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The Best Music to Study To

July 8, 2011

The Best Music to Study To

by Kayla Herrera

When I pop in my earbuds, I prefer the serenity of indie music, some folk and the folly of alternative rock like Mumford & Sons, The Last Royals and Cage the Elephant. The girl that passes me on the street might find refuge in show tunes and the guy who passes her can’t get enough of death metal. But what music aids students most during study time? The answer is just as varied as the musical tastes listed above.

I find indie artist Noah and the Whale to be a helpful study aid, especially while reading. This band is calm, somewhat folksy and envelopes my brain in a veil of tranquility. The tunes add to my thoughts rather than blocking them. I also enjoy Laura Marling, who often sings with Noah and the Whale and has an equally calming indie sound.

If you prefer metal to help you combat your tyrant-like homework, then I highly suggest Every Time I Die. Keith Buckley will blow you away with his vocals while tantalizing your mind. In a weird way, this band is soothing, like a deep-tissue massage, and allows you to focus on the task at hand. I don’t know how it works but this always helps me when I study math or science; when I'm reading, not so much.

More of a rap person? Don’t opt for Eminem – you will focus more on his lyrics than your homework – but try the subtle beats of Kid Cudi and his many remixes instead. His songs are relaxing, his voice is gentle and his songs encompass alluring melodies.

If pop music is your thing, you can’t go wrong with Lady Gaga. Her songs are motivational, inspirational and make you want to get up and DO something! Her catalog is also the perfect fuel for an all-nighter.

Whatever your taste, there’s music out there that will make your brain’s wheels turn in the right direction. Find out what works best for you!

In addition to being a Scholarships.com virtual intern, Michigan Tech student Kayla Herrera is a media coordinator for the Michigan Tech Youth Programs, a writer for The Daily News in Iron Mountain, Mich., and a writer for Examiner.com. She love a tantalizing, action-packed video game and can't get enough of horror movies (Stephen King's books always have her in their grip, though she prefers the old over the new). Writing is what she has always done, and that is what she is here to do.

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Finding a Summer Job Late in the Game

June 14, 2011

Finding a Summer Job Late in the Game

by Kayla Herrera

Spring semester ends and summer rolls in with its blossoming heat and sunny days. Summer classes are starting up, birds are gathering in trees to sing their summery tunes and some students are starting their job search...late.

I tend to start looking for a summer job in the early spring in order to secure a position but if you have a particularly demanding spring semester class schedule, you’re not going to get this kind of head start. In an injured economy, it’s difficult to find a job, especially in smaller college towns that are not located near metropolitan areas. Many businesses are often family-owned – there are lots in my college town – which usually eliminates anyone outside of the family for employment.

The best thing to initiate late in the job hunt is to check with your school. Ask around to see if there are any openings for summer help. The admissions office is a good place to start but dining services is also a great hidden opportunity. With the lack of summer students, your school will probably be looking for help. I joined up with a catering service through my school where I work weddings and class reunions and – get this – set my own hours.

The most important advice about any type of job hunting is that you cannot be picky. I cannot stress this enough. If you've got rent and bills to pay, you've got to make money somehow. Apply everywhere – gas stations, gift shops, restaurants, department stores – and if you’ve still got nothing, fast-food might have to be an option. At least fill out an application; you can always decline the offer if you find something else. With today's economy, cash-strapped college students can’t afford to cherry pick. The race is on, time is ticking and money is waiting to be made.

In addition to being a Scholarships.com virtual intern, Michigan Tech student Kayla Herrera is a media coordinator for the Michigan Tech Youth Programs, a writer for The Daily News in Iron Mountain, Mich., and a writer for Examiner.com. She love a tantalizing, action-packed video game and can't get enough of horror movies (Stephen King's books always have her in their grip, though she prefers the old over the new). Writing is what she has always done, and that is what she is here to do.

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Gaming on a College Budget

June 20, 2011

Gaming on a College Budget

by Kayla Herrera

If you are a gamer in college like me, you know how difficult it is to choose between saving money for school and buying that video game that just came out. You know you have to pay for cable and electricity but that video game is so enticing! But trust me, my gaming friends: It’s possible to game successfully and pay the bills!

As you probably know, there are tons of free games online; naturally, some are low-quality but if you dig, you'll find pretty good free games. For a classic, try Tetris Friends; I have become addicted to this site – it’s a nice way to fill what little free time you may have.

If you are looking for something more adventurous, get Steam. Steam is an online gaming platform that I mentioned briefly in my piece about long-distance dating. It runs smoothly, has a large selection of free games and games for purchase, offers demos of new releases and stores your games for you on your computer. The negative part? It's almost too easy to purchase games. It's thrilling to find a game you've been dying to have, click a button and own it but this can be bad news if you’re trying to watch your spending.

There is always the opportunity to get an emulator, which acts as a console and allows you to play older games from Sega Genesis or Nintendo 64 on your computer for free. All you need to do is download the emulator and start searching for games – easy and entertaining.

College gamers don’t have to break the bank; you just have to know how to wiggle your way through the system. The best part is you'll still have enough for groceries!

In addition to being a Scholarships.com virtual intern, Michigan Tech student Kayla Herrera is a media coordinator for the Michigan Tech Youth Programs, a writer for The Daily News in Iron Mountain, Mich., and a writer for Examiner.com. She love a tantalizing, action-packed video game and can't get enough of horror movies (Stephen King's books always have her in their grip, though she prefers the old over the new). Writing is what she has always done, and that is what she is here to do.

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Handling Pests in Off-Campus Housing

May 26, 2011

Handling Pests in Off-Campus Housing

by Kayla Herrera

When the campus dormitories have run their course and you are ready to have a room bigger than a closet, living in off-campus housing can be an exciting experience. Be forewarned, however, that you may have to deal with pests. No, I’m not talking about rude, unkempt roommates but insects, rodents and other undomesticated animals.

As a college student, you may have never dealt with a pest on your own before. I sure hadn't...until recently. During finals week, I heard scratching in my ceiling. I ignored it but after returning from a week-long trip, the source of the scratching revealed itself. I screamed, “it” crawled into the ceiling and I covered the holes with duct tape, still not knowing what the creature was. I called my landlord but he was out of town and said he'd take care of it on Monday. That weekend, a friend and I heard the scratching again, this time from the kitchen. “There it is!” screamed my friend as I tried to chase “it” out the door. “It” jumped behind the couch then flew back into the kitchen (I had no idea that “it” could fly!). My friend held a pot so we could capture “it” but when “it” ran toward her, she panicked and dropped the pot on top of the creature, paralyzing it. “It” – what we later found out was a flying squirrel – died soon after.

So off-campus dwellers, if you hear animal noises or have a large amount of insects inside your rental unit, call your landlord immediately. It’s their responsibility to get rid of the problem for you and if he or she doesn't or refuses to help, he or she is breaking the law.

In addition to being a Scholarships.com virtual intern, Michigan Tech student Kayla Herrera is a media coordinator for the Michigan Tech Youth Programs, a writer for The Daily News in Iron Mountain, Mich., and a writer for Examiner.com. She love a tantalizing, action-packed video game and can't get enough of horror movies (Stephen King's books always have her in their grip, though she prefers the old over the new). Writing is what she has always done, and that is what she is here to do.

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Long-Distance Relationships in College

How to Make Them Work Over Summer Break

May 18, 2011

Long-Distance Relationships in College

by Kayla Herrera

So you met during orientation the first week of college and you two really hit it off. Fall semester flies by and the snow comes in heavy waves. Spring semester comes in like a lion and, as the leaves show themselves on the trees after a long winter's nap, you realize you are happier than ever. Now summer is here, you are staying at school to take classes and he/she is going home. What now?

This summer is the first real summer my boyfriend and I would've spent apart in different places so I've developed some tips for others in the same situation on how to deal:

  • Texting is okay – an “I love you!” on your phone when you are least expecting it is always nice – but don't overdo it with long conversations via texting. If it's important, make a phone call.
  • Give those thumbs a rest and call each other...but not every night. It will get boring and if a call is missed, someone will get mad, a fight will ensue and no one will be very happy at all.
  • Mix it up a little and use Skype – it’s nice to see a face every once in a while! My boyfriend and I set up Skype dates and we watch TV together like we used to.
  • For gaming couples, add each other as friends on Steam (an online game platform), set up times to play games together and chat while doing so.

You may miss your significant other but stay busy! Intern, volunteer, hang out with friends, spend time with your parents, study hard, whatever...it’ll make for a more productive summer and you won't be constantly checking your phone. Plus, fall semester will be here before you know it!

In addition to being a Scholarships.com virtual intern, Michigan Tech student Kayla Herrera is a media coordinator for the Michigan Tech Youth Programs, a writer for The Daily News in Iron Mountain, Mich., and a writer for Examiner.com. She love a tantalizing, action-packed video game and can't get enough of horror movies (Stephen King's books always have her in their grip, though she prefers the old over the new). Writing is what she has always done, and that is what she is here to do.

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Creating Cultural Change at Your School

October 14, 2011

Creating Cultural Change at Your School

by Kayla Herrera

We are not happy with the way things are at our schools on occasion. Something feels off, something does not seem fair, processes get complicated and emotions get stirred. Sometimes a school can benefit from a little cultural change and you can help get it started!

My school is basically an engineering school. Engineers are viewed and treated as royalty while other majors are left out in the dust and not provided with nearly as many opportunities. This has been a problem for the longest time and I am tired of complaining...so I’m changing things up. I intend to create a career fair for those who are not engineering students. As I mentioned in a recent article, companies mainly participate in our career fair to snag a good engineer and students with other majors (like me) do not participate because of this.

So what do you do if you want to change the way things are at your school? First, you need to get in contact with the right people. Interview faculty. Talk to students. Get your facts straight and get allies. From there, advertise your plan and goals. If you are passionate enough and have a great support group, it is possible that what you are trying to accomplish could be a success. Keep at it, learn from any mistakes and continue to pursue your goal. It only takes one person to start a wave of change – and how amazing would it be to be that one person?

Take note that campus culture does not change overnight, especially in my case. It could be years before my idea becomes a reality but this shift has to start somewhere!

In addition to being a Scholarships.com virtual intern, Michigan Tech student Kayla Herrera is a media coordinator for the Michigan Tech Youth Programs, a writer for The Daily News in Iron Mountain, Mich., and a writer for Examiner.com. She love a tantalizing, action-packed video game and can't get enough of horror movies (Stephen King's books always have her in their grip, though she prefers the old over the new). Writing is what she has always done, and that is what she is here to do.

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Intro to Paranormal Investigation

October 24, 2011

Intro to Paranormal Investigation

by Kayla Herrera

Here at Michigan Tech, ghost hunting and paranormal investigation have become hot trends. It may seem like a strange extracurricular activity at first but my school is located in the perfect place for it: Further north past the busiest towns on this side of the Upper Peninsula, old mining towns sit against the woods. What happened here so many years ago? Over the summer, my friend and I decided to find out. We did extensive research on the area and we finally obtained access into a building that was used as the old hospital. It was an experience neither of us will ever forget, partly because of our findings and partly because we went about our exploration in the right way.

There are rules when it comes to digging around a town’s history that must be followed. First, get permission. I know it may seem like a person would never let you tromp around in a historical location but trust me: It’s much more respectful to get permission rather than trespassing and going home in a cop car. If you have a legitimate reason for your exploration – like photography or paranormal investigation, the latter of which we cited as our objective – the chances of receiving permission are pretty good.

Next, be safe. Wear proper clothing like sneakers, long sleeves and pants – no heels or skirts, girls! Also, don’t conduct your investigation in a big group. It’s noisy and disrespectful to the property owners, surrounding neighbors and those who have passed on or were buried on the site.

Lastly, enjoy the experience! The findings from our investigation were staggering: I was touched twice by a “spirit” – it felt like cold spider webs the first time and like someone covered in spider webs brushed past me in a hurry the second time – and we recorded a few EVPs (disembodied voices). All the eresearch and planning paid off and it will change the way I view the paranormal forever. If you’re interested in giving it a try, see if your school has a paranormal club. Who knows, you might even get course credit for participating!

In addition to being a Scholarships.com virtual intern, Michigan Tech student Kayla Herrera is a media coordinator for the Michigan Tech Youth Programs, a writer for The Daily News in Iron Mountain, Mich., Examiner.com and WHOA Magazine. She love a tantalizing, action-packed video game and can't get enough of horror movies (Stephen King's books always have her in their grip, though she prefers the old over the new). Writing is what she has always done, and that is what she is here to do.

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What to Do About a Negligent Landlord

November 1, 2011

What to Do About a Negligent Landlord

by Kayla Herrera

I have tons of horror stories about roommates and housing but the one connective thread is an unprofessional landlord. While I can’t tell you why this problem is so prominent in many college towns, I can guide you on how to deal with it.

First, know your rights. Look up your state’s tenant laws and make note of them. In Michigan, a tenant has the right to withhold all or part of rent depending on the problem until the apartment is fixed. We’re not talking broken lights or chipped paint, though – think more along the lines of pests, unusable plumbing and no electricity.

Next, reread your lease. Whenever you sign a lease, make sure to 1. read it thoroughly and 1. get a copy. (My landlord didn’t even give me a copy of my lease and I had to email him several times to get it.) If the lease does not say anything about apartment fixes (it should), do not sign it until it’s amended. If the landlord complains, cite the tenant laws to support your case.

Lastly, be confident and remain firm in all dealings with your landlord, especially if the issue is detrimental to your health or living. For example, my neighbor has had bad plumbing since July but even after multiple complaints, the landlord hadn’t remedied the issue by October. She knew her rights, though, and together we sent the landlord an email stating she was moving out and he would be responsible for finding a replacement tenant...but not until the apartment was fixed. We also said if immediate action was not taken, we would call a health inspector (also due to persistent flying squirrel incidents in several apartments). Needless to say, the landlord agreed in a panic and we were able to avoid going to court over the matter – a mess we definitely didn’t need during midterm time.

If you follow these tips, even the worst landlord ever can be dealt with. Good luck, renters!

In addition to being a Scholarships.com virtual intern, Michigan Tech student Kayla Herrera is a media coordinator for the Michigan Tech Youth Programs and is a writer for The Daily News in Iron Mountain, Mich., Examiner.com and WHOA Magazine. She love a tantalizing, action-packed video game and can't get enough of horror movies (Stephen King's books always have her in their grip, though she prefers the old over the new). Writing is what she has always done, and that is what she is here to do.

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How to Make It as a Humanities Major at a Tech School

September 28, 2011

How to Make It as a Humanities Major at a Tech School

by Kayla Herrera

Sometimes the location of a college or university can draw you in more than the school itself. This can be said for someone who wants to attend college in a big city or someone who wants more of a college town setting. Me? I wanted to go home again. I went to a technological school in the place where I once moved away from. Even though my major of choice was not technical in nature, I told myself I could make it work.

At my school, the humanities department is not taken care of very well. The curriculum seldom expands and many professors are not quite sure what they are doing. There is a career fair every semester but companies mainly come for engineers, leaving us humanities majors left out and forced to try harder to find jobs and make connections without the school’s assistance.

How did I do it? I focused on extracurricular activities. I searched for internships and small writing jobs on my own or through professors at my school. That is how I scored my first internship and first freelance writing job – just by asking around and putting myself out there. Also, get involved in a club or organization that relates to your career interests. If one is not available, create one; chances are, there are other students who share your goals.

If your field is the minority at your school, you’ve got to stick your neck out there and really make yourself known. Classes at my school are limited so I rely on outside experience to round me out. You cannot be shy: Send your resume around even if positions haven’t been advertised and contact potential employers to introduce yourself. Putting forth that extra effort will only get you that much more ahead outside the classroom.

In addition to being a Scholarships.com virtual intern, Michigan Tech student Kayla Herrera is a media coordinator for the Michigan Tech Youth Programs, a writer for The Daily News in Iron Mountain, Mich., and a writer for Examiner.com. She love a tantalizing, action-packed video game and can't get enough of horror movies (Stephen King's books always have her in their grip, though she prefers the old over the new). Writing is what she has always done, and that is what she is here to do.

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Will You Go Out With Us?

Couple Dating in College

October 7, 2011

Will You Go Out With Us?

by Kayla Herrera

When college students couple up, they sometimes become hermits and for couples that live together, this behavior is even more prevalent. It doesn’t have to be your way of life, though! Break free from the monotony and try this rising trend among students here at Michigan Tech: couple dating.

Girls need girl time and boys need boy time so in addition to spending time with the friends you had before you were in a relationship, find another couple you’d like to get to know better and plan a night out. Go bowling, go out to eat or see a movie. Any time I’ve been on a couple date, the other girl and I kind of have our own conversation going while the guys talk about their things. This is a great way to have that girl time or boy time without having to completely move around a jam-packed schedule.

I know you’re thinking couple dating sounds like something only people in their 30s and older do but it really isn’t. I speak from experience: Couple dating made my own relationship more exciting and resilient! After a successful couple date, all parties are generally happy and refreshed. You can hang out with your loved one – which can be hard if you have opposite class and work schedules – and socialize with others at the same time. Don’t ever feel like you are becoming “that old couple” – you’re just making new friends and having fun in a more convenient way!

In addition to being a Scholarships.com virtual intern, Michigan Tech student Kayla Herrera is a media coordinator for the Michigan Tech Youth Programs, a writer for The Daily News in Iron Mountain, Mich., and a writer for Examiner.com. She love a tantalizing, action-packed video game and can't get enough of horror movies (Stephen King's books always have her in their grip, though she prefers the old over the new). Writing is what she has always done, and that is what she is here to do.

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