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by Susan Dutca

When it comes to well-known companies, names such as Google or Coca-Cola are not foreign to many ears. Did you know that in addition to being notorious for quality products and services, familiarity and strong reputation, these organizations also provide scholarship opportunities to help you pay your way through college? Take the opportunity to explore the scholarships offered by the companies you're most familiar with:

Dr Pepper Tuition Giveaway

Deadline: October 19, 2015
Available to: Ages 18-24
Maximum Award: $100,000

For years, this one of a kind program has awarded millions of dollars in tuition to students across the country. Dr Pepper understands that school is a full-time commitment and rising costs of education often stand in the way. For students ages 18-25, you can submit your one of a kind goal and state how you plan to make an impact on the world. Additionally, you'll be eligible to submit a video once you have shared your story and reached 50 votes.

Finalists will have a chance to compete to win up to $100,000 in tuition at a college football championship game. If you are in the top 5 of the $5,000 Leaderboard at the end of the voting period, you could win $5,000 in tuition. Those over 25 years of age are not eligible to compete in the $100,000 contest but may compete for the leaderboard prize.

For more information and to apply, please visit Dr Pepper Tuition Giveaway

Burger King James W. McLamore WHOPPER Scholarship

Deadline: December 15, 2015
Available to: High school seniors through College freshman
Maximum Award: $50,000

The McLamore Family Foundation created the James W. McLamore WHOPPER Scholarship Award, granting a $50,000 scholarship to three students each year. U.S. or Canadian students must have a cumulative unweighted GPA of at least 3.3 and a minimum ACT score of 25 or combined SAT score of 1700.

You must be able to demonstrate an active leadership role in community service, athletics, and/or similar co-curricular activity and substantial work experience.

For more information and to apply, please visit Burger King James W. McLamore WHOPPER Scholarship

Ronald McDonald House Charites (RMHC) Scholars Award

Deadline: January 20, 2016
Available to: Graduating high school seniors
Maximum Award: $1,000

Provided by Ronald McDonald House Charities, graduating high school seniors who are planning to enroll full-time at a two- or four-year college or university are eligible to apply.

Applicants must live in a participating RMHC Chapter's geographic area and maintain a minimum 2.7 GPA.

For more information and to apply, please visit Ronald McDonald House Charites (RMHC) Scholars Award

Toshiba/NSTA ExploraVision Science Competition

Deadline: February 1, 2016
Available to: Ages 5-21
Maximum Award: Up to $10,000

Sponsored by Toshiba/NSTA, the ExploraVision Science Competition is available for K-12 students to engage the next generation in real world problem solving with a strong emphasis on STEM. Students must be no older than 21 years of age and be enrolled in public, private, or home school in the U.S. or Canada.

Students enter as a team of 2-4 students with a teacher/coach and optional mentor who will guide students as they pick a current technology, research it, envision what it might look like in 20 years, and describe the development steps, pros & cons, and obstacles.

For more information and to apply, please visit Toshiba/NSTA ExploraVision Science Competition

Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation

Deadline: October 31, 2015
Available to: Graduating high school seniors
Maximum Award: $20,000

The Coca-Cola Scholars Program is an achievement-based scholarship awarded to graduating high school seniors each year. Students are recognized for their capacity to lead and serve, and their commitment to making a significant impact on their schools and communities.

Applicants must be current high school or home-schooled seniors attending school in the U.S. and planning to enroll full-time at an accredited U.S. post-secondary institution. Students must carry a minimum 3.0 GPA at the end of their junior year of high school.

For more information and to apply, please visit Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation

Horatio Alger Association Scholarship Program

Deadline: April 1, 2016
Available to: High school seniors through College Sophomores
Maximum Award: Varies

As one of the nation's largest need-based college scholarship programs in the country, the Horatio Alger Scholarship Programs specifically assist high school students who have faced and overcome great obstacles in their young lives. While many programs are directed primarily to recognizing academic achievement or leadership potential, the Horatio Alger program seeks students who have exhibited determination, integrity, and perseverance in overcoming adversity, as well as critical financial need.

There are four main categories which has its own set of requirements and criteria, so make sure to check the official rules and eligibility before apply. Those categories are: National, State, Targeted, and Vocational Scholarships.

For more information and to apply, please visit Horatio Alger Association Scholarship Program

Penguin Publishing Group's Signet Classics Student Scholarship Essay Contest

Deadline: April 14, 2016
Available to: Ages 16-18
Maximum Award: $1,000

Sponsored by Penguin Publishing Group, the Annual Signet Classic Scholarship Essay Contest is open to high school juniors and seniors. Applicants are required to write an essay on one of five selected topics listed on the main website. This year's essay competition is based on the book, "Little Women." Essay topics are posted at the provider's main website.

For more information and to apply, please visit Penguin Publishing Group's Signet Classics Student Scholarship Essay Contest

Wells Fargo CollegeSTEPS Sweepstakes

Deadline: June 30, 2016
Available to: High School Freshman through Graduate Student
Maximum Award: $1,000

Whether you're on your way to college or already there, there are two big things you probably need: money and information. With Wells Fargo, you have a chance to get both.

If you're a high school or college student and you sign up to receive college planning and money management information from Wells Fargo, you'll be automatically entered in the CollegeSTEPS sweepstakes for a chance to win $5,000.

For more information and to apply, please visit Wells Fargo CollegeSTEPS Sweepstakes

Google Lime Scholarship for Students with Disabilities

Deadline: December 6, 2015
Available to: College Undergraduates through Graduate Students
Maximum Award: $10,000

Google is committed to helping the innovators of the future make the most of their talents by providing scholarships and networking retreats for computer science students with disabilities. Recipients will each receive a scholarship as well as be invited to attend the annual Google Scholars' Retreat at the Googleplex in Mountain View, California.

Undergraduates, graduates, or PhD students currently enrolled at a university in the U.S. or Canada are eligible to apply. Students should be pursuing a computer science or computer engineering degree or in a closely related technical field.

Students must have a visible or invisible disability, exemplify leadership, and demonstrate passion for computer science and technology.

For more information and to apply, please visit Google Lime Scholarship for Students with Disabilities

Dell Scholars Program

Deadline: January 15, 2016
Available to: High school seniors
Maximum Award:$20,000 plus a laptop and textbook credits

The Dell Scholars Program enables more under-served students with financial need to achieve their greatest potential through higher education. Dell Scholars are students who demonstrate their desire and ability to overcome barriers and to achieve their goals.

Students must be graduating from an accredited high school the year in which the scholarship is awarded while maintaining a 2.4 GPA. Students must participate in a MSDF approved college readiness program for a minimum of two years and plan to enter a bachelor’s degree program in the fall directly after graduation from high school. Applicants must demonstrate financial need and be eligible to receive a federal Pell Grant in their first year of college.

In addition to the $20,000 scholarship, Dell will supply scholarship recipients with a laptop and textbook credits.

For more information and to apply, please visit Dell Scholars Program

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Cracking the New SAT

Oct 12, 2015

by Christina Zhou

If you've been studying for the old SAT, you only have a short amount of time left to take it. This standardized test is undergoing a redesigning process, a fact that leaves many high school students even more stressed about the test than before, especially juniors and seniors girding themselves for college applications. All the prep books from past years are obsolete! However, given what we currently know about the future format of the SAT, there are several ways to get ahead of the game and do well despite the unfamiliar format.
  • If you don't know, guess. Although the old SAT format penalized guessing by a deduction of a quarter of a point per wrong answer, the new SAT has no such penalty. Therefore, it is in your best interest to provide an answer for each question, especially if you're running out of time. Leaving questions blank is now the worst decision. Additionally, the number of possible choices per question is being reduced. So now if you guess wildly, you will have a greater chance of being right than before.
  • Forget vocab lists. No longer will you have to frantically memorize huge lists of practically obsolete vocabulary words in order to do well on the reading section of the SAT. The new SAT will have terminology more likely to be seen in the real world.
  • Other subjects matter. The new SAT will include either an excerpt from one of America's founding documents or issues discussing freedom, injustice and the like. Therefore, it would be in your best interest to become familiarized with some of the more well-known documents to save time during the test. Additionally, skills like graph reading and analysis, usually seen more in science subjects, will be featured in the new format.
  • Don't stress it. An increasingly high number of colleges are eschewing standardized tests as part of the admission process, turning it into a voluntary option. If you don’t do well the first time, study hard and try again, but don’t be discouraged.
  • And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

This past Saturday at 9 a.m., players arrived at the University of Cincinnati's basketball arena for a two-day tournament hosted by the UC's League of...Legends? Yes: The university now considers League of Legends an official club sport, just like soccer or rugby. With 14,000 people watching the tournament online, the event became one of the largest collegiate e-sports events with participants competing for a $2,000 cash prize. But is it a game or is it a sport?

Though skeptical at first, UC's administration finally caved and are now seeing the benefits of the League. There has been increased visibility for video gamers across campuses, especially now that it's organized and holds educational value. Gaming competitions are legitimized through rules and regulations, though not yet under the rule of the NCAA. Furthermore, the U.S. government allows professional video gamers to use "athlete visas" to travel internationally to compete. With this trend, one may argue that video games aren't necessarily becoming more popular but rather it's a "formalization and institutionalization of what's always been present."

Robert Morris University in Chicago became the first U.S. college to make competitive gaming a varsity sport and offer video game scholarships up to half of tuition and housing, roughly $19,000. Video game sponsors helped RMU create the ideal gaming room with high-tech monitors, headsets and chairs so that students resemble fighter pilots. Though they fell short to the University of British Columbia in the 2015 North American Collegiate Championship, RMU competitors still received $15,000 in scholarships while UBC took home the $30,000 championship trophy.

What do you think about getting paid to game? If you are an avid gamer and want to be rewarded for your talent and passion, check out some video game and design scholarships to celebrate International Games Day on November 21st.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

Last week, a Mount Holyoke College professor allegedly went around his class trying to guess what racial slurs minority students might have been called in their lifetime. Students claimed the exercise was a form of racial discrimination. In this day and age, we are more politically correct than ever before. College students now think twice before raising their hands to offer an opinion on sensitive or controversial topics. Similarly, professors have become more reluctant to analyze and dissect material that may trigger negative emotional responses. We fear that what we may say will offend someone else, even if we had not intended to do so. There has been a large "institutionalization of microagression" - small actions or word choices that are not intended to be malicious but are considered violent nonetheless. Where there once was the freedom of academic speech and healthy debating of opposing ideas, there is now a constant defense of students' emotions. This coddling, which infantilizes and diminishes intellectual discussion now exists to prevent countless lawsuits and could be considered an overprotection of "adult" students' psyches. For students looking to take on adulthood in college, should that require thicker skin and learning to listen to, and accept other people's opinions?

Best discussed in The Atlantic, there has been a drastic climate change in America's higher education where we have elevated the "goals of protecting students from psychological harm." This new "vindictive protectiveness" is believed to have emerged during the 1980s, in order to protect women and minority individuals from offensive speech. There is now a strong censorship of speech and of intellectual thinking for students and professors. Cautious to not offend anyone or for fear that students may cry victim at the slightest opposition to their opinion, institutions have implemented trigger warnings - alerts that professors issue if they sense strong emotional discomfort from students. Professor Hill, English professor at Mount Holyoke had asked his students to give examples of modern day racial slurs – within the context of analyzing Robinson Crusoe and the book's use of the term "papist". Going around the classroom, Professor Hill had pointed out specific minorities and guessed what racial slurs may have been used to describe. Students took offense to this exercise and later detailed the insensible and discriminatory nature of the lesson.

President Obama has taken to the issue of coddled college students, microaggression, and culture of victimhood and stated, "I don't agree you have to be coddled and protected from different points of view. Anybody who comes to speak to you and you disagree with, you should have an argument with them, but you shouldn't silence them by saying you can't come because I'm too sensitive to hear what you have to say." How, if at all, can we find a balance between free academic speech and protecting students' emotions?

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Erica Lewis

Oh, yes, group projects. When it comes to group projects, you either love 'em or hate 'em. There's really no in-between. So how do you keep your cool when you can't stand your partners or the project itself?

  • Divide the work evenly. Don't let one person do all the work and then have the other names attached to the project. Although the load may be carried more heavily by one person, it's important to make sure that everyone plays an important role and is kept up to date. This is crucial if you're doing a group presentation and not simply submitting the project.
  • Make use of in-class work time. Many professors will give groups time in class to work on their projects. There may not be enough time to accomplish everything during this period, but it can help everyone figure out their individual tasks so you don’t have to do more work than necessary. It's also a great time to ask questions if you are unsure about any instructions or requirements.
  • Set deadlines even if they aren't assigned. The project isn't due until the end of the semester, so you can put it off, right? Wrong. However tempting it may be to procrastinate, it is better to set deadlines for your group even if the professor hasn’t assigned them. Schedule a meeting with all the group members and hold everyone accountable for their job. It just makes things easier in the long run.
  • Group projects don't have to be a daunting task, and neither does paying for school. Make sure to keep checking out your scholarship opportunities.

    Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

In less than a month the world of higher education has moved forward with changes to the traditional approaches in the college application and admission process - first, with the simplified and updated FAFSA to appear in October 2016 and now, with 80 colleges and universities building a platform to streamline the application process that they hope to debut in summer of 2016. The goal is to get rid of the old "formulaic approach" and to strengthen the communication system between students and colleges, especially for those who lack adequate and sufficient college-going resources.

October and November are notorious for being high-stress months for high school seniors race as they race to meet early application deadlines. Students and families from more affluent backgrounds often have better-equipped and resourceful educators in contrast to their disadvantaged, low-income counterparts. To remove any barriers that would prevent students from applying to college, the "coalition" group, called the Coalition for Access, Affordability and Success, first announced its plan for a more retro application last fall, which would house smaller membership and different requirements. Among the 83 colleges and universities that have started creating the joint application portal, 52 are private schools and 31 are public schools; several Ivy League schools as well as other elite and highly selective liberal arts institutions are represented. In order to participate, colleges must demonstrate at least 70% of students graduate within six years and private colleges must vow to meet the financial need of all U.S. students. Similarly, public institutions must have affordable in-state tuition and strong financial aid.

The new application would serve as an alternative to the Common Application, and schools may choose to keep the former version, according to the Los Angeles Times. The new application would allow students to create a portfolio by storing their schoolwork while also receiving advice and information on colleges and financial aid. With this new format, the coalition hopes to "motivate a strong college-going mindset among students of all backgrounds, especially those from low-income families or underrepresented groups who have historically had less access to leading colleges and universities."

Do you think this initiative would appeal to more and students and simplify the application process? College and financial aid applications can be tedious, as well as applying for financial aid which is why we are here to assist you as you apply for college.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (16)

by Christina Zhou

One of the things necessary for success in college is being a well-rounded person. No matter what career field you choose to enter, reading and writing is essential. Therefore, every college student should strive to read a wide variety of literature. Below are several popular and timeless books that every college student should read:

  • Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë. A classic coming of age story, many college students will identify with the young protagonist's struggles to figure out what she wants to do in life as well as learn that one should never abandon their principles, no matter the temptation.
  • The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot. Considered as one of the most important literary works of the 20th century, it has a multitude of confusing references and footnotes that are designed to obscure rather than illuminate meaning. The Waste Land shows both the tragedy and the hope of modern life.
  • The Odyssey by Homer. This classic epic of Odysseus’s fantastical and dangerous journey home to his family after the Trojan War has fascinated audiences for centuries. Odysseus must fight mystical creatures and endure the wrath of the gods while retaking the throne of Ithaca.
  • Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare. Although Shakespeare is well known for his tragedies like Hamlet and Romeo and Juliet, his comedic play Much Ado About Nothing is full of examples of clever word play as the two main characters throw verbal darts at each other. Even the title is a triple play on words!
  • The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. This hilarious and random galactic adventure involving several eccentric characters will find its way to your bookshelf and heart. A science fiction classic, it is the first of a series that reveal Adams' imaginative depiction of the future.
  • And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

If you've ever had to fill out a FAFSA for college, you may have felt as though you need an accounting degree to understand it, much less complete it. With over 130 questions and averaging 30 minutes to complete, the complexity and tedium of filing for financial aid has been a barrier for students in attending college or receiving the financial aid for which they qualify. The Department of Education announced an initiative Monday to simplify the process and beginning in October 2016, students and their families will be able to complete a simpler FAFSA application.

Currently, students must wait until after most college application deadlines to apply for federal aid - the new FAFSA amendments will enable application as early as October 1 and better align students with college deadlines. The current January 1 application opens after many college application periods have closed and students may not know their entire financial aid package before committing to a college. With the new amendments, students will have a better understanding of the actual cost of their college education. Federal Student Aid awards $150 billion in grants, loans and other types of financial assistance annually. Sadly, about 2 million students enrolled in college who would qualify for a Federal Pell Grant never applied for aid. With the new initiative, the plan to improve the process of applying for federal aid will include:

  • Earlier application - Information for the FAFSA will be readily available around the same time high school students are searching for, and applying to college, meaning less pressure and stress. The current FAFSA application opens January 1 and cannot be completed until after April 15, when tax forms are due.
  • Simpler application - A new data retrieval tool will allow applicants to electronically access tax information directly from the IRS, after filing their 2015 tax returns. This means less income estimates and errors and more accuracy.
  • More students assisted - It is estimated that hundreds of thousands of students, especially first-generation and minority students, will apply for and enroll in college as a result of a simpler FAFSA. In 2013, roughly $45 million was left on the table in Pell Grants due to the complexity of the application.
  • More colleges assisted - As many as 3 million hours are spent annually by colleges and universities verifying FAFSA Information. With the new data retrieval tool from the IRS, colleges and universities will have less trouble verifying tax return information.
  • Do you think the new amendments to the current FAFSA will benefit students as they apply for financial aid earlier and with a simpler application? If you are interested in learning more about FAFSA, federal aid, grants and scholarships, read some of our tips on funding your college education.

    Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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    by Susan Dutca

    All was quiet on DePauw University's campus in Greencastle, Indiana on Wednesday until a group of Bible-carrying protesters arrived, shouting that students who engaged in "unholy behaviors," including homosexuality, excessive sexuality, drug and alcohol use, and masturbating, were going to hell. The group of confrontational evangelists, also known as "Bro. Jed's School of Evangelism" Campus Ministry USA, are allegedly known for organizing campus protests and are not affiliated with a particular church. Students ignored the protest at first but soon hundreds of students gathered, bringing gay pride flags and chanting "we have nothing to lose but our chains."

    Protestors spewed slurs to students and passersby, calling men "evil" and women promiscuous as well as asking students how many STDs they had. DePauw University's president and student government representatives appeared as well to support students. President Brian Casey organized a campus gathering in Ubben Quad that same day to have students "show solidarity and support for one another." In his mass email, he acknowledged the First Amendment which "guarantees the right to free speech on public grounds - even for messages filled with hate and animosity." Initially, students had tried ignoring the protestors by not giving them a reaction; the demonstration intensified with speakers, music and a growing crowd. Only two students were detained, including one who threw coffee at the protestors and no one was arrested. Protestors were escorted off campus around 1:50 pm and the crowd slowly trickled away. The protests are suspected to have been held in opposition to Bi Visibility Day, observed September 23rd.

    Do you think the First Amendment protects the group's demonstration? Was the protest handled appropriately? Leave us your thoughts in the comment section. And if you're passionate about protecting people's rights, check out some of our law scholarships.

    And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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    by Christina Zhou

    Although schools are becoming increasingly diverse with its food options, the situation is still fairly grim for those who have special dietary considerations. Foods with strong dietary specifications, such as vegetarianism or religious dietary products, can be difficult to come by and usually do not have many options. However, this deficit can be resolved with the following tips:

    • Stock up on stock. For many, buying the raw ingredients for the foods that they want to eat is unfeasible both practically and financially. However, soups are both easy to prepare and cheap to buy. Additionally, they keep fresh for a long time and can be bought in bulk.
    • Join a group. Nowadays, you can find almost any sort of club you want on a college campus. Try finding a group out there that fits your needs. These sorts of clubs often have get-togethers with opportunities for free food. This way, you have easy access to the foods you need and can bond with other students.
    • Bring snacks. Look into nearby stores and see if you can find options there. Simple things like dried fruit and granola bars are usually cheap and keep fresh for a long time. If you live close enough, you can also try to bring some food supplies from home.
    • Seek out advice resources. There are many nutrition and food services available for students, including dining services and student health. Ask about feasible options nearby as well as nutritional information. Additionally, take advantage of the most underused resource: current students. Talk to them and find out what they do to get around these dining problems. This goes for many other situations as well. The upperclassmen have gone through the same college struggles as you, and are usually more than happy to give advice.
    • And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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