want a certain type of relationship." Whether it be a means to cure loneliness, or for those who simply don't have the time for a committed relationship, several women have agreed that they "always end up getting what they want financially, and that's the whole point. You've got to play the system."

Although Scholarships.com neither condones nor condemns the aforementioned practice, we believe that paying for college doesn't have to be daunting, and that the best way to fund your college education is through scholarships. Check out how many you qualify for today, and start earning free money for college.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Christina Zhou

When it comes to college applications, most students worry more about whether or not their grades are high enough, whether their essays are well-written, or if they have enough extracurricular activities. Recommendation letters are often lower on the list of priorities and are often hastily asked for close to the deadline. However, recommendation letters are often one of the most common ways to distinguish between quality applications. Below are several ways to avoid getting tepid recommendation letters that make your otherwise quality application look lackluster.

  • Ask early. Teachers are often very busy, and quality recommendation letters take time and effort to write. Asking them right before the deadline is both inconvenient and inconsiderate. They may flat out turn down your request, and if you don't have backup options, you may miss out on applying for certain schools. Even if they do, they will most likely not do as good a job as they could have done if you had asked sooner.
  • Teach them about you. If they agree to write a recommendation letter, you should provide them with a copy of your resume. If you don't have a resume, a short summary of yourself will do. You might also want to refresh their memory of your performance in class.
  • Choose wisely. Ask a teacher that you had for a class fairly recently - junior year is probably best. The exception to this is if you have a teacher that you have had for multiple classes and/or have built up a very good relationship with. For example, you can ask your band teacher for a recommendation if you have been in band for many years and performed well. If you are applying with a specific major in mind, or if you are applying to a major-specific program, it would be a good idea to try and get a recommendation from a teacher that teaches that subject.
  • Ask in person. This is so important! You can email to meet with them to talk about it, but the actual request should be done in person. Recommendation letters are time-consuming to write, and also require a level of connection. Too many recommendation letters sound like fill-in-the-blank forms.
  • Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

Earlier this week, 18 year old NAU student Francisco Curiel was charged for selling and possessing illegal drugs and paraphernalia. Why was he selling? Allegedly, to pay for books. Although on a full ride to Northern Arizona University, Curiel supposedly had an outstanding balance of $600 to pay for books and materials. After a room search, police found two bags of powder and plastic tubes with cocaine residue. He and his roommate, Damian Hernandez, were both arrested with charges of possession and sale of narcotics and paraphernalia.

Last year Census data revealed that 72 percent of undergraduate college students worked a job while in school to pay for costs that financial aid does not cover. Though typical jobs include working at a coffee shop, waiting tables or retail, some students are opting to take the non-traditional route by selling drugs since the drastic change in opinion of the legalization of marijuana. According to Pew Research Center, support for marijuana legalization is rapidly outpacing opposition with a majority (53%) of Americans in support of legalization. Growing support is evidenced by four states who have already legalized marijuana, including: Oregon, Washington, Colorado and Alaska. Furthermore, there is a handful of other states looking to pursue similar suit, such as: Massachusetts, California, Missouri, Hawaii, Maine, Nevada and Ohio. These statistics however, give no insight as to people's opinions on the selling of heavier drugs, such as cocaine.

While there are monetary benefits to selling drugs such as reducing or eliminating college debt, student dealers admit there are severe consequences if caught selling. One anonymous student at Boise State claimed, "If I get thrown in jail, my bail is going to be more than what I make." An undercover detective with the Boise Police Department stresses the importance in avoiding such involvement, as it could cost a year sentence in prison or felony charge. Felony charges drastically affect future career opportunities and felons risk unemployment. Often the "middle man" is charged with the same sentence as the seller. The detective urges students to continue applying for scholarships and constantly talking to college financial aid offices for more monetary assistance.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

Should college and university campuses create private prayer spaces to better accommodate Muslim students? Such is the dilemma for Wichita State, where Muslim students must pray in the library or walk to the nearest mosque and risk being late for class. Public universities routinely face this challenge and are unsure how to respond - they must simultaneously balance the needs of Muslim students while abiding the First Amendment, which prohibits the promotion of religion. One proposed solution is to clear out the pews from the campus chapel to make for a flexible space.

In contrast to public colleges, private institutions do not face the same legal issues. For example, Georgetown University has 50-60 students gathering daily in an on-campus Muslim prayer room. Even the University of Colorado at Boulder is seeking to create a quiet zone that's religion-neutral because "prayer would be one of the many functions that would go into the room." The Muslim Student Association (MSA) has created a guideline called "How to Establish a Prayer Room on Campus," and MSA President Mubarak has stated that “the issue of prayer for Muslim students is a little bit unique in that Muslims have to pray at set times of the day...it's very likely that they will need to pray at some point when they are on campus." The MSA believes a prayer room should be centrally located, easily accessible and clean place and possibly have bookshelves, shoe racks, and bulletin boards.

A large portion of the students on Wichita State's campus are OK with the concept of having an interfaith prayer space, but there are always those who question, "Why would WSU change the chapel into a mosque?" In your opinion, how should WSU and other universities address the prayer room issue? If you are spiritually strong in your faith, check out some of our specific religion scholarships to help fund your college education.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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College Culture

by Erica Lewis

For people who are highly-organized, you want a way to keep track of everything you have to get done. It's one thing to write it down, but students often lose the list or forget about it entirely. So how can you keep organized, get all your homework done, and still have leisure time? Since we tend to have quick and easy access to mobile devices, check out some of these organizational mobile apps.

  • Evernote. This app allows you to sync everything between your phone and computer for the best accessibility: anywhere, anytime. From notes to task lists, Evernote keeps you focused on moving ideas from inspiration to completion. Best used for note-taking, you can also clip web images, capture handwritten notes and snap photos to keep the physical and digital details of your projects with you at all times.
  • MyHomework. Do you forget your school agenda? Do you have a hard time reading your planner? Looking for a replacement to the paper planner or academic agenda? MyHomework is the solution. It allows you to program all important deadlines and tasks. The modern design and simple interface makes great for easy navigation. You can upload pictures and files to your homework and classes as well as use a class schedule widget for today's classes.
  • Finish. Named the "to-do list for procrastinators," the app reminds students of assignments to be completed. Give track of your completed assignments through the automatic archive tool. Finish also gives rewards for completing tasks on time. The most unique feature is its automated timeframes system - all you have to do is add your task by specifying a name and due date and Finish does the rest. Finally, Finish sorts timeframes as time elapses - set your priorities to either "short term" or "mid term" to let Finish notify you of due dates.
  • Pocket Points. This app is not necessarily for organization, but Pocket Points gives you rewards simply for not using your phone in class. Why not get rewarded for following the rules? The more points you get, the better rewards you can earn. Simply open the app, lock your phone, and start gaining points. Points can be used for great discounts at local and online businesses, such as food and clothing!
  • The best part of all these apps? They are FREE, just like Scholarships.com. Scheduling doesn't have to be difficult, and neither does paying for school. Make sure to keep checking scholarships.com for new opportunities!

    And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

With the help of the federal government, seventy-two women's and civil-rights groups are launching a campaign to pressure colleges into protecting students from anonymous, threatening social-media posts. Users are able to post anonymously on apps such as Yik Yak - dialogues that aren't necessarily classroom-appropriate. Discussions sometimes contain racist, sexist and other derogatory content which has led to college arrests due to campus threats. According to the groups' letter to the Office for Civil Rights, colleges fail to monitor the anonymous posts or pursue harassers due to colleges' "vague First Amendment concerns." Whose voice is more important in this situation?

Social-networking platforms that attract online harassment such as Yik Yak, 4chan, and BurnBook have safeguards that can be easily maneuvered by slightly changing works like "rape" to "grape." Community monitoring allows students to "down-vote" such comments for removal but does not prevent the initial posting. Some posts go beyond sexual harassment and threaten students with rape and murder, as seen at the University of Mary Washington. The Office of Civil Rights launched an investigation due to alleged Title IX violations. Colleges tend to avoid responsibility for online harassment on social media platforms mostly because students do not need university servers for access.

Yik Yak's popularity is evidenced by their $60 million in investments and is one of the most profitable social-media applications that allows anonymous discussions. While some organizations such as the Feminists United and the Feminist Majority Foundation are pushing for Yik Yak's ban, Dr. Junco at Harvard University studied the app and would "hate to see colleges prevent students' use of the application, because many of the statements made on it… are positive or affirming."

In your opinion, should Yik Yak and other similar apps be banned or not? Share your thoughtful opinions with us in the comment box below.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

What happens when your high school 100-meter breast stroke time is almost as fast as the women's all-time best at Harvard, the school you've been eying for as long as you could remember - but you determine you can no longer repress the feeling that you are a man trapped inside a woman's body? Such was the case for swimmer Schuyler Bailer, who underwent partial surgery, now identifies as a man and will compete on the Harvard men's swim team. The NCAA allowed Bailer to choose what team to swim for and Harvard’s women's swim coach supports Bailer's decision even if it means losing a top recruit.

Bailer took a year off following high school graduation and made the decision to identify as a man after having repressed these feelings from a very young age. Bailer claimed, "I had worked my whole life to be on that team," and that the coming-out-of-the-closet experience was stressful enough. Bailer is realistic about future stresses, such as competing with a new gender, locker room etiquette and media scrutiny. However, transgender athletes have been around since 1977, when Renée Richard joined the women's tennis professional tour after the New York Supreme Court had intervened. Another recent, well-known case is that of Olympic decathlete Bruce Jenner, who transitioned to Caitlyn Jenner. Is the male to female transition the same as female to male transition, when it comes to athletics?

Various organizations at the junior, high school and collegiate level have begun implementing rules that allow transgender students to participate on the basis of their expressed gender identities. Even at the highest level of sport competition, the Olympics, athletes are able to participate only if they have had their gender-reassignment surgery and at least two years of hormone therapy. In the NCAA, men transitioning to women who have not undergone sex-reassignment surgery must take testosterone suppressants for one year before they can compete on the women's team. (This means Bailer would be allowed to continue on the women's team if he has not yet starting taking testosterone). Though Bailer's transition has been welcomed and supported by the NCAA and his team, he may still face discrimination and scrutiny.

In your opinion, should transgender individuals be allowed to compete with and against their biological gender group? Leave us your thoughts below in the comment box and be sure to check out our large list of sports scholarships.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

To date, roughly 70 percent of college students graduate with approximately $30,000 in college debt. What accounts for the increase in college tuition and debt burden? A short by Brave New Films titled The Big Came: College Football Stealing Your Education claims that college athletics, particularly football, may just be the problem. Since 2000, state universities across the nation have increased their tuition by 30 percent. Schools with strong football programs have increased tuition by as much as 65 percent. Studies reveal a correlation between student fees that feed directly into athletic programs and force tuition hikes. Ohio University for example, has athletic fees that run $48 a credit hour. That is about $6,000 of financial aid and scholarships that goes into paying for schools' athletic programs.

How does this affect school budgets? Many universities have taken to cutting faculty and degree programs, such as the University of Akron, which cut 215 jobs and $40 million dollars from their budget and yet, tuition did not go down. Head Football Coach Terry Bowden was signed to a $2 million contract, which comes out to $400,000 a year. When compared to the average adjunct professor salary of $25,000, it is important to consider the allocation of money within higher education. According to the Huff Post, most state coaches are the highest paid public employees.

Supporters of collegiate athletic programs argue that there's immense profit, but this is debatable as it's been found that Division I athletic programs lose $11 million a year on an operating basis and much more when capital and indirect costs are included. Athletic programs may not be as self-supporting if "the vast majority require a subsidy from the institution" to survive. Students will pay separate fees and higher tuition to cushion the deficit - these fees will not help fix classrooms or hire faculty. Alumni who donate to schools are typically donors to athletic programs rather than student or academic scholarships. It may make sense that the revenue generated from winning teams would feed directly into the athletic program and yet, those same programs remain in deficit.

In your opinion, do you think collegiate athletic programs are distorting expenditures and neglecting other important areas in higher education? Leave us your opinion in the comment section below. If you are an dedicated, passionate and talented athlete, check out some of our sports scholarships.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

Research indicates that the average college student spent $1,225 on books in the 2014-2015 academic year. In lieu of the one of the most overlooked costs of going to college and barriers to attending college, U.S. Senators Dick Durbin, Al Franken and Angus King introduced legislation to help make college textbooks more affordable. The College Textbook Affordability Act would take high quality textbooks and make them easily accessible and free to students, professors and the public. Buying books for college is inevitable - but is there a way to make it less pocket-draining?

Textbook costs have skyrocketed since 1977 by a daunting 1,041 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. What most people don't know is that publishing companies have enormous textbook charges for the smallest changes in content and unwanted bundled material. Add those insignificant changes plus high prices and you have students investing in materials that are seldom touched. Do students really have a way around these expensive materials? Perhaps you have tried to scan "on reserve" textbooks in your library or share with your classmates. Some versions of the textbook may be located online for free, but will typically only offer a preview. At the end of the day, it is almost impossible to pass courses without purchasing the materials. Durbin is seeking to also provide open education resources (OERs) to grant students better accessibility to materials, whether it be online or downloading to a digital device.

The upsides to this change are obvious: cheaper textbooks, greater accessibility and more college affordability. But can this lead to the death of textbooks? What happens to traditional pedagogy and educational practice? With the new wave of educational technology, the ways in which students acquire information, how students are tested and how teachers fit into the picture may be affected. Artificial intelligence now has students entranced in screens, which is believed to cause detrimental physical and cognitive development. Lowering the cost of textbooks is one thing - switching platform is another thing. Nancie Atwell best summarizes this point: "Technology is a means; it's not an end. And it's become an end within this country."

Do you support the transition to eBooks, open textbooks and the like, or do you support traditional textbooks? What do you think is the best method in resolving the issue of overpriced textbooks? There are schools that will pay full tuition and fees, if you qualify for the scholarship.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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