Skip Navigation Links

by Agnes Jasinski

The name of this week’s Scholarship of the Week, the Kor Memorial Scholarship, may suggest that applicants be familiar with Klingon, the language created for use in the “Star Trek” series. The main criteria, however, is that all undergraduates and graduates nominated for the award be interested in the field of language study, whether that’s Klingon or the more traditional Spanish, French, or general linguistics degrees.

The purpose of the Kor Memorial Scholarship is to recognize and encourage scholarship in language study, and to award creative and innovative students. Applicants must be nominated in order to be considered for the award, so if you think this award is a good fit, make sure to talk to your academic department chair or dean. Winners are chosen by the director of the Klingon Language Institute and a panel of qualified language specialists. If you’re interested in checking out more awards with unique criteria, we have a long list of unusual scholarships that reward students their interest in mule deer, duck calling, and everything in between.

Prize: $500

Eligibility: All nominees must be full-time students at the time of the award and in a program leading to a degree in a field of language study.

Deadline: June 1, 2010

Required Material: In addition to a nominating letter from a department chair or dean at the student’s school, applicants must submit a resume highlighting their education, experience, awards, and community service.  Applicants must also submit two additional letters of recommendation from departmental faculty, and a brief statement of goals related to the field of language study.

Further details about the application process can be found by conducting a free college scholarship search on Scholarships.com. Once the search is completed, students eligible for this scholarship award will find it in their search results.


Comments

by Agnes Jasinski

Several four-year colleges are already looking into offering accelerated three-year programs, either to bring more revenue into their schools or to offer an official path for students already working to complete their degrees under the traditional four years. Associate’s programs have always been an alternative for students looking for lower-cost options in specific fields and disciplines, and typically take two or more years to complete. One school, however, will launch an accelerated version of the typically two-year program, giving the students the option of receiving a degree in one year flat.

Starting this fall, Ivy Tech Community College in Indiana will offer a pilot program to students interested in completing degrees in health-care support in just one year. Students must commit to an 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. school week, five days a week, but in exchange, the cost of the program and any associated tuition and fees will be covered by the college. The fifth day in that school week will be reserved for fields trips, more experiential activities, or additional class time if certain instructors need it.

According to an article in The Chronicle of Higher Education on the program, this is the first community college in the country to offer an accelerated associate’s degree. The project was made possible by more than $2.5 million in grants from the Lumina Foundation for Education and the Indiana Commission for Higher Education, and aims to address low degree-completion and retention rates among low-income students. Only about 25 percent of students who enter associate’s degree programs graduate with that two-year degree, according to The Chronicle.

Is it really possible to squeeze all of that instruction into one year? Ivy Tech administrators say yes. The students who were welcomed into the program for the fall were determined to be “college-ready” by guidance counselors and faculty and staff at the college, based on their academic achievements in college and any relevant test scores and records. Students will be divided into cohorts of between 12 to 20 students, and will receive condensed instruction where they are expected to synthesize quite a bit of information at one time. All of the students will be receiving financial aid. In fact, they must be in need of financial aid to enter into the program, as one of the aims of the program is to improve the success rates of low-income student populations.

According to The Chronicle, a number of technology centers in Tennessee have been experimenting with accelerated certificate programs, although they do not award associate’s degrees in any fields of study. Proponents of acceleration say programs like the one at Ivy Tech are especially useful in areas with competitive job markets or high numbers of unemployment workers who need new skills; graduates are able to get back out into the workforce with new skills in less time than before. What do you think? Is one year too little time to get a degree? Should four-year colleges look to accelerate programs even further?


Comments (2)

by Agnes Jasinski

For some of you, next fall will be a fresh start on a new campus, whether you’re transferring from a community college to complete a bachelor’s degree, or whether you were unhappy at your four-year university and needed a change of scenery. You’re not alone. The transfer experience is a reality for about one-third of all students who go to college, according to a report issued this week by the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) on the transfer admissions process.

The study, which used data from the 2006 NACAC’s annual  Admission Trends Survey and pieces of a dissertation project from Michigan State University, looked at not only the number of college students who transfer schools but what transfer students can expect to be judged on when they apply to new schools, an important piece of information for students worried about how their applications will be perceived by admissions officials. Overall, about 64 percent of all transfer applicants are admitted to their intended colleges; about 69 percent of all first-time applicants are admitted.

According to the study, your academic achievements from high school become much less important than what you’ve done so far at the college you’re currently at. (Both public and private institutions overwhelmingly agreed on this point, according to the study.) College-level GPAs were ranked as the most important thing schools look at when they receive applications from potential transfer students. Grades in transferable courses are also ranked high in terms of what college officials look for. Private colleges are much more likely than public institutions to pay attention to things personal essays, recommendations and interviews. Larger, public institutions viewed the following more positively than private colleges: having 60 or more hours of transferable credit, being more than 25 years old, and planning to enroll part-time.

As far as what else admissions officials considered fairly important on a transfer applicant’s file, the results were a mixed bag:

  • Scores on standardized tests are important to 3.8 percent of public and 8.5 percent of private schools.
  • The quality of prior post-secondary institutions is important to 7.4 percent of public and 13.2 percent of private schools. (The study does not describe how “quality” is judged.)
  • A student’s ability to pay is considered by 3.4 percent of private schools. (This was a non-issue for public institutions surveyed for this study.)
  • Student interviews were considered by 11.1 percent of private schools. (This was a non-issue for public institutions surveyed for this study.)
  • Race/ethnicity was important to 2.4 percent of public and 2.6 percent of private schools.
  • Essays and writing samples were important to 6.1 percent of public and 25.5 percent of private schools.

Comments

by Agnes Jasinski

In the wake of the first lawsuits filed against the Arizona immigration law, the University of Arizona’s President Robert E. Shelton released a letter Thursday describing the effects the law has already had on the school’s admissions.

In that letter, Shelton says administrators are worried about the international community on the school system’s campuses. He goes on to say the college will do whatever they need to do to keep the “health and safety” of those international students a top priority, and will put procedures in place to allow them the “free movement” they are accustomed to on the college’s campuses. Perhaps most significantly, however, Shelton describes how the law has already hurt the college on the admissions level:

“We have already begun to feel an impact from SB1070. The families of a number of out-of-state students (to date all of them honors students) have told us that they are changing their plans and will be sending their children to universities in other states. This should sadden anyone who cares about attracting the best and brightest students to Arizona."

The new law requires all immigrants in the state to have their alien registration documents or other documents proving citizenship available at all times, and allows police to stop and question anyone in the state suspected of being in the United States illegally. The law would also crack down on illegal day laborers looking for work and those who hire them. There has been a national uproar since the law was passed, with many concerned that the law encourages racial profiling against Latinos.

College students have been particularly vocal. A story on CNN.com today describes the mood on the University of Arizona’s Tucson campus. One student there, Francisco Baires, has been circulating a petition summing up students’ concerns with the new law. He and others plan to present that petition to the school’s president next week, and will ask him to sign it himself. Another student, Jessica Mejia, organized Immigration Awareness Week on the campus, which included a series of programs and informational sessions on the intricacies of the law and acted as a place where students could share their personal immigration stories.

Students outside of Arizona have protested the measure as well. Throughout the Denver area today, hundreds of both high school and college students will stage a walk-out in protest. Administrators at the schools and police departments are all in on the walk-out. Is anything happening at your high school or college campus related to Arizona’s immigration law? What do you think about the immigration law, and what has the mood been like at your school since it was passed?


Comments (1)

So You’re a College Grad

Part I: Dealing with Post-Graduation Anxiety

May 18, 2010

by Agnes Jasinski

As graduation season begins on college campuses across the country, many of you are well-prepared and excited for this new chapter in your lives. You have jobs or internships lined up in your fields of study, or have travel plans set for the summer before you’re officially labeled “adults.” For many others, however, the months after graduation are more nerve-wracking than anything else. So we’ve come up with a series of posts this week that will hopefully ease your minds a bit, and perhaps more importantly, help you see that you’re not alone.

Before we get into ideas on what you could do with your life post-graduation if you haven’t yet nailed down a job or other plans, we think it’s important to address the anxiety many graduates feel when their college experience is coming to an end. You probably became used to the freedom you first felt as a freshman on a new campus with endless possibilities. Now, as you’re watching your senior year come to end, you’re probably faced with endless questions instead from family and friends: "Have you found a job?" "What are your plans?" "Where will you live?"

First of all, take a step back and breathe. Although the economy has yet to rebound completely, there are thousands of others in the same boat as you, and it’s fine to take some time to be indecisive about what you want to do next. Once you’ve done that, you need to prepare to confront your future and do a bit of self-reflection. Graduating from college can be overwhelming. Many college students end up in careers unrelated to their majors, or take time off after college (if such an option is financially feasible) to figure out what it is they really want to do, via travel, volunteerism, or internships in fields they may be interested in exploring further.

Speaking of finances, much of the anxiety felt by recent graduates comes from the doom and gloom that comes with budgeting once you’re out of college. You no longer have your financial aid package or the option to increase your student loan totals (a bad idea, by the way, that should only be considered as a last resort) as a cushion, although there are things you can do to ease the burden a little bit right after graduation. If you’re unemployed, defer your student loans. You don’t want to face fees and interest charges for being unable to make payments on your loans and hurt your credit score in the process. If you have any prospects for part-time work or full-time temporary work, start saving. Finding a job isn’t a science, and sometimes it does take a while to find that perfect fit.

Tomorrow we’ll talk more about what you can do in the short-term as a recent graduate, because you really do have quite a few options. Were you floundering until you came across that perfect post-graduation plan? We'd love to hear your stories!

This is the first post in a three-part series on dealing with that “What’s next?” feeling college students may get post-graduation. Return to the Scholarships.com blog tomorrow for a look at popular short-term plans for recent college graduates, especially if your upcoming summer is looking fairly open!


Comments

by Agnes Jasinski

Minority scholarships are one of the more common scholarships by type out there, with numerous organizations looking to make college more affordable for those who may have been traditionally under-served in higher education. Scholarships for Asian students are no different. In honor of May being Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, this week’s Scholarship of the Week is limited to women of Asian and Pacific Islander descent.

This week’s award comes from Central California Asian Pacific Women, a group of business and community leaders looking to support young women in their educational endeavors. Since 1981, the group has given more than $750,000 in scholarships to more than 180 of California’s Asian and Pacific Islander women. If you don't fit in to this category, try conducting a free scholarship search, and there are dozens of awards out there for not only Asian students looking to pay for college, but students from all minority groups and other demographic populations.

Prize: Scholarships vary, but the maximum amount is $1,000. Awards are given in July.

Eligibility: Applicants must be Asian and Pacific Islander women residing in Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced or Tulare Counties in California. The selection criteria include academic achievement, extracurricular activities, and financial need. Applicants may be entering, continuing undergraduate, or re-entry students in a college or university. Special awards are also available for students studying in the areas of health, business, or early childhood education.

Deadline: May 15, 2010

Required Material: Those interested in the award are asked to complete online applications that include short essays in response to three questions to communicate personal experience, academic, and/or special circumstance information. Applicants must also submit official transcripts and two letters of reference; at least one of these should be from a teacher or counselor from the last or current school that applicant attended.

Further details about the application process can be found by conducting a free college scholarship search on Scholarships.com. Once the search is completed, students eligible for this scholarship award will find it in their search results.


Comments

So You’re a College Grad

Part II: Setting Short-Term Goals

May 19, 2010

by Agnes Jasinski

You don’t have to have everything figured out right after you walk across that stage to receive your college degree. However, you do need to have the beginnings of a plan that will help you determine not only what you’d like to use that new degree for, but how you’ll be meeting more immediate needs, like finding a place to live that isn’t a campus apartment or college dorm, and paying and budgeting for all that new adult freedom you’re experiencing when you’re not yet gainfully employed.

The first step you’ll need to take is prioritizing which of those short-term goals is most pressing. That could mean focusing on getting a roof over your head. If that means sacrifice on your part and moving back in with your parents, it might not be the worst idea you’ve had. You’ll save some money and feel less anxious about finding a job to pay the bills if you’re getting some help. Don’t get too comfortable, though. A good way to make sure you’re doing your part and looking for jobs or that next step is to come up with a time-line of when you’d like to be out of your parents’ house.

If you found yourself using your student credit card too much thanks to that free T-shirt offer that came along with it, you may need to focus on making ends meet and paying down your debt. If you’re unemployed, there’s no shame in deferring any student loans you may have. At the very least, try landing a part-time or full-time temporary job if making some money is your top priority. Plenty of new graduates spend some time working at a job that perhaps isn’t all that related to their college major, so that they’re able to save up some money or start paying off debts. We’re not telling you that you should give up on that dream job. But we are saying it won’t be very useful to get into more debt while daydreaming of your future career, as you’ll only feel that much more stressed out when that perfect gig finally falls into your lap.

Finally, if it’s an option, the months after college may be a great time for you to explore alternatives to employment. A popular option is the backpacking through Europe trip. If you’ve always wanted to volunteer in the community or teach abroad, the time after college might be the last time you’re able to do that before you’re burdened by the responsibilities of a career and limited vacation time. If it’s not financially feasible, it may be wiser to save your money, but if you have the funds or will have saved some money thanks to a part-time or temporary job, there’s no harm in taking some time away from the job search to do some self-exploration and potentially figure out what you’re really interested in doing.

This is the second post in a three-part series on dealing with that “What’s next?” feeling college students may get post-graduation. Return to the Scholarships.com blog tomorrow for a look at long-term goals for recent college graduates, and how you can start figuring out where you'd like to be a few years down the road.


Comments

by Agnes Jasinski

It’s late in the semester, and you’ve got final projects and exams staring you in the face. Now seems like as good a time as any to skip class, either to get a jump on the above-mentioned workload, sleep in, or enjoy the warmer weather. Your professor won’t miss you in that big lecture hall, right?

Come fall, students at Northern Arizona University may be missed more than usual in those big college classes thanks to the installation of a new electronic system that will measure students’ attendance. According to a recent article in The Arizona Republic, the new system will effectively mark students present by scanning their ID cards as they walk in. That system, paid for by $75,000 in federal stimulus money, then produces an attendance report for the instructor of that course.

The system will affect the most popular — and populated — courses, typically taken in students’ freshman and sophomore years. This doesn’t mean the school will be introducing mandatory attendance policies; but instructors may be more likely now to consider attendance as a factor when awarding grades. (Most instructors in smaller classrooms already count attendance/participation as part of students’ final grades.) Students are unsurprisingly upset by the plan, calling it an invasion of privacy. According to The Arizona Republic, a new Facebook group in opposition to the measure has already collected more than 1,300 members. Some students suggest that if they really want to skip class, they’ll find ways around the new system, like handing their IDs to a study buddy so that their name is counted on that day’s roster.

In response to complaints that the process was a little too “Big Brother,” administrators say they’re doing this for the students’ own good and to lower the number of students who miss class. Those who frequently miss class will probably not do as well in school, thus increasing their likelihood that they’ll drop out of college altogether. Administrators point to a number of research studies that link academic achievement with attendance to help their cause. A study in 2001 from the University of Maryland-Baltimore County, for example, found that students scored higher on quizzes if they were responsible for signing in to class each session.

What do you think? Would you try to avoid classes that scanned ID cards? Is it an invasion of privacy, or just a way to make students more accountable?


Comments

So You’re a College Grad

Part III: Setting Long-Term Goals

May 20, 2010

by Agnes Jasinski

Once you’ve figured out what you should do with your life after graduation in the short-term, it’s a good idea to start thinking long-term, and determining where you’d like to see yourself a few years down the line. The first step may be getting your affairs in order. If you’re expecting a move within a year or two after college, look into how much money you’d need to save to make that happen, and what you need to know about your intended location’s housing/rental stock and job outlook.

Speaking of jobs, finding the perfect one isn’t an exact science. Deciding on a long-term gig shouldn't be taken lightly, and if you can, take the time to do your research when considering where you'd like to work. It’s hard to tell how long the process may take, but there are ways for you to improve your chances of finding a job that is a good fit for you. Use your school’s career center and alumni networks. Sometimes, it is all about who you know. The counselors at the career center may also help you retool your resume, the most important piece of your application package that you’ll be giving to potential employers. If your job search is hampered by a weak economy, or if you’ve gotten word that a job you think you qualify for and would really enjoy will open up in a few months, make the most out of your time. Look into seasonal internships related to your college degree to impress employers once jobs do open up. You’ll look like self-starter who takes initiative rather than waiting things out.

If you’re interested in a career where it would be beneficial to have an advanced degree, graduate school right after you’re done with your undergraduate degree may be an option for you. Just know that this option may not be for everyone, especially if you’re feeling burned out from your four years in college or if you’re only interested in graduate school because you’d like to put any decision-making about your future career on the back-burner. Depending on your field of study and college major, graduate school may help you tremendously, giving you openings to positions higher up in the food chain, or it may not be as beneficial, giving you an additional mound of student loan debt.

Did we miss anything? What else do you think new graduates should consider when thinking about their long-term goals?

This is the last post in a three-part series on dealing with that “What’s next?” feeling college students may get post-graduation. The Scholarships.com blog will be back to giving you the latest higher education news and tips on financial aid and college life tomorrow!


Comments

by Agnes Jasinski

May 1 is traditionally the day many students submit enrollment deposits to their intended schools and make their college choice official. For colleges will late and rolling admissions, however, now begins the time to woo students into choosing their school for fall.

Despite what you’ve heard about increased competition and limited space at the most selective institutions (and colleges in California, where the state school system is using wait lists for the first time), space is still available at a number of colleges across the country. A survey released today by the National Association for College Admission Counseling lists those public and private schools, and whether slots available for new freshman and transfer students are limited or more plentiful.  The Space Availability Survey is also probably good news for students on wait lists, as it shows there are still options for those who may be rejected from those schools they have been waiting to hear back from. The survey also lists which schools still have housing and financial aid available to incoming students, as both may be limited this late in the game.

For once, it seems, the ball is in the students’ courts. Schools that may need to reach deep into their wait lists or that may have lower enrollments overall due to high price tags that may not be as desirable in a tough economy may need to put in a little extra effort getting students interested in their campuses. A recent article in The Chronicle of Higher Education described the “sweet and subtle science” of wooing students who have yet to make their final decisions. At Lafayette College, for example, admissions officials spend much of the late spring reaching out to high school seniors and their parents with personalized follow-up letters, e-mails, phone calls, and on-campus events meant to showcase how their school is different than the rest and is more interested in building relationships with new additions to their student body.

At Menlo College, admissions officials don’t expect to have their incoming class finalized until the first week of September, according to an article yesterday in The Chronicle, with many of those late registrants coming from overseas and transfer students from across the country. Pennsylvania State University at Schuylkill is about two-thirds of the way to their enrollment goal for their new group of incoming freshmen. At the same time, recruitment officers there are contacting juniors for next year.


Comments

Recent Posts

Tags

ACT (19)
Advanced Placement (24)
Alumni (16)
Applications (76)
Athletics (17)
Back To School (72)
Books (66)
Campus Life (444)
Career (115)
Choosing A College (41)
College (918)
College Admissions (225)
College And Society (271)
College And The Economy (330)
College Applications (141)
College Benefits (282)
College Budgets (205)
College Classes (437)
College Costs (454)
College Culture (548)
College Goals (386)
College Grants (53)
College In Congress (78)
College Life (500)
College Majors (212)
College News (502)
College Prep (164)
College Savings Accounts (17)
College Scholarships (129)
College Search (109)
College Students (375)
College Tips (99)
Community College (54)
Community Service (40)
Community Service Scholarships (26)
Course Enrollment (18)
Economy (96)
Education (24)
Education Study (28)
Employment (36)
Essay Scholarship (38)
FAFSA (49)
Federal Aid (86)
Finances (68)
Financial Aid (361)
Financial Aid Information (37)
Financial Aid News (31)
Financial Tips (35)
Food (44)
Food/Cooking (27)
GPA (80)
Grades (91)
Graduate School (54)
Graduate Student Scholarships (19)
Graduate Students (63)
Graduation Rates (38)
Grants (61)
Health (38)
High School (128)
High School News (62)
High School Student Scholarships (142)
High School Students (257)
Higher Education (110)
Internships (525)
Job Search (167)
Just For Fun (96)
Loan Repayment (33)
Loans (39)
Military (16)
Money Management (134)
Online College (20)
Pell Grant (26)
President Obama (19)
Private Colleges (34)
Private Loans (19)
Roommates (99)
SAT (22)
Scholarship Applications (153)
Scholarship Information (140)
Scholarship Of The Week (226)
Scholarship Search (181)
Scholarship Tips (70)
Scholarships (360)
Sports (61)
Sports Scholarships (21)
Stafford Loans (24)
Standardized Testing (45)
State Colleges (42)
State News (33)
Student Debt (76)
Student Life (499)
Student Loans (130)
Study Abroad (66)
Study Skills (214)
Teachers (94)
Technology (111)
Tips (479)
Tuition (92)
Undergraduate Scholarships (35)
Undergraduate Students (154)
Volunteer (45)
Work And College (82)
Work Study (20)
Writing Scholarship (18)

Categories

529 Plan (1)
Back To School (351)
College And The Economy (463)
College Applications (244)
College Budgets (333)
College Classes (548)
College Costs (703)
College Culture (904)
College Grants (132)
College In Congress (123)
College Life (868)
College Majors (321)
College News (823)
College Savings Accounts (55)
College Search (382)
FAFSA (108)
Federal Aid (118)
Fellowships (23)
Financial Aid (637)
Food/Cooking (76)
GPA (277)
Graduate School (106)
Grants (71)
High School (479)
High School News (206)
Housing (172)
Internships (564)
Just For Fun (202)
Press Releases (1)
Roommates (138)
Scholarship Applications (183)
Scholarship Of The Week (301)
Scholarships (546)
Sports (73)
Standardized Testing (58)
Student Loans (220)
Study Abroad (60)
Tips (741)
Uncategorized (7)
Virtual Intern (531)

Archives

< Mar April 2014 May >
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
303112345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930123
45678910

Follow Us:

facebook twitter rss feed
<< < 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  > >>
Page 8 of 35