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by Erica Lewis

For people who are highly-organized, you want a way to keep track of everything you have to get done. It's one thing to write it down, but students often lose the list or forget about it entirely. So how can you keep organized, get all your homework done, and still have leisure time? Since we tend to have quick and easy access to mobile devices, check out some of these organizational mobile apps.

  • Evernote. This app allows you to sync everything between your phone and computer for the best accessibility: anywhere, anytime. From notes to task lists, Evernote keeps you focused on moving ideas from inspiration to completion. Best used for note-taking, you can also clip web images, capture handwritten notes and snap photos to keep the physical and digital details of your projects with you at all times.
  • MyHomework. Do you forget your school agenda? Do you have a hard time reading your planner? Looking for a replacement to the paper planner or academic agenda? MyHomework is the solution. It allows you to program all important deadlines and tasks. The modern design and simple interface makes great for easy navigation. You can upload pictures and files to your homework and classes as well as use a class schedule widget for today's classes.
  • Finish. Named the "to-do list for procrastinators," the app reminds students of assignments to be completed. Give track of your completed assignments through the automatic archive tool. Finish also gives rewards for completing tasks on time. The most unique feature is its automated timeframes system - all you have to do is add your task by specifying a name and due date and Finish does the rest. Finally, Finish sorts timeframes as time elapses - set your priorities to either "short term" or "mid term" to let Finish notify you of due dates.
  • Pocket Points. This app is not necessarily for organization, but Pocket Points gives you rewards simply for not using your phone in class. Why not get rewarded for following the rules? The more points you get, the better rewards you can earn. Simply open the app, lock your phone, and start gaining points. Points can be used for great discounts at local and online businesses, such as food and clothing!
  • The best part of all these apps? They are FREE, just like Scholarships.com. Scheduling doesn't have to be difficult, and neither does paying for school. Make sure to keep checking scholarships.com for new opportunities!

    And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

With the help of the federal government, seventy-two women's and civil-rights groups are launching a campaign to pressure colleges into protecting students from anonymous, threatening social-media posts. Users are able to post anonymously on apps such as Yik Yak - dialogues that aren't necessarily classroom-appropriate. Discussions sometimes contain racist, sexist and other derogatory content which has led to college arrests due to campus threats. According to the groups' letter to the Office for Civil Rights, colleges fail to monitor the anonymous posts or pursue harassers due to colleges' "vague First Amendment concerns." Whose voice is more important in this situation?

Social-networking platforms that attract online harassment such as Yik Yak, 4chan, and BurnBook have safeguards that can be easily maneuvered by slightly changing works like "rape" to "grape." Community monitoring allows students to "down-vote" such comments for removal but does not prevent the initial posting. Some posts go beyond sexual harassment and threaten students with rape and murder, as seen at the University of Mary Washington. The Office of Civil Rights launched an investigation due to alleged Title IX violations. Colleges tend to avoid responsibility for online harassment on social media platforms mostly because students do not need university servers for access.

Yik Yak's popularity is evidenced by their $60 million in investments and is one of the most profitable social-media applications that allows anonymous discussions. While some organizations such as the Feminists United and the Feminist Majority Foundation are pushing for Yik Yak's ban, Dr. Junco at Harvard University studied the app and would "hate to see colleges prevent students' use of the application, because many of the statements made on it… are positive or affirming."

In your opinion, should Yik Yak and other similar apps be banned or not? Share your thoughtful opinions with us in the comment box below.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

What happens when your high school 100-meter breast stroke time is almost as fast as the women's all-time best at Harvard, the school you've been eying for as long as you could remember - but you determine you can no longer repress the feeling that you are a man trapped inside a woman's body? Such was the case for swimmer Schuyler Bailer, who underwent partial surgery, now identifies as a man and will compete on the Harvard men's swim team. The NCAA allowed Bailer to choose what team to swim for and Harvard’s women's swim coach supports Bailer's decision even if it means losing a top recruit.

Bailer took a year off following high school graduation and made the decision to identify as a man after having repressed these feelings from a very young age. Bailer claimed, "I had worked my whole life to be on that team," and that the coming-out-of-the-closet experience was stressful enough. Bailer is realistic about future stresses, such as competing with a new gender, locker room etiquette and media scrutiny. However, transgender athletes have been around since 1977, when Renée Richard joined the women's tennis professional tour after the New York Supreme Court had intervened. Another recent, well-known case is that of Olympic decathlete Bruce Jenner, who transitioned to Caitlyn Jenner. Is the male to female transition the same as female to male transition, when it comes to athletics?

Various organizations at the junior, high school and collegiate level have begun implementing rules that allow transgender students to participate on the basis of their expressed gender identities. Even at the highest level of sport competition, the Olympics, athletes are able to participate only if they have had their gender-reassignment surgery and at least two years of hormone therapy. In the NCAA, men transitioning to women who have not undergone sex-reassignment surgery must take testosterone suppressants for one year before they can compete on the women's team. (This means Bailer would be allowed to continue on the women's team if he has not yet starting taking testosterone). Though Bailer's transition has been welcomed and supported by the NCAA and his team, he may still face discrimination and scrutiny.

In your opinion, should transgender individuals be allowed to compete with and against their biological gender group? Leave us your thoughts below in the comment box and be sure to check out our large list of sports scholarships.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

To date, roughly 70 percent of college students graduate with approximately $30,000 in college debt. What accounts for the increase in college tuition and debt burden? A short by Brave New Films titled The Big Came: College Football Stealing Your Education claims that college athletics, particularly football, may just be the problem. Since 2000, state universities across the nation have increased their tuition by 30 percent. Schools with strong football programs have increased tuition by as much as 65 percent. Studies reveal a correlation between student fees that feed directly into athletic programs and force tuition hikes. Ohio University for example, has athletic fees that run $48 a credit hour. That is about $6,000 of financial aid and scholarships that goes into paying for schools' athletic programs.

How does this affect school budgets? Many universities have taken to cutting faculty and degree programs, such as the University of Akron, which cut 215 jobs and $40 million dollars from their budget and yet, tuition did not go down. Head Football Coach Terry Bowden was signed to a $2 million contract, which comes out to $400,000 a year. When compared to the average adjunct professor salary of $25,000, it is important to consider the allocation of money within higher education. According to the Huff Post, most state coaches are the highest paid public employees.

Supporters of collegiate athletic programs argue that there's immense profit, but this is debatable as it's been found that Division I athletic programs lose $11 million a year on an operating basis and much more when capital and indirect costs are included. Athletic programs may not be as self-supporting if "the vast majority require a subsidy from the institution" to survive. Students will pay separate fees and higher tuition to cushion the deficit - these fees will not help fix classrooms or hire faculty. Alumni who donate to schools are typically donors to athletic programs rather than student or academic scholarships. It may make sense that the revenue generated from winning teams would feed directly into the athletic program and yet, those same programs remain in deficit.

In your opinion, do you think collegiate athletic programs are distorting expenditures and neglecting other important areas in higher education? Leave us your opinion in the comment section below. If you are an dedicated, passionate and talented athlete, check out some of our sports scholarships.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

Research indicates that the average college student spent $1,225 on books in the 2014-2015 academic year. In lieu of the one of the most overlooked costs of going to college and barriers to attending college, U.S. Senators Dick Durbin, Al Franken and Angus King introduced legislation to help make college textbooks more affordable. The College Textbook Affordability Act would take high quality textbooks and make them easily accessible and free to students, professors and the public. Buying books for college is inevitable - but is there a way to make it less pocket-draining?

Textbook costs have skyrocketed since 1977 by a daunting 1,041 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. What most people don't know is that publishing companies have enormous textbook charges for the smallest changes in content and unwanted bundled material. Add those insignificant changes plus high prices and you have students investing in materials that are seldom touched. Do students really have a way around these expensive materials? Perhaps you have tried to scan "on reserve" textbooks in your library or share with your classmates. Some versions of the textbook may be located online for free, but will typically only offer a preview. At the end of the day, it is almost impossible to pass courses without purchasing the materials. Durbin is seeking to also provide open education resources (OERs) to grant students better accessibility to materials, whether it be online or downloading to a digital device.

The upsides to this change are obvious: cheaper textbooks, greater accessibility and more college affordability. But can this lead to the death of textbooks? What happens to traditional pedagogy and educational practice? With the new wave of educational technology, the ways in which students acquire information, how students are tested and how teachers fit into the picture may be affected. Artificial intelligence now has students entranced in screens, which is believed to cause detrimental physical and cognitive development. Lowering the cost of textbooks is one thing - switching platform is another thing. Nancie Atwell best summarizes this point: "Technology is a means; it's not an end. And it's become an end within this country."

Do you support the transition to eBooks, open textbooks and the like, or do you support traditional textbooks? What do you think is the best method in resolving the issue of overpriced textbooks? There are schools that will pay full tuition and fees, if you qualify for the scholarship.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

When it comes to well-known companies, names such as Google or Coca-Cola are not foreign to many ears. Did you know that in addition to being notorious for quality products and services, familiarity and strong reputation, these organizations also provide scholarship opportunities to help you pay your way through college? Take the opportunity to explore the scholarships offered by the companies you're most familiar with:

Dr Pepper Tuition Giveaway

Deadline: October 19, 2015
Available to: Ages 18-24
Maximum Award: $100,000

For years, this one of a kind program has awarded millions of dollars in tuition to students across the country. Dr Pepper understands that school is a full-time commitment and rising costs of education often stand in the way. For students ages 18-25, you can submit your one of a kind goal and state how you plan to make an impact on the world. Additionally, you'll be eligible to submit a video once you have shared your story and reached 50 votes.

Finalists will have a chance to compete to win up to $100,000 in tuition at a college football championship game. If you are in the top 5 of the $5,000 Leaderboard at the end of the voting period, you could win $5,000 in tuition. Those over 25 years of age are not eligible to compete in the $100,000 contest but may compete for the leaderboard prize.

For more information and to apply, please visit Dr Pepper Tuition Giveaway

Burger King James W. McLamore WHOPPER Scholarship

Deadline: December 15, 2015
Available to: High school seniors through College freshman
Maximum Award: $50,000

The McLamore Family Foundation created the James W. McLamore WHOPPER Scholarship Award, granting a $50,000 scholarship to three students each year. U.S. or Canadian students must have a cumulative unweighted GPA of at least 3.3 and a minimum ACT score of 25 or combined SAT score of 1700.

You must be able to demonstrate an active leadership role in community service, athletics, and/or similar co-curricular activity and substantial work experience.

For more information and to apply, please visit Burger King James W. McLamore WHOPPER Scholarship

Ronald McDonald House Charites (RMHC) Scholars Award

Deadline: January 20, 2016
Available to: Graduating high school seniors
Maximum Award: $1,000

Provided by Ronald McDonald House Charities, graduating high school seniors who are planning to enroll full-time at a two- or four-year college or university are eligible to apply.

Applicants must live in a participating RMHC Chapter's geographic area and maintain a minimum 2.7 GPA.

For more information and to apply, please visit Ronald McDonald House Charites (RMHC) Scholars Award

Toshiba/NSTA ExploraVision Science Competition

Deadline: February 1, 2016
Available to: Ages 5-21
Maximum Award: Up to $10,000

Sponsored by Toshiba/NSTA, the ExploraVision Science Competition is available for K-12 students to engage the next generation in real world problem solving with a strong emphasis on STEM. Students must be no older than 21 years of age and be enrolled in public, private, or home school in the U.S. or Canada.

Students enter as a team of 2-4 students with a teacher/coach and optional mentor who will guide students as they pick a current technology, research it, envision what it might look like in 20 years, and describe the development steps, pros & cons, and obstacles.

For more information and to apply, please visit Toshiba/NSTA ExploraVision Science Competition

Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation

Deadline: October 31, 2015
Available to: Graduating high school seniors
Maximum Award: $20,000

The Coca-Cola Scholars Program is an achievement-based scholarship awarded to graduating high school seniors each year. Students are recognized for their capacity to lead and serve, and their commitment to making a significant impact on their schools and communities.

Applicants must be current high school or home-schooled seniors attending school in the U.S. and planning to enroll full-time at an accredited U.S. post-secondary institution. Students must carry a minimum 3.0 GPA at the end of their junior year of high school.

For more information and to apply, please visit Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation

Horatio Alger Association Scholarship Program

Deadline: April 1, 2016
Available to: High school seniors through College Sophomores
Maximum Award: Varies

As one of the nation's largest need-based college scholarship programs in the country, the Horatio Alger Scholarship Programs specifically assist high school students who have faced and overcome great obstacles in their young lives. While many programs are directed primarily to recognizing academic achievement or leadership potential, the Horatio Alger program seeks students who have exhibited determination, integrity, and perseverance in overcoming adversity, as well as critical financial need.

There are four main categories which has its own set of requirements and criteria, so make sure to check the official rules and eligibility before apply. Those categories are: National, State, Targeted, and Vocational Scholarships.

For more information and to apply, please visit Horatio Alger Association Scholarship Program

Penguin Publishing Group's Signet Classics Student Scholarship Essay Contest

Deadline: April 14, 2016
Available to: Ages 16-18
Maximum Award: $1,000

Sponsored by Penguin Publishing Group, the Annual Signet Classic Scholarship Essay Contest is open to high school juniors and seniors. Applicants are required to write an essay on one of five selected topics listed on the main website. This year's essay competition is based on the book, "Little Women." Essay topics are posted at the provider's main website.

For more information and to apply, please visit Penguin Publishing Group's Signet Classics Student Scholarship Essay Contest

Wells Fargo CollegeSTEPS Sweepstakes

Deadline: June 30, 2016
Available to: High School Freshman through Graduate Student
Maximum Award: $1,000

Whether you're on your way to college or already there, there are two big things you probably need: money and information. With Wells Fargo, you have a chance to get both.

If you're a high school or college student and you sign up to receive college planning and money management information from Wells Fargo, you'll be automatically entered in the CollegeSTEPS sweepstakes for a chance to win $5,000.

For more information and to apply, please visit Wells Fargo CollegeSTEPS Sweepstakes

Google Lime Scholarship for Students with Disabilities

Deadline: December 6, 2015
Available to: College Undergraduates through Graduate Students
Maximum Award: $10,000

Google is committed to helping the innovators of the future make the most of their talents by providing scholarships and networking retreats for computer science students with disabilities. Recipients will each receive a scholarship as well as be invited to attend the annual Google Scholars' Retreat at the Googleplex in Mountain View, California.

Undergraduates, graduates, or PhD students currently enrolled at a university in the U.S. or Canada are eligible to apply. Students should be pursuing a computer science or computer engineering degree or in a closely related technical field.

Students must have a visible or invisible disability, exemplify leadership, and demonstrate passion for computer science and technology.

For more information and to apply, please visit Google Lime Scholarship for Students with Disabilities

Dell Scholars Program

Deadline: January 15, 2016
Available to: High school seniors
Maximum Award:$20,000 plus a laptop and textbook credits

The Dell Scholars Program enables more under-served students with financial need to achieve their greatest potential through higher education. Dell Scholars are students who demonstrate their desire and ability to overcome barriers and to achieve their goals.

Students must be graduating from an accredited high school the year in which the scholarship is awarded while maintaining a 2.4 GPA. Students must participate in a MSDF approved college readiness program for a minimum of two years and plan to enter a bachelor’s degree program in the fall directly after graduation from high school. Applicants must demonstrate financial need and be eligible to receive a federal Pell Grant in their first year of college.

In addition to the $20,000 scholarship, Dell will supply scholarship recipients with a laptop and textbook credits.

For more information and to apply, please visit Dell Scholars Program

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Cracking the New SAT

Oct 12, 2015

by Christina Zhou

If you've been studying for the old SAT, you only have a short amount of time left to take it. This standardized test is undergoing a redesigning process, a fact that leaves many high school students even more stressed about the test than before, especially juniors and seniors girding themselves for college applications. All the prep books from past years are obsolete! However, given what we currently know about the future format of the SAT, there are several ways to get ahead of the game and do well despite the unfamiliar format.
  • If you don't know, guess. Although the old SAT format penalized guessing by a deduction of a quarter of a point per wrong answer, the new SAT has no such penalty. Therefore, it is in your best interest to provide an answer for each question, especially if you're running out of time. Leaving questions blank is now the worst decision. Additionally, the number of possible choices per question is being reduced. So now if you guess wildly, you will have a greater chance of being right than before.
  • Forget vocab lists. No longer will you have to frantically memorize huge lists of practically obsolete vocabulary words in order to do well on the reading section of the SAT. The new SAT will have terminology more likely to be seen in the real world.
  • Other subjects matter. The new SAT will include either an excerpt from one of America's founding documents or issues discussing freedom, injustice and the like. Therefore, it would be in your best interest to become familiarized with some of the more well-known documents to save time during the test. Additionally, skills like graph reading and analysis, usually seen more in science subjects, will be featured in the new format.
  • Don't stress it. An increasingly high number of colleges are eschewing standardized tests as part of the admission process, turning it into a voluntary option. If you don’t do well the first time, study hard and try again, but don’t be discouraged.
  • And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

This past Saturday at 9 a.m., players arrived at the University of Cincinnati's basketball arena for a two-day tournament hosted by the UC's League of...Legends? Yes: The university now considers League of Legends an official club sport, just like soccer or rugby. With 14,000 people watching the tournament online, the event became one of the largest collegiate e-sports events with participants competing for a $2,000 cash prize. But is it a game or is it a sport?

Though skeptical at first, UC's administration finally caved and are now seeing the benefits of the League. There has been increased visibility for video gamers across campuses, especially now that it's organized and holds educational value. Gaming competitions are legitimized through rules and regulations, though not yet under the rule of the NCAA. Furthermore, the U.S. government allows professional video gamers to use "athlete visas" to travel internationally to compete. With this trend, one may argue that video games aren't necessarily becoming more popular but rather it's a "formalization and institutionalization of what's always been present."

Robert Morris University in Chicago became the first U.S. college to make competitive gaming a varsity sport and offer video game scholarships up to half of tuition and housing, roughly $19,000. Video game sponsors helped RMU create the ideal gaming room with high-tech monitors, headsets and chairs so that students resemble fighter pilots. Though they fell short to the University of British Columbia in the 2015 North American Collegiate Championship, RMU competitors still received $15,000 in scholarships while UBC took home the $30,000 championship trophy.

What do you think about getting paid to game? If you are an avid gamer and want to be rewarded for your talent and passion, check out some video game and design scholarships to celebrate International Games Day on November 21st.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

Last week, a Mount Holyoke College professor allegedly went around his class trying to guess what racial slurs minority students might have been called in their lifetime. Students claimed the exercise was a form of racial discrimination. In this day and age, we are more politically correct than ever before. College students now think twice before raising their hands to offer an opinion on sensitive or controversial topics. Similarly, professors have become more reluctant to analyze and dissect material that may trigger negative emotional responses. We fear that what we may say will offend someone else, even if we had not intended to do so. There has been a large "institutionalization of microagression" - small actions or word choices that are not intended to be malicious but are considered violent nonetheless. Where there once was the freedom of academic speech and healthy debating of opposing ideas, there is now a constant defense of students' emotions. This coddling, which infantilizes and diminishes intellectual discussion now exists to prevent countless lawsuits and could be considered an overprotection of "adult" students' psyches. For students looking to take on adulthood in college, should that require thicker skin and learning to listen to, and accept other people's opinions?

Best discussed in The Atlantic, there has been a drastic climate change in America's higher education where we have elevated the "goals of protecting students from psychological harm." This new "vindictive protectiveness" is believed to have emerged during the 1980s, in order to protect women and minority individuals from offensive speech. There is now a strong censorship of speech and of intellectual thinking for students and professors. Cautious to not offend anyone or for fear that students may cry victim at the slightest opposition to their opinion, institutions have implemented trigger warnings - alerts that professors issue if they sense strong emotional discomfort from students. Professor Hill, English professor at Mount Holyoke had asked his students to give examples of modern day racial slurs – within the context of analyzing Robinson Crusoe and the book's use of the term "papist". Going around the classroom, Professor Hill had pointed out specific minorities and guessed what racial slurs may have been used to describe. Students took offense to this exercise and later detailed the insensible and discriminatory nature of the lesson.

President Obama has taken to the issue of coddled college students, microaggression, and culture of victimhood and stated, "I don't agree you have to be coddled and protected from different points of view. Anybody who comes to speak to you and you disagree with, you should have an argument with them, but you shouldn't silence them by saying you can't come because I'm too sensitive to hear what you have to say." How, if at all, can we find a balance between free academic speech and protecting students' emotions?

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Erica Lewis

Oh, yes, group projects. When it comes to group projects, you either love 'em or hate 'em. There's really no in-between. So how do you keep your cool when you can't stand your partners or the project itself?

  • Divide the work evenly. Don't let one person do all the work and then have the other names attached to the project. Although the load may be carried more heavily by one person, it's important to make sure that everyone plays an important role and is kept up to date. This is crucial if you're doing a group presentation and not simply submitting the project.
  • Make use of in-class work time. Many professors will give groups time in class to work on their projects. There may not be enough time to accomplish everything during this period, but it can help everyone figure out their individual tasks so you don’t have to do more work than necessary. It's also a great time to ask questions if you are unsure about any instructions or requirements.
  • Set deadlines even if they aren't assigned. The project isn't due until the end of the semester, so you can put it off, right? Wrong. However tempting it may be to procrastinate, it is better to set deadlines for your group even if the professor hasn’t assigned them. Schedule a meeting with all the group members and hold everyone accountable for their job. It just makes things easier in the long run.
  • Group projects don't have to be a daunting task, and neither does paying for school. Make sure to keep checking out your scholarship opportunities.

    Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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