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by Susan Dutca

Faculty at CUNY were relatively concerned when they noticed a $500,000 donation account only had $76 left in it. It was especially suspicious after City College President Lisa Coico previously used $150,000 towards personal expenses.

The account - the Martin and Toni Sosnoff Fund for the Arts - is intended to support the humanities and arts department at the City University of New York. The donation, which is part of the holdings of CUNY's 21st Century Foundation, serves as the "school's principal fund-raising arm," and was already under investigation. In May, The Times revealed that City College's 21st Century Foundation had paid for Coico's personal expenses, including "fruit baskets, housekeeping services and rugs," when she took office in 2010. The foundation was reimbursed $150,000 from the Research Foundation of the City University of New York, which manages research funds for CUNY. A CUNY spokesperson defended Coico, claiming the "expenditures were authorized by the CCNY 21st Century foundation" but that recent hire Coico "had not known that permission was [also] required by the university."

When CUNY faculty members initially demanded an explanation for the "improperly diverted" funds, they experienced "silence, delay and deflection" before reaching out to University Chancellor James B. Milliken. According to The New York Times, Milliken's "willingness to conduct an internal investigation suggests that the finances of City College, and the leadership of Mrs. Coico, are likely to be under more scrutiny."

Faculty members are “deeply concerned about the practical, ethical and legal implications of the situation.” CUNY isn’t the only school in such a predicament - chancellors at the University of California, Berkeley and at Davis have resigned over similar expenditure controversies. Currently, it is unknown “who withdrew the money, when and for what purpose."

How should the situation be remedied if the funds are found to be improperly diverted, again? Share with us your thoughts below.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

Today, going to college could cost as much as buying a new BMW every year, according to the Wall Street Journal. With ever-increasing college costs ranging between $120,000 and $200,000 (depending on the school), some politicians' higher education reforms are simply a "massive bailout wrapped in the promise of free tuition and relief from student loans."

College unaffordability has forced students into the growing $1.3 trillion national debt issue, with the average student owing $26,700. Where's this money going? Money is going towards grandiose campus facilities such as Purdue University's $98 million Cordova Recreational Sports center, which houses a climbing wall, vortex pool, and 25-person spa. Elsewhere, funding is being spent heavily on administration, promotions, athletics, and "noninstructional student services." There's little evidence that shows additional spending enhances the value of a college degree. Even after spending "more than half a trillion dollars from 1987 to 2005," one study notes that completion rates are declining, grade inflation is increasing, students are studying less, adult numeracy/literacy rates are declining and critical thinking skills are not improving.

Demand is strong for student loan forgiveness, as well as attaining "free" college. Such million-dollar proposed bailouts have "no new accountability measures" and will only dump the costs of higher education onto taxpayers, many of whom don't have a college education. Rather than having students invest and borrow money to go to the "wrong colleges to study the wrong subjects" - which doesn't actually prepare them with the necessary skills for the workforce - universities could be "smaller, leaner and more focused on actually teaching undergraduates." Roughly 40 percent of students are not graduating college within six years and the "college for all" mantra can be overused and pushed onto students who could alternatively attend trade/vocational schools, earn two-year and three-year degrees or certifications in professions that don't necessitate college degrees.

Avoid having to take out student loans as much as you can, by applying to and earning scholarships: money that does not have to be repaid.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

Some dormitory rooms at the University of Mississippi are "worthy of interior design magazines," even on a budget. Photos of two students' room went viral, and some call the décor over-the-top and unnecessary. The majority of the decorations were bought on a budget from stores such as TJ Maxx, Marshalls, Hobby Lobby, Home Goods, Target, Home Depot, and antique stores.

Check out the room here and let us know what you think. In the meantime, if you have a knack for interior design and want to put your craft to use beyond a dorm room, check out these interior design scholarships to help pay for your college education:

  1. Irene Winifred Eno Grant

    Deadline: April 18
    Maximum Award: $5,000

  2. Vectorworks Design Scholarship

    Deadline: August 31
    Maximum Award: $10,000

  3. Ruth Clark Furniture Design Scholarship

    Deadline: March 31
    Maximum Award: $3,000

  4. Deborah Snyder Scholarship

    Deadline: May 20
    Maximum Award: $5,000

  5. NEWH Sustainable Design Competition

    Deadline: February 19
    Maximum Award: $5,000

  6. Tom Tolen Educational Scholarship

    Deadline: April 1
    Maximum Award: Varies

  7. Robert W. Thunen Memorial Scholarship

    Deadline: April 1
    Maximum Award: $5,000

  8. Joel Polsky Prize

    Deadline: April 18
    Maximum Award: $5,000

  9. CBC Spouses Visual Arts Scholarship

    Deadline: April 29
    Maximum Award: $3,000

  10. Tricia LeVangie Green/Sustainable Design Scholarship

    Deadline: March 31
    Maximum Award: $1,500

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

Toronto native of Ethiopian descent Abel Tesfaye, better known as The Weeknd, will help bring more feel for Ethiopian culture at the University of Toronto. He recently donated $50K towards a new program that will teach Ethiopian history and language. Check out these scholarships designated for students of Ethiopian and African descent:

  1. Least Developed Countries Scholarship

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: $20,000

  2. Blacks at Microsoft Scholarship

    Deadline: March 1
    Maximum Award: $20,000

  3. The MasterCard Foundation Undergraduate Scholars Program

    Deadline: January 4
    Maximum Award: Varies

  4. Angels Over Africa Mission Scholarship

    Deadline: April 8
    Maximum Award: Varies

  5. The MasterCard Foundation Graduate Scholars Program

    Deadline: February 1
    Maximum Award: Varies

  6. EADB Math, Science, Technology, & Engineering University Scholarship Program

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: Varies

  7. Kennedy-Lugar YES Program

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: Varies

  8. The Fulbright Program

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: Varies

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

J.K. Rowling plans to end the Harry Potter series with her latest "Harry Potter and the Curse Child." For the next generation of talented and creative writers, here are some literature and creative writing based scholarships to help pay for college:

  1. Helen McCloy Mystery Writers of America Scholarship

    Deadline: February 28
    Maximum Award: $500

  2. Diverse Minds Writing Challenge

    Deadline: March 11
    Maximum Award: $5,000

  3. The Kurt Brown Fellowship for Diverse Voices

    Deadline: March 11
    Maximum Award: $1,000

  4. Hope College Creative Writing Award

    Deadline: February 15
    Maximum Award: $10,000

  5. The Leo W. and Alberta V. Thomas Utz Scholarship

    Deadline: February 10
    Maximum Award: $16,000

  6. CINTAS Foundation Fellowship in Creative Writingp

    Deadline: July 1
    Maximum Award: Varies

  7. Calliope Workshop and MFA Scholarship

    Deadline: May 31
    Maximum Award: $3,000

  8. L. Ron Hubbard Writers of The Future Contest

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: $5,000

  9. GRCF Ladies Literary Club Scholarship

    Deadline: April 1
    Maximum Award: Varies

  10. New York Women in Communications Inc. Foundation Scholarship Program

    Deadline: January 31
    Maximum Award: Varies

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (1)

by Susan Dutca

The University of Wisconsin - Green Bay is offering a course to educate students on the environmental justice movement, and it's titled "Green Lives Matter." From topics of flint lead contamination to migrant farm worker pesticide exposure, the program "argues the effects of capitalism force poor and minority community to live in dangerous and unhealthy situations". If you have a passion for environmental science, engineering or food science, check out these green scholarships:

  1. Albuquerque Ecologist Open Space Scholarship

    Deadline: December 31
    Maximum Award: $500

  2. Beulah Frey Environmental Scholarship

    Deadline: March 31
    Maximum Award: $1,000

  3. Colorado Garden Show Scholarship

    Deadline: March 15
    Maximum Award: Varies

  4. Ecotrust Native American Scholarship

    Deadline: May 31
    Maximum Award: $2,250

  5. Elmhurst Garden Club Scholarship

    Deadline: May 15
    Maximum Award: Varies

  6. Alabama Environmental Health Association Scholarship

    Deadline: February 25
    Maximum Award: $1,000

  7. Freehold Soil Conservation Scholarship

    Deadline: May 13
    Maximum Award: $2,000

  8. Girls Impact the World Film Festival Green IS Award

    Deadline: March 1
    Maximum Award: $2,500

  9. National Park Service Fellowship

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: Varies

  10. RTK Scholars Program

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: $1,000

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (1)

by Susan Dutca

Native American students lag behind their peers from a young age, across almost every measure of student success. From college enrollment, to test scores and on-time graduation, they have the lowest rates of any racial subgroup. They make up a mere 1 percent of the high school and college population and tend to be overlooked when it comes to discussion about the nation's achievement gap.

American Indian and Alaska Native Students have the highest drop-out rate - at 11.3 percent, which is nearly double the national average - the lowest graduation rate, are the least likely to enroll in college, and the second least likely to graduate on time. Native American tribal communities are not only small and young but also poor, with the median household income as low as $30,000 for some tribes. Stricken by poverty, joblessness, addiction, and abuse, they are "at the heart of the worst educational outcomes in the country."

Issues in Native Americans' education go back to the post-Civil War, when the U.S. government forced Native American children into boarding schools to make them more "civilized." Despite the White House's attempts to help by transferring more control over the schools to the tribes, they are "met with skepticism" because the government has "zero credibility with them. They see [the government] as the devil." Even with the 2001 No Child Left Behind Act, "longstanding gaps" between minority students and white students dissipated while the Native students stagnated; their ACT scores reached a five-year low.

Some successful students have cited Tribal colleges as their saving grace. Rather than attending at a mainstream institution and theorizing what it means to be Native American, they can go to tribal colleges and live it. Furthermore, they are surrounded by students from other tribes and are educated on the issues pervasive in tribal communities such as economic development, justice, and health care. Many Native American students hope to return to their communities and make a difference, as well as "build tribal capacity" and leadership for education reform.

Many colleges and universities actively seek and admit Native American students to their schools, cognizant of the disparity and achievement gap. Furthermore, they are generous in their funding through Native American scholarships.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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College Costs , College Culture , College News

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by Susan Dutca

Colleges and universities across the nation are starting to engage more in discussions regarding what it means to be a man. Masculinity, just like femininity, is celebrated through these gender-specific scholarships. So man-up and check out these scholarship opportunities!:

  1. Colored Rocks Contest

    Deadline: January 4
    Maximum Award: $3,500

  2. Dr. Dan J. and Patricia S. Pickard Scholarship

    Deadline: Mary 31
    Maximum Award: $1,000

  3. Lax Scholarship Fund for Gay Men

    Deadline: February 1
    Maximum Award: $8,000

  4. The Iris-Samuel Rothman Scholarship

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: Varies

  5. The Mervyn Sluizer, Jr. Scholarship

    Deadline: May 2
    Maximum Award: $1,000

  6. The True Gentlemen Scholarship

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: $1,500

  7. USBC Chuck Hall Star of Tomorrow

    Deadline: December 1
    Maximum Award: $6,000

  8. Winston Churchill Foundation of the USA Churchill Scholarship Program

    Deadline: November 8
    Maximum Award: Varies

  9. ALA - LITA/LSSI Scholarship

    Deadline: March 1
    Maximum Award: $2,500

  10. Bernie Varnadore Scholarship Program

    Deadline: April 1
    Maximum Award: $1,250

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

President Obama gets paid $400,000 per year to serve as President of the United States of America. Many college presidents get paid more for running a school than they would for being the leader of the free world, according to a new report from the Chronicle of Higher Education. Presidents at public universities received a median salary of $431,000 in the 2015 fiscal year, with a 4.3 percent increase. Five presidents have even entered the "million-dollar club", earning as much as $1.3 million annually. While the pay might be quite generous, being a college president has quickly become a job that's very hard to keep.

High-profile resignations or firings are becoming commonplace in the world of higher education. From heated race issues to sexual assault cases, being a college or university president has become more complex than it was a decade ago, according to The Washington Post. In addition to administrative responsibilities, presidents are increasingly responsible for pleasing alumni, faculty, and students because, "at any one time, one of those groups is upset about something." The University of Houston's President Renu Khato earned the highest salary at $1.3 million in 2015. Former University of Oregon President Mark Gottfredson followed with a total compensation of $1,215,142 and an additional $940,000 severance payout after he resigned amid controversy over the school's mishandling of a sexual assault case.

College presidents are taking on different roles, and future leadership may require individuals who don't necessarily follow "typical pathways through academia" and who don't come from traditional backgrounds. Candidates may need to keep up with evolving trends in teaching, learning and technology as well as being well-versed in finances as opposed to following conventional academic careers such as scholars, professors, and researchers. Only 30 percent of sitting provosts actually want to become a college president which is daunting, considering many of current college and university presidents are expected to retire. Who will rise up to the high-pay, high-turnover challenge?

In your opinion, should college and university residents get paid such high salaries or take a pay cut? Leave us your thoughtful comments below.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (11)

by Susan Dutca

Politicians may promise free college tuition one day, but the only way to get a free college education right now is by earning sufficient scholarships and grants. For students wanting to join the cohort of America's future leaders, here are some scholarship opportunities: :

  1. Davidson Fellows Scholarship

    Deadline: February 10
    Maximum Award: $50,000

  2. Enid Hall Griswold Memorial Scholarship

    Deadline: February 15
    Maximum Award: $5,000

  3. Media Fellows Program

    Deadline: July 14
    Maximum Award: $5,000

  4. James Madison Foundation Graduate Fellowships

    Deadline: March 1
    Maximum Award: $24,000

  5. Matt Fong Asian Americans in Public Finance Scholarship

    Deadline: February 19
    Maximum Award: $2,500

  6. Lim, Ruger & Kim Scholarship

    Deadline: September 1
    Maximum Award: $2,500

  7. Ritchie-Jennings Memorial Scholarship

    Deadline: February 5
    Maximum Award: $10,000

  8. The California Federation of Republican Women's President Ronald Reagan Scholarship

    Deadline: August 15
    Maximum Award: $2,000

  9. Virginia and Frank Misselhorn Memorial Scholarship

    Deadline: July 31
    Maximum Award: 500

  10. Otto M. Stanfield Law Scholarship

    Deadline: February 15
    Maximum Award: Varies

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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