Skip Navigation Links

Four Tips to Financially Prepare Your Student for College

August 19, 2011

Four Tips to Financially Prepare Your Student for College

by Suada Kolovic

It seems like just yesterday that your kid was, well, just a kid, asking for a ride to the movies and throwing a tantrum on the floor. Now your child has walked across their high school stage, tossed that mortarboard in the air and is heading for college in the fall. If this is the first child you’re sending off, it’s normal to be apprehensive about letting go but remember, this is their moment. College is a time for them to discover who they are and figure things out for themselves. That being said, you can help financially prepare your student for college. Check out the four tips from U.S. World and News Report on finding the balance between supplying enough funds and when letting your child struggle is okay:

  • Don’t deposit and dash: Some parents might opt to supply their student with extra spending money for the upcoming school year but it has the potential of backfiring almost instantaneously. If you’re doling out a year’s worth of funds without a framework about budgeting, they’ll be calling for pizza money by October. Take the time to discuss the importance of month-to-month budgeting and understanding the reality of unexpected expenses.
  • Embrace – and limit – financial slip-ups: Once you’ve discussed a budget, step out of the process and leave it up to your child to make it work, recommends clinical psychologist Jerry Weichman. "One of the best things parents can do is to allow your kids to struggle financially for a little bit if they mismanage their money, because the consequences are so much easier for them now versus what that would equate to when they're adults. You learn so much more from your mistakes than your successes."
  • Encourage financial freedom: Having your child work in college is a great way to lower the potential of student loan debt as well as understanding the responsibilities that come with being an adult. Allow your child to allocate earnings, providing them the opportunity to make a connection between money earned and money spent.
  • Utilize web resources: Letting go might be easier said than done, but neither you nor your student need to tackle the upcoming challenges alone. A bevy of financial aid resources is just a click away. Check out Scholarships.com for tips on everything from balancing work and college and where to work on campus to money management skills and tips for going on a budget diet.
Comments

High Schools Seniors: 5 Things to do Before Summer’s Up

August 15, 2011

High Schools Seniors: 5 Things to do Before Summer’s Up

by Suada Kolovic

Ah, senior year. It’s a time chock-full with to-dos, from finalizing your college choice and filling out applications to applying for scholarships and getting your financial aid in order. And with summer slowly coming to a close, it’s a good time for rising high school seniors to realize that some deadlines are just around the corner. So rather than let the last weeks of summer slip away, avoid the fall time crunch and consider U.S. News and World’s top suggestions of five simple things you can do now:

  1. Examine school prices: Relying on just the sticker price when making your college selection is a huge mistake. For the most part, sticker prices are often meaningless. Take the time to do some serious research and understand the real cost of the institutions you’re interested in.
  2. Know deadlines: Keeping track of the various deadlines you’ll have to meet is essential for a successful senior year. In order to make things easier, use Scholarships.com’s calendar as a reference!
  3. Get started on your college essay: Writing a college essay is one of the most nerve-wracking chores high school seniors face. To relieve some of the pressure, start early. Think about it: If you start now, you’re more likely to be able to devote the time needed to do a great job.
  4. Consider supplemental materials: If you’re an artist, musician or actor, applying for colleges (and scholarships!) may be more time consuming. In some cases, you’ll have to audition and have an impressive portfolio to standout. Some schools also require SAT Subject Tests so find out and book exam dates now.
  5. Research: If you haven’t begun researching schools, get started now. Check out schools online, take virtual tours and really consider what qualities are most important to you. Think about what you want out of your college experience – whether it’s a school with a strong academic record, impressive athletic teams or diverse social programs and services – and take a hard look at whether you’re applying to schools for the right reasons.
Comments

Coca-Cola’s $20,000 Scholarship

Deadline Quickly Approaching

October 25, 2010

Coca-Cola’s $20,000 Scholarship

by Suada Kolovic

Are you in search of a scholarship with a huge dollar amount? Coca-Cola’s Scholars Scholarship may be just what you’re looking for. It's an achievement-based scholarship awarded to 250 high school seniors each year. Fifty of these are four-year, $20,000 scholarships ($5,000 per year for four years), while 200 are designated as four-year, $10,000 scholarships ($2,500 per year for four years). And with odds like that, it wouldn’t hurt for you to give it your best shot!

In order to be eligible for a Coca-Cola Scholarship, a student must be a current high school or home-school senior planning to pursue a degree at an accredited U.S. post-secondary institution and have a minimum 3.00 GPA at the end of your junior year of high school. But you better work fast because high school seniors must apply online through October 31. Good luck!

Comments

From College Dropout to Graduate: Kanye West to Join Fashion School

March 7, 2011

From College Dropout to Graduate: Kanye West to Join Fashion School

by Suada Kolovic

Kanye West’s name has become synonymous with controversy, success…and now a degree in fashion?

According to The Sun, the hip-hop superstar applied to study for a master’s degree in fashion at the Central Saint Martins College in London. West arrived in London on Wednesday to discuss his ambitions with the head of the course, Professor Louise Wilson, who has a reputation for making her students cry. A source told The Sun that the rapper has long been an admirer of the school and is serious about studying fashion: “Kanye spends a lot of time with fashion students and often hooks up with Central's arty pupils when he is in London. He already has work experience with Fendi and Louis Vuitton on his CV (curriculum vitae). Now that he has been interviewed the school's board will have to decide whether to allow him to start the MA fashion course later this year."

While he hasn't been accepted yet, this is a major decision for the college because while having Yeezy enrolled would garner major publicity – previous celebrity students have included M.I.A, Stella McCartney and Alexander McQueen – it could also damage the school’s credibility. Unfortunately, if Central Saint Martins doesn’t grant him admission, the school will likely find itself as the target of Mr. West’s next Twitter tirade…though we’re sure Professor Wilson will have a few choice words of her own. Let the admissions games begin!

Comments

Final Exams - The New Health Risk?

Grandmothers Be Advised

September 28, 2010

Final Exams - The New Health Risk?

by Suada Kolovic

The life of the average college student is riddled with papers, mid-terms, all-nighters and of course the untimely tragic death of beloved family members come finals week. Just days into the fall semester, professors say excuses for missing class have already begun to flow: food-borne illnesses, fender-benders, religious holidays, roommate squabbles, registration snafus.

Then there are the grandparents, those poor souls conveniently killed off by college students whose tuition they might even be paying. One commenter on a Chronicle Forums thread on student excuses suggests sending out warning notices to the old folks: "The midterm exam for [course and number] is scheduled for [date]. This puts your life in danger. We recommend that you get a physical exam before that date and avoid all unnecessary travel until the test is over. Grandmothers are particularly at risk."

It happens to the best of us. We’re ill-prepared, panic and give the first excuse our minds can muster. Honesty may be the best policy, but below are a few of the most creative excuses from students who decided to steer away from the classics and put their own special spin on explaining their absence:

  • "My father owns a liquor store and we got a big delivery right before your 11:00 class."
  • "I was absent for yesterday's test because my girlfriend was having a baby."
  • This one is verbatim: "I am really sorry I was not in class today. I some how came down with ammonia and have been really sick for the past 2 days."
  • E-mail just received from student who missed first two classes. Unfortunately it is a once-a-week three-hour block class, so she has missed two weeks of class: "I just found out I am registered for your Wednesday class. I didn't realize I was registered for it. Now that I've found out I'm registered, I would like to attend. Do you think I can still catch up? May I stop by your office and get the syllabus?" I wonder who registered her.
    Comments

    College Dropouts Cost Taxpayers Billions

    October 12, 2010

    College Dropouts Cost Taxpayers Billions

    by Suada Kolovic

    Dropping out of college would surely ruffle a few feathers at home, but it seems mom and dad may not be the only ones affected. While dropping out after a year can translate into lost time and a mountain of debt for the student, now there’s an estimate of what it costs taxpayers: billions.

    According to a report released Monday, states appropriated almost $6.2 billion for four-year colleges and universities between 2003 and 2008 to help pay for the education of students who did not return for year two. The report takes into account spending on average per-student state appropriations, state grants and federal grants – such as Pell grants for low-income students – then reaches its cost conclusions based on students retention rates. It’s worth mentioning though that the report’s conclusions are considered incomplete: Because it’s based on data from the U.S. Education Department, it does not take account of students who attend part time, who leave college in order to transfer to another institution, or who drop out but return later to receive their degrees.

    And with figures in the billions, critics agree that too many students are attending four-year schools – and that pushing them to finish wastes even more taxpayer money. Robert Lerman, an American University economics professor, questions promoting college for all. He said the reports fleshes out the reality of high dropout rates. But it could just as easily be used to argue that less-prepared, less-motivated students are better off not going to college."Getting them to go a second year might waste even more money," Lerman said. "Who knows?"

    Comments

    Tech Mistakes to Avoid as an Online Student

    August 20, 2014

    by Suada Kolovic

    Say what you will about Generation Y but one thing's for sure, they are one tech savvy group. Armed with smartphones, laptops and tablets, they are plugged in and on the go 24/7. And yet, so many students make the same tech mistakes repeatedly. (I’m looking at you, student who hasn't saved their work once in the past hour!) Luckily, U.S. News and World Report has compiled a list of mistakes to avoid when starting school as an online student, check them out below:

    • Not backing up your data: "If I had a nickel for every time a student came to me crying to me, I wouldn’t have to teach," says Margaret Reneau, an instructor in St. Xavier University's online graduate nursing program. Reneau recommends using the online file storage service Dropbox, which offers free accounts of at least two gigabytes. Other options include regular back-ups to an external hard drive or uploading homework to cloud-based Google Docs.
    • Not asking what browser is recommended for your program and courses: Check if your browser is compatible with the learning management system that your program uses and with the technical features in your courses.
    • Not checking your email: Check your school email regularly for important announcements or forward your school emails to your personal account if that's the account you rely on.
    • Not using apps: If your school offers an app, download it. Other apps such as Evernote can help with managing class work deadlines and projects.
    • Not downloading a free reference manager: Free academic software programs like Zotero and Mendeley help students save, manage and cite research resources. This can save students a lot of time by making it easier to collect, organize and share research.

    For the full list of tips, head over to U.S. News and World Report. What do you think of the suggestions? Are there any you'd like to add? Share your thoughts in the comment section. And for more information on preparing for college, head over to our College Prep section!

    Comments

    Smile – Scholarships.com's Awkward Back-to-School Photo Contest is Back!

    August 26, 2014

    by Suada Kolovic

    Ah, the first day of school. You meticulously selected your outfit, you styled your hair just right but when you smiled for the camera, all that awesomeness translated into...complete and total awkwardness. It may be tempting to dispose of the evidence but don’t burn those negatives or delete those jpegs just yet: Those images could earn you $1,000 for college through Scholarships.com’s Awkward Back-to-School Photo Contest!

    To enter Scholarships.com’s Awkward Back-to-School Photo Contest, simply “like” Scholarships.com on Facebook and upload your amateur, school-related photo (first day, class, prom, graduation, etc.) to Scholarships.com’s Facebook wall, making sure to tag yourself and Scholarships.com in the image. Following the September 30th deadline, the Scholarships.com Team will post our top finalists and users will have one week to vote for their favorite photo via comments and likes. The person who submits the photo receiving the most votes will win $1,000 and the individuals who submit the second and third highest-scoring images will receive $200 each.

    Starts: August 26th

    Ends: September 30th

    Number of Awards: 3

    Amount: $1,000 for one first-place winner; $200 each for second- and third-place winners.

    • Step 1: Like Scholarships.com on Facebook.
    • Step 2: Post your school-related to Scholarships.com’s Facebook wall, making sure to tag yourself and Scholarships.com in the image. These photos must be amateur (i.e., not professionally taken), can be current or from years past and must feature the person submitting the photo.
    • Step 3: The Scholarships.com Team will select the top images submitted and let our fans choose a winner via their comments and likes.
    • Step 4: You may enter as many times as you want but please limit your photos to one per day. Those who do not observe this step or who do not tag themselves and Scholarships.com in their photos will be disqualified. You must also adjust your Facebook privacy preferences to allow Scholarships.com to message you. (This is how we'll notify finalists and winners.)

    This scholarship competition is offered by Scholarships.com and is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook.

    For more information and official rules, please click here and for additional scholarship opportunities, conduct a free scholarship search today!

    Comments

    MIT Becomes Dopest College Yet, Offers “Credit for Reddit” Course

    August 29, 2014

    by Suada Kolovic

    The average college student can easily spend the better part of their day on Reddit...where just one more link quickly turns into another sleepless night. Hey, we've all been stuck in this inescapable web before (no one’s judging!) but if you're one of the lucky students attending the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), you'll have the option to receive credit for your Reddit addiction starting next spring.

    MIT researcher and admissions officer Chris Peterson, along with his co-instructor and the head of MIT Comparative Media Studies/Writing Ed Schiappa, built the course's curriculum in part with help from other Reddit users. (The post received 121 comments from users eager to contribute to the class material.) The class invites students to explore why the site works and compare it to other social media networks. According to Motherboard, Peterson explained the importance of Reddit to MIT faculty during his efforts to create the course. "Nobody disputes that something's important if it's on the front page of the New York Times," he said. "If something is on the front page of Reddit, now it matters. It tells you something about that community and what they find important." (For more on this story, click here.)

    While classes rooted in popular culture are not new phenomena, what's your stance on the educational value of offering such courses? Do you think colleges are pandering to students' wants verses needs? Share your thoughts in the comments section. And don't forget to fund your own college education the right way – free! Create a profile on Scholarships.com today to find financial aid that's personalized to you!

    Comments

    Scholarships: It’s Not Too Late… But it’s Getting Close

    May 21, 2009

    by Kevin Ladd

    Each year at about this time, I see students, desperate for financial aid of any kind, begin to despair juuuust a bit. “This scholarship is due in two days… I can’t put together a application/winning essay that quickly!” or something along those lines.  Others complain that the deadlines have passed for many of the scholarships for which they might have applied. There is only really one solution for this and that is for you to begin searching for scholarships earlier in the year."

    Comments

    Recent Posts

    Tags

    ACT (20)
    Advanced Placement (24)
    Alumni (17)
    Applications (83)
    Athletics (17)
    Back To School (73)
    Books (66)
    Campus Life (457)
    Career (115)
    Choosing A College (53)
    College (1006)
    College Admissions (243)
    College And Society (310)
    College And The Economy (377)
    College Applications (148)
    College Benefits (290)
    College Budgets (216)
    College Classes (446)
    College Costs (494)
    College Culture (600)
    College Goals (386)
    College Grants (53)
    College In Congress (88)
    College Life (568)
    College Majors (221)
    College News (592)
    College Prep (166)
    College Savings Accounts (19)
    College Scholarships (159)
    College Search (115)
    College Students (457)
    College Tips (116)
    Community College (59)
    Community Service (40)
    Community Service Scholarships (27)
    Course Enrollment (19)
    Economy (122)
    Education (26)
    Education Study (29)
    Employment (42)
    Essay Scholarship (38)
    FAFSA (55)
    Federal Aid (99)
    Finances (70)
    Financial Aid (415)
    Financial Aid Information (58)
    Financial Aid News (57)
    Financial Tips (40)
    Food (44)
    Food/Cooking (27)
    GPA (80)
    Grades (91)
    Graduate School (56)
    Graduate Student Scholarships (20)
    Graduate Students (65)
    Graduation Rates (38)
    Grants (62)
    Health (38)
    High School (130)
    High School News (73)
    High School Student Scholarships (184)
    High School Students (310)
    Higher Education (110)
    Internships (526)
    Job Search (178)
    Just For Fun (115)
    Loan Repayment (40)
    Loans (48)
    Military (16)
    Money Management (134)
    Online College (20)
    Pell Grant (28)
    President Obama (24)
    Private Colleges (34)
    Private Loans (19)
    Roommates (100)
    SAT (23)
    Scholarship Applications (163)
    Scholarship Information (179)
    Scholarship Of The Week (271)
    Scholarship Search (219)
    Scholarship Tips (87)
    Scholarships (403)
    Sports (62)
    Sports Scholarships (21)
    Stafford Loans (24)
    Standardized Testing (46)
    State Colleges (42)
    State News (33)
    Student Debt (84)
    Student Life (512)
    Student Loans (140)
    Study Abroad (67)
    Study Skills (215)
    Teachers (94)
    Technology (111)
    Tips (508)
    Transfer Scholarship (16)
    Tuition (93)
    Undergraduate Scholarships (35)
    Undergraduate Students (154)
    Volunteer (45)
    Work And College (83)
    Work Study (20)
    Writing Scholarship (18)

    Categories

    529 Plan (2)
    Back To School (357)
    College And The Economy (516)
    College Applications (254)
    College Budgets (343)
    College Classes (566)
    College Costs (751)
    College Culture (936)
    College Grants (133)
    College In Congress (132)
    College Life (962)
    College Majors (331)
    College News (919)
    College Savings Accounts (57)
    College Search (390)
    Coverdell (1)
    FAFSA (116)
    Federal Aid (132)
    Fellowships (23)
    Financial Aid (705)
    Food/Cooking (76)
    GPA (277)
    Graduate School (107)
    Grants (72)
    High School (540)
    High School News (259)
    Housing (172)
    Internships (565)
    Just For Fun (223)
    Press Releases (1)
    Roommates (138)
    Scholarship Applications (223)
    Scholarship Of The Week (347)
    Scholarships (596)
    Sports (74)
    Standardized Testing (58)
    Student Loans (225)
    Study Abroad (61)
    Tips (837)
    Uncategorized (7)
    Virtual Intern (532)

    Archives

    < Apr May 2015 Jun >
    SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
    262728293012
    3456789
    10111213141516
    17181920212223
    24252627282930
    31123456

    << < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>
    Page 5 of 36