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Maximize Your College Experience Through Campus Events

Apr 4, 2013

by Katlyn Clark

Your time in college will include getting an education, making friends and enjoying your newfound freedom. Want to maximize all three of those aspects at the same time? Just take part in some of the fun campus events that colleges provide!

So why should you attend events on campus? You get to become more involved at your school and, if you’re interested, even join the host committee. I am on the Homecoming/Spring Fling Committee and I had so much fun planning and working on its activities: Just this week, we welcomed “American Idol” winner Phillip Phillips to Campbell for a concert! Campbell also has a group on campus called the Campus Activity Board which organizes the most exciting events for students to attend. They recently held a campus-wide Easter egg hunt where students looked for eggs throughout the day to win prizes. Attending campus events may even give you a leg up academically: Depending on the event, professors may reward students with extra credit for their attendance. (We call these events “luncheon learns” at Campbell.)

My philosophy is to attend as many events and activities as possible because you’re able to have fun with your friends, meet new people and sometimes obtain some free school swag. (I have so many Campbell free t-shirts just in my first year that I don’t have to worry about buying more apparel from the bookstore!) Even the time leading up to the event is fun: For the Phillip Phillips concert, many students stood in line for tickets and the camaraderie we shared as we waited is one of my favorite college memories to date. We got great seats for this sold-out event, too!

Whether you’re after a free t-shirt, extra credit, front row concert seats or a memorable experience, make sure to take advantage of all the events your campus has to offer. What events have you attended at your school?

Katlyn Clark is a freshman at Campbell University majoring in journalism and minoring in marketing. She hopes to become a broadcast journalist for entertainment or write for a magazine such as People or Seventeen. In her spare time, Katlyn loves to hang out with friends and family and watch sports; she is a Christian who is so thankful for God’s many blessings in her life. Katlyn is from Elizabeth City, North Carolina and loves Tim Tebow, Pinterest, the WWE and cats.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Classes: To Drop or To Keep?

Apr 3, 2013

by Chelsea Slaughter

The academic year is winding down – before you know it, it will be finals week and time for semester grades! – and this is a critical time to decide if you want to drop a class or stick it out to the end. If you’re on the fence about what to do, you must consider some critical points.

  • Deadlines: Check your school’s academic calendar to find out the different deadlines for withdrawing from classes. These dates will tell you the last day to withdraw and still receive a portion of tuition back, the last day to withdraw without academic penalty and the last day to withdraw passing.
  • Financial Aid: Before you drop a class, consider how many credit hours you are taking. You must be a full-time student to receive financial aid and if at any time during the semester you drop below the required amount of hours, you may have to pay that money back.
  • Grades: If you miss the right deadline to drop a class, you will receive an automatic F. If the reason you are dropping is because of your current grade, consider if there is anything you can do to bring it up. Failing a class can bring your GPA way down and if there is a way to avoid this, take it!

There are many reasons college students decide to drop classes and while some reasons are out of their hands, there are usually ways to fix the problems they may be having. Do not take the easy route without first considering the issue, weighing the consequences and seeing if there is a way to remedy the situation. Also, stay on track during the semester – keeping up with your assignments and responsibilities will prevent you from having to make this difficult decision later on.

Chelsea Slaughter is currently a junior at Jacksonville State University majoring in communications (public relations concentration) and minoring in art. She serves as a resident assistant on campus, is the treasurer in the Public Relations Organization and is an active member in W.I.S.E., NAACP and Omicron Delta Kappa Honors Leadership Society. She aims to work in the entertainment industry post-graduation and is well on her way thanks to an internship with a digital marketer to several music artists. Chelsea strives to achieve all of her goals and motivate others along the way.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Light Up...and Send a Student to College?

Apr 2, 2013

by Carly Gerber

Imagine a place where every time you bought a pack of cigarettes, you would be funding a college student’s education. In the near future, that place could be California: The California Residents College Accessibility and Affordability Act of 2014 would increase tax by $1 for every pack of 20 cigarettes and the money would be deposited into a fund for financial aid.

The California Residents College Accessibility and Affordability Act of 2014 has a projected revenue of $800 million but there is an estimated loss of $70 million of proceeds that go to existing resources. The taxes on tobacco that already exist go to programs for tobacco education and prevention, tobacco-related disease research, breast cancer screenings for uninsured women and early childhood education. (The California Residents College Accessibility and Affordability Act of 2014 would still receive $730 million from its excise on tobacco.)

The tax on tobacco that the California Residents of College Accessibility and Affordability Act of 2014 wants to initiate has to be reviewed by the Board of Equalization. The Board’s job is to estimates the impact the tax would have on other programs that already use taxation on cigarettes. Cal State Northridge senior and sociology major Debra Hendricks said she would vote for the taxation because she has lost many people to cigarette smoking and she likes the idea that the money would be used to support students who want a college education. Junior biology major Jessica Fuentes, however, isn’t sure if another cigarette tax proposal would pass but she thinks the financial aid aspect of the proposal makes the excise appealing.

Personally, I think taxing cigarette smokers again is unfair because they are always the ones getting taxed for their activity. I don’t promote smoking but smokers shouldn’t be the ones to shoulder the burden of spending more because of a societal view on cigarettes. Maybe the California tax should be on alcohol instead – the state would make more revenue that way! What’s your view about this taxation proposal on cigarettes?

Carly Gerber is majoring in journalism at Columbia College Chicago. She loves fashion and hopes to cover the topic for a Chicago-area magazine. In her free time, she focuses on her blog, loves making jewelry and spending time on Pinterest and Pose. She hopes to use this blog to guide and relate to its followers: college students like herself!

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Report: 284,000 College Graduates Held Minimum-Wage Jobs in 2012

Apr 2, 2013

by Suada Kolovic

Looking for a competitive edge when applying for that minimum-wage barista position at your local coffee shop? Turns out your newly minted bachelor’s degree might just be the edge they’re looking for.

According to the U.S. Labor Department, there were about 284,000 college graduates working minimum-wage jobs in 2012, including 37,000 with advanced degrees. Surprisingly, that’s down from 2010’s peak of 327,000 but up 70 percent from a decade earlier. And with many college graduates saddled with crippling student loan debt, it’s no wonder they’re accepting positions that are low-paying and low-skilled.

Of the 41.7 million working 2010 college graduates, about 48 percent work jobs that require less than a bachelor’s degree and 38 percent of those polled didn’t even need a high school diploma. Why the surge of low-paying jobs? Three-fifths of the jobs lost during the recession that paid middle-income wages have been replaced with the low-wage variety, according to the National Employment Law Project. (For more on this report, click here.)

To our college student readers, does this report alter your perspective on getting a college education? Why or why not?

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Are Online Classes Right for You?

Apr 1, 2013

by Mike Sheffey

Hey everyone! Thought I’d talk about online classes this week. People typically opt for online classes to free up some space in their schedules during the academic year. You can take them during the summer or simultaneously with your regular classes to knock out some credits. You can also seek out courses not typically offered at your college or university. The benefits of online courses, in my opinion, greatly outweigh the negatives...but I’ll let you readers sort it out.

Benefits

Negatives

  • Being independent, there is less of a chance of study groups and working with others.
  • Sometimes people do not take online classes with the same seriousness as regular classes when they should be treated as such.
  • There’s a lot of time spent on the computer – to those with Facebook addiction and problems focusing, it could be a challenge.
  • There is much more distance and more hoops people have to jump through to get help in these classes. That’s not an issue for more independent students but those who frequent help sessions or their professor’s office hours with questions might find it difficult.
  • Online courses are much more objective in nature. If you rely on the participation portion of grades and partial credit on tests, these courses might prove difficult.

I personally believe that if you have the chance to get ahead through online classes, you should take it. College can be tough and anything to ease your workload in the future is a plus.

Mike Sheffey is a junior at Wofford College double majoring in computer science and Spanish. He loves all things music and has recently taken up photography. Mike works for an on-campus sports broadcasting company as well as the music news blog PropertyOfZack.com. He hopes to use this blogging position to inform and assist others who are seeking the right college or those currently enrolled in college by providing advice on college life, both in general and specific to Wofford.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Building a Resume While in School

Mar 27, 2013

by Chelsea Slaughter

We all know that school is hard sometimes but life after graduation can be much harder if you do not do what’s necessary to stand apart from the crowd. When graduating high school and entering college, you will find many opportunities to enter academic and social organizations, most of which will require application processes that ask about your involvement and leadership skills. Realizing you don’t have much on your resume? No worries: You still have time.

First, find a club that interests you and join it. And don’t just be a member – run for a position, ANY position. This shows leadership and adds an extra line on your resume while showing you have ambition and drive different from students who are just members. Another good way to build a resume is through volunteer work. Spending extra time doing community service is a great way to gain experience AND give back.

When it comes to building a resume in college, the small minimum wage jobs really do not count. After graduation, companies want to see what you have done to gain hands-on skills. Most degrees require students to do at least one internship; this usually takes place during junior year but don't be afraid to get a head start in your freshman or sophomore years...or both! Also, try joining academic and community service-based organizations – this will help to encounter great opportunities that you might not find on your own.

Remember that employers look beyond just good grades: They want to be able to see that you have put yourself out in other activities and can handle multiple responsibilities. If you spend your free time wisely and productively, you will definitely thank yourself later.

Chelsea Slaughter is currently a junior at Jacksonville State University majoring in communications (public relations concentration) and minoring in art. She serves as a resident assistant on campus, is the treasurer in the Public Relations Organization and is an active member in W.I.S.E., NAACP and Omicron Delta Kappa Honors Leadership Society. She aims to work in the entertainment industry post-graduation and is well on her way thanks to an internship with a digital marketer to several music artists. Chelsea strives to achieve all of her goals and motivate others along the way.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Should Guns Be Allowed on College Campuses?

Mar 26, 2013

by Carly Gerber

Every time I learn about a school shooting, I feel less safe at my university – my paranoia has become so severe that I won’t study in the library because this location has been a target in several shootings – and I’ve often wondered what could be done to prevent incidents like this from occurring again. With the recent situation at UCF still fresh in our minds, let’s discuss: Would allowing guns on campus make a difference? Some may think so while others are very much opposed.

Some state legislatures feel that allowing students to carry concealed firearms on campus will ease the worry of students like me. They say it’s an extension of a person’s constitutional right to protect oneself, yet higher education institutions that are in states that want students to be allowed to have a handgun do not agree with their lawmakers. (Texas and Kansas, for example, are two states whose lawmakers want to allow firearms on campus, while the schools within their borders want quite the opposite.) According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, there are 20 states that ban concealed weapons on campus, five states that allow concealed weapons at higher education institutions, 24 states that allow schools to set their own policies and several other campuses are debating whether or not to allow concealed firearms.

At the end of the day, people kill people, so I don’t believe guns are the real issue. Let me know your views about guns on campus: Would you feel safer or less safe if your student body and faculty were allowed to carry handguns?

Carly Gerber is majoring in journalism at Columbia College Chicago. She loves fashion and hopes to cover the topic for a Chicago-area magazine. In her free time, she focuses on her blog, loves making jewelry and spending time on Pinterest and Pose. She hopes to use this blog to guide and relate to its followers: college students like herself!

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Is Facebook Ruining Your College Experience?

Mar 22, 2013

by Chelsea Slaughter

Recently, I read an article about whether or not Facebook was ruining the college experience. A huge benefit to going to college is having the chance to interact and socialize with people from diverse backgrounds but are students letting Facebook keep them from these advantages?

The article states that there is an increased level of “homophily” on campuses. Homophily equates to “birds of a feather flock together” – students are using Facebook to find roommates more like themselves rather than learning about someone with a different background and set of interests. It also allows people to keep so much more in touch with childhood friends and family that they cling to old ties instead of taking the risk to create new ones.

I agree that the problem isn’t mainly Facebook but the students using it! When I graduated high school, I was so excited for my new college experience that I started a group on Facebook called “Jacksonville State University Class of 2014.” At first, it was just me adding people I knew who were going but I also added my JSU recruiter; she added all of her recruits, they added people they knew and the group continued to grow. For the entire summer, I socialized with incoming freshmen about dorm placements, orientation dates and class schedules. By the time school started, I knew a VARIETY of amazing people on campus!

Facebook and other social sites are what you make them – do not allow them to keep you in the same place and hinder your chance to learn diversity and growth! Yes, it’s smart to take caution when meeting new people but don’t shy away from new experiences. Be open, get involved and don’t be afraid of getting to know someone different...WITHOUT computer screens between you!

Chelsea Slaughter is currently a junior at Jacksonville State University majoring in communications (public relations concentration) and minoring in art. She serves as a resident assistant on campus, is the treasurer in the Public Relations Organization and is an active member in W.I.S.E., NAACP and Omicron Delta Kappa Honors Leadership Society. She aims to work in the entertainment industry post-graduation and is well on her way thanks to an internship with a digital marketer to several music artists. Chelsea strives to achieve all of her goals and motivate others along the way.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Does the Perfect Roommate Exist?

How to Choose Who to Live With Next Year

Mar 21, 2013

by Katlyn Clark

College can sound very exciting with moving away from home and being on your own but who you live with can make or break your college experience.

Most colleges require freshmen to live in campus housing with roommates. Roommates can be chosen at random, via special requests or at college orientation. (Some schools, like Campbell, even have "Class of" or "Admitted Students" pages on Facebook and students can find their future roommates there.) I had a roommate selected at random and she moved out halfway through the semester but I knew this was a common situation: Sometimes students move out to room with a better friend or they change dorms because the new residence hall is closer to their classes and extracurricular activities.

How do you know if you have found the right roommate? Talk to them! Discuss what you both expect to do at college, your respective bedtimes and what you’ll bring into the dorm. If you think the match is a good one, sign a roommate contract but if you don't think your living situation is going to work, try to make a room change sooner than later. Maybe you met someone in class or on your floor who is also having roommate issues, which makes a potential swap even easier.

If I could choose the best way to find a roommate, I would go the random route again and connect with them prior to move-in day. Most people I know on campus were paired with their roommates randomly and now consider each other good friends...but that may not be the case for everyone: It all depends on what type of person you are and if you can handle living with someone else. There is a perfect roommate for everyone!

So how did you find your roommate? Did it work out, were there issues or would you have change the way you were paired?

Katlyn Clark is a freshman at Campbell University majoring in journalism and minoring in marketing. She hopes to become a broadcast journalist for entertainment or write for a magazine such as People or Seventeen. In her spare time, Katlyn loves to hang out with friends and family and watch sports; she is a Christian who is so thankful for God’s many blessings in her life. Katlyn is from Elizabeth City, North Carolina and loves Tim Tebow, Pinterest, the WWE and cats.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Realizing the Truth About a College Education

Mar 19, 2013

by Carly Gerber

During my time at college, I found myself unhappy and unfulfilled. I despised my major and I wasn’t a fan of my campus. This being my second college, I figured it must be that college itself wasn’t for me, so I decided to drop out. I took a few months to experiment with careers that didn’t require college degrees but my choice to leave school kept haunting me.

In the midst of my time away from higher education, I came across a Chicago Tribune article which detailed common misconceptions students have about college....and I realized right away that I was one of those students! Here are just a few points the Trib covered:

  • There’s a misconception that a college degree doesn’t hold any value; like any investment, however, a college degree pays off over time. A college graduate’s earnings rise faster and peak later than the earnings of someone with a high school diploma alone. A college degree is not a guarantee of success but grads do have better odds of finding, keeping and excelling at their jobs long term.
  • Another misconception is that it doesn’t matter where you attend college...yet it’s the most important decision regarding your college career! Getting in is half the battle – the other half is deciding where to attend because that could determine if you stay there and get your degree. In real estate, they say the three most important things to consider when buying a house are location, location, location. The same goes for choosing a college: If you hate the location, it’s likely you won’t enjoy your college experience.

After realizing the true importance of a college education, I knew what I had to do. Recognizing that it was the location of my school and the major I had chosen that were bothering me, I spent my time off figuring out a major I want to immerse myself in and finding a university in a location I can’t wait to live. I’ll be returning to school in the fall!

Carly Gerber is majoring in journalism at Columbia College Chicago. She loves fashion and hopes to cover the topic for a Chicago-area magazine. In her free time, she focuses on her blog, loves making jewelry and spending time on Pinterest and Pose. She hopes to use this blog to guide and relate to its followers: college students like herself!

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Calgary Student Runs Campaign on “Puppy Room” Platform...and Wins!

Mar 19, 2013

by Suada Kolovic

Running for student office can be a challenge. With the majority of students uninterested in student politics and others voting based solely on the catchiness of a slogan ("He's not popular and he's not handsome, so he has time for student council" got my vote every time!), the odds really aren’t in anyone’s favor. Unless, of course, you run your campaign on providing cuddly-wuddly, wittle puppies for all students to enjoy. I vote yes!

University of Calgary student Ben Cannon recently won the role of vice president of student life after promising voters a puppy room. Other Canadian universities have already adopted the idea, aimed at relieving students’ stress by giving them easy access to canines on campus. Debbie Bruckner of the U of C Wellness Centre said the university is already working with Cannon on the logistics of a puppy room. “It sounds kind of like a silly idea at first but it’s proven scientifically, I mean, it raises your dopamine levels in your brain, lowers your blood pressure. There’s just something about it – there’s a reason why dogs are a man’s best friend,” said Cannon.

With all the pressure and anxiety that comes with attending college, providing students with puppies only seems fair, right? Let us know what you think.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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