Blog

How to Ensure a Successful College Visit

Jul 6, 2015

by Emily Rabinowitz

Summer is in full swing and for most high school students, that means it's time for college tours! Throughout my four years of high school, I visited and toured nearly 20 different universities to find what worked for me. In an effort to ease your college touring adventures, here's what helped me:

  • Plan ahead. During the summer and school breaks, college tours fill up quickly. Remember to book your tour, hotel and other details in advance. Try not to plan too many visits on the same day, as tours can be a lot of walking.
  • Get in touch with Great Aunt Millie. Whether they're across the country or in a neighboring state, chances are you know someone who can serve as an "excuse" to visit that school you've been dreaming of. If you don't have family near one of your schools, consider finding a fun family attraction nearby; after long days of college tours, everyone needs a little fun! (Pro tip: Cedar Point Amusement Park in Ohio is awesome if you're taking a road trip to visit Midwest schools!)
  • Communication is key. Even though it may seem like it, your parents can't read your mind so tell them what is important to you in a school. In my experience, parents can use a reminder that college applications are hard and time consuming; the tour process is mainly to help you decide which schools you will apply to.
  • Stay positive. Remember that college is a buyer's market: When looking at schools, you have the deciding power. The more you can see yourself at a school, the better your application will be. Trust me, the readers will see this as they review your materials.
  • Be honest with yourself. If you're like me, you started off with over 20 potential schools. At some point, you'll need to cross some off the list. Listen to your gut and trust that you will end up somewhere great!
  • Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (0)

    Political/Civic Engagement: Why and How to Get Involved

    Jul 2, 2015

    by Emily Rabinowitz

    It's July and we all know what that means: an abundance of red, white, and blue, fireworks bursting in the sky, parades lining the streets, patriotic anthems filling the air. In the thrill of such a classic celebration, it is easy for us to forget that which we are celebrating: freedom. This year, after the fireworks stop ringing in your ears, try participating in one of these volunteer ideas.

    Support Your Troops. One of the best ways to give back to your nation is to support the troops. The Veterans Association offers easy ways to get involved, like programs for volunteers at local veterans' homes and opportunities to welcome home the troops at your airport. Your local veterans' organizations may also need volunteers to decorate graves, host parades and events, and support disabled veterans. If you are part of a community service group such as Boy Scouts or Girl Scouts, consider the many campaigns you can participate in from donating cell phones to sending care packages.

    Participate in Politics. We are lucky to be preparing for an election year, which means that national, state and local campaigns are in need of volunteers to help with America's long-standing democratic traditions. The best way to get involved is to add your name to the email list; you will be invited to phone banks, rallies and events, and social media campaigns. (Find your congressmen here.) Even campaigning for local governors or state senators can be a great opportunity: I once received free tickets to see the First Lady speak at a campaign I was volunteering for!

    Find a Cause. If you are not interested in supporting politicians, consider the local and national causes that might need your help. Organizations ranging from the Sierra Club (which focuses on environmental protection) to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention all engage in lobbying campaigns to enact legislation. Whether it’s nationally or locally, you can directly contribute to the laws you care about.

    And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (0)

    Posted Under:

    Internships , Tips , Virtual Intern

    Tags:


    The Educational Value of Facebook

    Jul 2, 2015

    by Chris Bernardi

    Are you one of the billion users who enjoys posting or viewing status updates, pictures or articles on Facebook? While Facebook and other social media sites have often been viewed as a distraction in the workplace and classroom, a first-of-its-kind study shows the educational value of these forums that can help students learn scientific literacy and other complex subjects.

    Conducted by Michigan State University’s Christine Greenhow, the study found high school and college students engage in vigorous, intelligent debates about scientific issues when using voluntary forums. The study was composed of 16-25 students who voluntarily joined a Facebook app that dealt with climate and related science news such as coal-burning regulations and environmentally friendly housing. After analyzing the student’s activity on the app, Greenhow found that their discussions on various science issues were on-topic, civil and sophisticated. The findings contradict previous studies which supported critics’ theories that excessive social media use distracted kids from academics, spurred loneliness and depression, and facilitated cyberbullying.

    “One of the things we struggle with as educators is how to take students’ spark of interest in something and develop it in ways that can serve them,” said Greenhow, assistant professor of educational psychology and educational technology. “If students had these kinds of niche communities to be part of, in addition to their formal curriculum, that could really provide a rich environment for them.” These finding make a case for the use of social media outlets as learning tools: They provide a huge push to integrate new technology into classrooms and should spur more consideration to this informal online learning that occurs in students’ natural environments.

    Would you use a Facebook app that allowed you and your classmates to debate educational material? Do you think Facebook is more of a distraction to students than educational tool?

    And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (2)

    Posted Under:

    College Life , High School News , Just for Fun , Tips

    Tags:


    Enrolling at a Branch Campus vs. a Main Campus

    Jul 1, 2015

    by Ashley Grego

    When most people hear Penn State, they think of the college town located in State College famous for Beaver Stadium and football. It's less likely that people think of the other Penn States - the branch campuses. Technically, they are the same university...but perception is different.

    Although main campuses may offer more activities, different classes and a completely different lifestyle than branch campuses, it doesn't necessarily mean one is better than the other. In fact, there are benefits of branch campuses that students should consider before attending the main campus.

    First, branches are smaller and offer students a closer experience with professors and students. If students prefer one-on-one connections with their professors and classmates where everybody knows each other's names, branches can offer this. This can also make for an easier transition for students coming from smaller high schools.

    Second, some branches are completely different from the main. Some branches specialize in specific majors – a benefit for students in those majors. (For example, UConn's Avery Point campus in Groton offers specialization for marine sciences.) Another example of this is branch campuses outside of the country. Unlike study abroad, the student will not be attending a different college and earning transfer credits toward their university: They will be attending their school branched overseas, like Carnegie Mellon's branch in Qatar. Another benefit? Experiencing college abroad can be cheaper than study abroad!

    Third, regardless of attending a branch or main, all of the diplomas (at least at most schools) will say the same thing. Even though I attend UPJ, my diploma will read "graduate of the University of Pittsburgh." This can provide an automatic boost to students who may think attending the branch will negate the rest of their resume.

    The last benefit of attending a branch campus is even if students do not plan to attend the branch campus for all four years, transferring credits will be easier. By staying within the same university system, students are less likely lose any credits because most classes at a branch campus are at the main campus.

    Although branch campuses are not for every student, they are certainly something to consider!

    And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (4)

    Top 5 Lessons of a Part-Time Job

    Jun 24, 2015

    by Emily Rabinowitz

    The summer before my senior year, most of my peers interned at prestigious companies, traveled the world, or spent hours writing college essays and studying for the SAT. I, on the other hand, got a part time position earning $8.25 an hour at Old Navy.

    As I prepare for college this year, I can safely say that my job experience is one of my biggest assets. Here's what I learned:

    • Responsibility. One of my first shifts was the infamous One Dollar Flip Flop Day. With constant lines and eight-hour shifts, I learned responsibility. When on the sales floor, I could not lapse into rudeness even when I had a difficult customer, check my phone even when my friends texted me, and I most definitely could not disobey my superiors.
    • Social Issues. Over the course of the past year, I worked every major holiday from Black Friday to New Year’s Eve, allowing me to understand that the world does not stop because school went on vacation. I started to realize how many parents might have to sacrifice Christmas morning with their children in order to put dinner on the table.
    • Spending. My favorite meal at Chipotle costs about $12 - that is over an hour of work! This came as a shock to me and triggered me to begin tracking my spending and even opening a savings account to lock away future funds.
    • Experience. Having a year in retail, let alone employment, made me marketable. I was able to secure a second job within a month of applying. My job will also transfer with me to college.
    • Respect. In a workplace environment, everyone is your equal. In learning to respect my colleagues, I have gained insight from people in dozens of walks of life.

    Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (0)

    Colleges Where You Can Earn a Degree for Free

    Jun 16, 2015

    by Suada Kolovic

    Here at Scholarships.com, we make a point to advocate the importance of funding your college education the right way (for free!) and while financing your higher education solely with scholarships is an amazing feat, there is another factor to consider: colleges with no tuition to be begin with. Yup, they totally exist – check out the 11 colleges below where you can earn a degree for free:

    We should also mention that elite universities with healthy endowments also tout financial aid programs that pay 100 percent of tuition, room and board and fees for students from families with certain incomes – $75,000 or less at MIT, $65,000 or less at Harvard and Yale, and $60,000 or less at Columbia, Cornell, Stanford, Duke, Brown and Texas A&M. For a more detailed look at any of the schools listed or hundreds of other universities, check out our College Search. And let us know where you’re heading this fall in the comments section!

    Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (27)

    Hundreds of Colleges Still Accepting Applications

    May 26, 2015

    by Suada Kolovic

    High school seniors, are you down about not getting a fat envelope from any of the colleges you applied to? College students, are you looking to transfer from your existing institution? Don't freak out: There are hundreds of colleges that are still accepting applications.

    According to the National Association for College Admission Counseling's (NACAC) annual College Openings Update, hundreds of schools are still accepting applications for freshmen and transfers as of May 26th. The list is comprised of schools that didn't fill all open spots for next year's freshman class, are seeking transfer students or have enrollment deposit deadlines later than the May 1st norm. While the majority of schools on the list are small, private colleges with enrollment between 1,000 and 5,000 students, there are a few large, public institutions on the list, too. Check out a sampling below:

    For the full list of colleges still accepting applications, click here. Will you be taking advantage of this helpful resource?

    And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (11)

    Seven Tips for Repaying Your Student Loans

    May 22, 2015

    by Suada Kolovic

    If you're a recent college graduate, chances are you’ll have to start paying off your student loans sooner than you think. And even with the economy in a slump, don’t expect a free pass on not paying your loans. Are you starting to panic? Well, don’t! There’s a ton of advice out there to help students stay on track and courtesy of the U.S. News and World Report, here are seven tips for repaying your student loans.

    • Repay you student loans automatically. Make things easier on yourself by setting up automatic withdrawals from your bank account. This reduces the chance of late or missing payments.
    • Aim for 10 years. The traditional repayment period for student loans is 10 years and ideally you'll be able to pay off all your debt within that time period. If you end up struggling with your monthly payments, however, you could stretch out your loans to 20 or even 30 years. Your monthly payments will become more manageable but you will end up paying a lot more in interest.
    • Stay organized. Having multiple student loans can be a challenge to keep track of but with the government's National Student Loan Data System, you’ll be able to track all your federal student loans in one place.
    • Pay off the loans with the highest interest rates first. A high interest rate costs you every month and compounds that amount you owe every month you aren’t paying off the entire balance.
    • Consider IBR. The IBR is a federal Income-Based Repayment program that allows a borrower to repay his or her federal loans based on what is affordable and not what is owed.
    • Keep abreast of student loan developments. Staying informed is just as important as making your payments. Familiarize yourself with websites that are devoted to college debt issues like Project on Student Debt and the National Consumer Law Center's Student Loan Borrower Assistance Project.
    • Contact the Federal Student Aid Ombudsman. Sometimes your relationship with a lender can go belly-up. If you end up in a dispute, the Federal Student Aid Ombudsman may be able to help resolve the issue.

    Are there any tips you'd like to add? Share your suggestions in the comments section.

    Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (1)

    Want to Earn an Extra Million Dollars? Choose Your Major Wisely

    May 12, 2015

    by Suada Kolovic

    When choosing a major, most would agree that it's important to consider gaining lucrative employment following graduation. In a perfect world, the best college major would simply be the one that interests you most, period. But if you have a particular knack for math or science and aren't necessarily sure where those skills would translate best, consider the kinds of careers that could offer a generous return on your investment.

    According to a new report from Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce, going to college pays off but by how much depends greatly on the area of study. For example, students who complete undergraduate degrees in petroleum engineering earn a median $4.8 million throughout their careers (or $136,000 a year) – more than triple the $1.4 million in median earnings (or $39,000 a year) for someone who majored in early childhood education, the report says. "The surprises are in the details," said Anthony Carnevale, director of the Center on Education and the Workforce. Just choosing a major in a STEM field doesn't secure a hefty paycheck, either: Carnevale's team found that biology majors have median annual wages of $56,000 over their careers from age 25 to 59, or about one-third less than physicists. There are also wide ranges in salaries for specific majors. The top 25 percent of earners who majored in finance can expect annual earnings of more than $100,000, while the bottom quartile may bring in just about $50,000 a year. (For more on this report, head over to the Wall Street Journal.)

    Do you agree with the sentiment that majors that aren't in high demand should be avoided or should students be encouraged to pursue their passion regardless of potentially high unemployment rates? Let us know your thoughts in the comments section.

    Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (53)

    What to Consider Before Opting Out of Standardized Tests

    May 1, 2015

    by Suada Kolovic

    Standardized testing is as much – if not more – a part of the college process as tweeting your acceptance, Snapchatting your new roomies and buying a shower caddy...or at least it used to be: According to reports, there is a growing trend toward test-optional admissions. What does that mean? If a student decided to apply to a test-optional institution, they can choose whether or not to submit ACT/SAT scores as part of their application. Thinking about signing up? Don’t shred your test prep materials into confetti just yet; here are some things to consider, courtesy of Time Magazine:

    • Your academic record: When admissions counselors evaluates a test-optional application, they pay particular attention to grades and the difficulty of the completed curriculum. Students who excel in AP, dual-enrollment, honors and IB courses – and who have the high marks to prove it – may find that test-optional admissions is particularly well suited to them.
    • Your exam history: If your exam results do not reflect your marks on most other academic tasks, test-optional admissions may be right for you.
    • Your prospective schools: Consider the colleges and universities to which you plan on applying. How many of these schools offer test-optional admissions? If even one school requires a standardized exam, it may be worth submitting your scores to every prospective college on your list.
    • Your financial aid prospects: Some academic institutions and outside organizations require ACT/SAT results as part of their decision-making process. Before you commit yourself to test-optional admissions, research the criteria for any grants or scholarships that appeal to you. If test-optional admissions will limit any needed financial aid, it may be best to follow a more traditional admissions path.

    Do you think the test-optional admissions practice is the way of the future? What do you think is a better barometer of qualified applicants: test scores or essays? Share your thoughts in the comments section. And don't forget to try and fund your education with as much free money as possible – a great place to start is by visiting Scholarships.com and conducting a free college scholarship search where you'll get matched with scholarships, grants and other financial aid opportunities that are unique to you!

    And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (2)

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>
    Page 1 of 85

    Recent Posts

    Tags

    ACT (20)
    Advanced Placement (24)
    Alumni (17)
    Applications (83)
    Athletics (17)
    Back To School (73)
    Books (66)
    Campus Life (460)
    Career (115)
    Choosing A College (55)
    College (1014)
    College Admissions (245)
    College And Society (315)
    College And The Economy (378)
    College Applications (148)
    College Benefits (290)
    College Budgets (216)
    College Classes (448)
    College Costs (495)
    College Culture (605)
    College Goals (387)
    College Grants (53)
    College In Congress (88)
    College Life (576)
    College Majors (222)
    College News (601)
    College Prep (166)
    College Savings Accounts (19)
    College Scholarships (159)
    College Search (115)
    College Students (465)
    College Tips (119)
    Community College (59)
    Community Service (40)
    Community Service Scholarships (27)
    Course Enrollment (19)
    Economy (122)
    Education (26)
    Education Study (29)
    Employment (42)
    Essay Scholarship (38)
    FAFSA (55)
    Federal Aid (99)
    Finances (70)
    Financial Aid (415)
    Financial Aid Information (58)
    Financial Aid News (57)
    Financial Tips (40)
    Food (44)
    Food/Cooking (27)
    GPA (80)
    Grades (91)
    Graduate School (56)
    Graduate Student Scholarships (20)
    Graduate Students (65)
    Graduation Rates (38)
    Grants (62)
    Health (38)
    High School (130)
    High School News (73)
    High School Student Scholarships (184)
    High School Students (310)
    Higher Education (110)
    Internships (526)
    Job Search (178)
    Just For Fun (117)
    Loan Repayment (40)
    Loans (48)
    Military (16)
    Money Management (134)
    Online College (20)
    Pell Grant (28)
    President Obama (24)
    Private Colleges (34)
    Private Loans (19)
    Roommates (100)
    SAT (23)
    Scholarship Applications (163)
    Scholarship Information (179)
    Scholarship Of The Week (271)
    Scholarship Search (219)
    Scholarship Tips (87)
    Scholarships (403)
    Sports (62)
    Sports Scholarships (21)
    Stafford Loans (24)
    Standardized Testing (46)
    State Colleges (42)
    State News (35)
    Student Debt (84)
    Student Life (512)
    Student Loans (140)
    Study Abroad (67)
    Study Skills (215)
    Teachers (94)
    Technology (111)
    Tips (508)
    Transfer Scholarship (16)
    Tuition (93)
    Undergraduate Scholarships (35)
    Undergraduate Students (154)
    Volunteer (45)
    Work And College (83)
    Work Study (20)
    Writing Scholarship (18)

    Categories

    529 Plan (2)
    Back To School (360)
    College And The Economy (518)
    College Applications (255)
    College Budgets (347)
    College Classes (575)
    College Costs (763)
    College Culture (945)
    College Grants (133)
    College In Congress (132)
    College Life (984)
    College Majors (337)
    College News (939)
    College Savings Accounts (57)
    College Search (397)
    Coverdell (1)
    FAFSA (116)
    Federal Aid (132)
    Fellowships (23)
    Financial Aid (708)
    Food/Cooking (78)
    GPA (278)
    Graduate School (109)
    Grants (72)
    High School (544)
    High School News (260)
    Housing (172)
    Internships (573)
    Just For Fun (235)
    Press Releases (10)
    Roommates (140)
    Scholarship Applications (223)
    Scholarship Of The Week (347)
    Scholarships (598)
    Sports (77)
    Standardized Testing (59)
    Student Loans (225)
    Study Abroad (62)
    Tips (846)
    Uncategorized (8)
    Virtual Intern (540)