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12 Year-Old Genius To Be A Doctor By Age 18?

May 24, 2016

by Susan Dutca

12-year-old Tanishq Abraham has already earned three associate's degrees and has been accepted to two University of California system four-year colleges. 60 percent of college students today are twice that age before they earn a single bachelor's degree.

Tanishq Abraham started taking college courses at age 7 and has been accepted to UC Davis and received the highest honor - a Regents Scholarship - to UC Santa Cruz. He plans to become a doctor and medical researcher before he turns 18. Although professors were reluctant to let him have such a large head start, he began community college when his peers were still in second grade and received three associate's degrees from American River College in general science; math and physical science; and foreign language students. He was allowed to attend under one condition: his mother, a veterinary doctor, had to be present during class. When he wasn't asking questions, he was busy explaining general relativity and special relativity to her.

Abraham joined the IQ society Mensa at the age of 4 and was known for picking up knowledge quickly. His accomplishments have earned him a letter of recognition from President Barak Obama. His younger sister Tiara is an award-winning singer and child genius, scoring a 99 percent on the Mensa IQ test.

Being a child prodigy isn't what many people think it is, Abraham claims. "When you think of a genius, you think of a mad scientist kind of thing." When he's not studying, Abraham is the typical, video-gaming, piano playing, and choir singing kid.

Starting and even graduating college early is a possibility, especially if you have a clear idea what field of study you wish to pursue. If you're still researching different major options, check out our list of major-specific scholarships. And most importantly, apply for and earn scholarships to not only graduate more quickly, but with little to no debt!

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Highest Paying, Best Job Opportunity College Majors & Scholarships

Mar 31, 2016

by Susan Dutca

Deciding what you want to major in (and potentially spend the rest of your life doing) isn't the easiest or quickest decision to make. Everyone has a different reason for choosing their career - whether it be monetary satisfaction, job flexibility, pure passion and interest, or the ability to advance and grow. Although you can change your major while in college, it still costs money to stay in school and earn your degree.

Based on a recently published list by OnlineDegrees.com and featured in USA Today News, the majors listed below were found to get the "most bank for your buck" – that's one reason to get a degree. This is based on average annual salary, projected job growth, programs offered, and average tuition costs*. The leading majors tend to be technology and business-related, followed by those in the STEM fields.

We don't want to just stop at a list of profitable majors - we want to help make your college education more affordable, so we've compiled a list of free scholarships which you can apply to, and hopefully win to help fund your higher education. Be sure to create a profile to get a full, comprehensive list of scholarships for which you may qualify.

Psychiatry

The road to becoming a psychiatrist is long and narrow - consisting of science-heavy coursework and many years of schooling and training. But the payoff may well be worth it - the average annual salary is well above $79,000 for the majority of states and more than 59 schools offer programs in the field. The Gallagher Student Health Careers Scholarship Program awards stellar college students who are pursuing a health career with up to $7,500 per scholarship.

If you are African-American student pursuing psychiatry, or any medicine-related field, check out the CBCF General Mills Health Scholarship, which awards $2,000 for well-qualifying students who have a minimum 2.75 GPA. For related scholarships, be sure to look at psychology, science, and medical scholarships for an extensive list and details.

Entrepreneurship

If you've dreamt of being the CEO of your own business and have the capacity and willingness to manage your own business venture, you may be an entrepreneur at heart. Peter Thiel has taken initiative to support those who think out of the box and are willing to take a risk - he established a $10,000 grant to support entrepreneur endeavors. The catch? You just have to drop out of school if you win the grant. If you're not yet ready to do that, there are other scholarships that will reward your entrepreneur dreams while in school, like the Social Entrepreneur Award worth $10,000 in seed grant for students at participating Washington member institutions. You'd be surprised that roughly 477 schools offer programs in this discipline and successful independents go on to make over $120,000 a year.

Electrician

For some, working with their hands - whether it be on car engines, electrical circuits, or pipes - brings gratification and highlights skills that don't necessarily mirror traditional education. A large majority of the skills necessary to compete in the 21st-century global market requires vocational training. That is why organizations such as The Nexstar Legacy Foundation Management in Plumbing, HVAC, or Electrical offers scholarships to people who are pursuing the trades or intending to own and operate their own business. This includes electricians, who on average, make more than $55,000 annually and have access to over 468 programs. For more electrician scholarships or general vocational scholarships, click here.

Mechanical Engineering

Do you have what it takes to take an idea to the marketplace? To design a product not only for aesthetics but for functionality? You'd probably enjoy mechanical engineering. From the automotive to the aerospace, biotechnology, energy conversion, and manufacturing industry, mechanical engineers are crucial in their ability to analyze and create/design objects and systems with motion. With over 350 available programs, mechanical engineers make an average salary of over $99,000. If you're ready to get into gear and study mechanical engineering, check out the SSPI Scholarship program or the Nexstar Legacy Foundation Management in Plumbing, HVAC or Electrical Scholarships.

Accounting, Finance, & Math

Even though your classmates may have preferred classes like gym, art, English or humanities, you may not mind formulas, equations, and calculators. In fact, you may very well think best in numbers. For math whizzes, not only are there bountiful job opportunities, but salaries can climb up into the six digits (even non-math geniuses know that's a lot). Organizations like AFWA seek to award students who are pursuing an accounting or finance degree. Though the two disciplines are separate entities, they often share similar job positions and skill sets that are math-based.

Exclusively for accounting majors who plan on becoming CPAs is the AICPA Accountemps Student Scholarship - worth up to $10,000. If you're a graduate student in finance and plan on working in local or state government finance, you may qualify for the Government Finance Professional Development Scholarship. And there are of course scholarships for minority undergraduates who have that same endeavor to work in state and local government finance, through the Minorities in Government Finance Scholarship. If you love math in general and haven't decided a set career path, check out the Exxonmobil Bernard Harris Math and Science Scholarships or the Women in Engineering and Design Book Scholarship.

Education

One of the most honorable, and demanding jobs to have is that of an educator, as they are responsible for cultivating, nourishing, and educating the minds of our society's youth. There are however, certain disciplines in teaching that get paid more than others, and those are in biology, social science, and science. If you attend a Christian college and are planning to study primary or secondary education, you may qualify for the Herman and Katherine Peters Foundation Scholarship. Teachers have certain benefits as well, such as for retirement, medical/dental care, etc., and there are also grants like the Illinois Special Education Teacher Tuition Waiver Program for those pursuing a career in special education, that exempts students from paying tuition and mandatory fees for up to four years. There are other scholarships reserved for minority students such as the Leon Bradley Scholarship Program. For a complete list of education scholarships and grants, click here.

Radiologic Sciences

Some things are just too difficult to see with the naked eye, so technology allows us to have a better view from a different perspective using medical imaging techniques, such as x-rays, CT, MRI, PET, and ultrasound. Radiologists are specialized in analyzing and interpreting medical injuries through these images, as well as knowing radiation safety and protection. The average annual salary in radiologic technologies is approximately $84,700 with over 346 programs offered. The Carle Auxiliary Scholarship awards students who are pursuing radiologic sciences or other health-care disciplines. For other health-care scholarships, visit here.

Economics

There's more to economics than math. People in economics-related fields study how people use their resources - from land to labor, investments, taxes, production, government spending, etc. They seek to understand and measure how these affect well-being. There are various specializations in economics but in general, the average salary for economists is $93,088. The NSHSS Business, Economics, & Public Policy Scholarship awards outstanding students looking to positively impact the 21st-century global economy. If you already have a BA in economics and are seeking a Master's degree - and also at least 50 percent Asian - you may qualify for the Hsiao Memorial Economics Scholarship. For more economics scholarships, check out this list.

(Geo)environmental Science & Engineering

While majors such as business and technology have remained in the top ranks for the best potential return on college investments, geotechnical engineering is one of the up and coming fields. It is a branch of engineering that focuses on geologic and geosynthetic materials for issues related to human health and the environment. The average salary is $108,433, but is not offered at many colleges. If you want to apply for scholarships based on this interest, check out scholarships that require study in civil engineering, and environmental science or engineering. Also, check out the AREMA Committee 5 - Track Scholarship or the Nexstar Legacy Foundation Technicians in Plumbing, HVAC, or Electrical Scholarships.

Political Science

Our social landscape - our schools, communities, and workplaces - as well as economic structure (and much of everything we deal with daily) is affected by politics. You don't have to be a senator or the President with a political science major. People who wish to make a difference in their communities through the political system - whether through being an urban policy planner or lobbyist - seek degrees in political science, and are compensated fairly well (an average of $98,000/year). Scholarships for political science majors tend to include other disciplines such as history, government, or economics, like the Enid Hall Griswold Memorial Scholarship and the Aziz Jamaluddin Scholarship. For a full list of political science scholarships, visit here.

Information Systems

Just like geoenvironmental science, information systems is a major that has recently gained much popularity and demand. Along with business majors, it ranks one of the most profitable majors. In fact, the U.S. Department of Commerce claims that the most highly sought out graduates are those who have both business and computing skills - after all, Information Systems is a business degree with the application of information technology (IT). To support women in the field, the Kris Paper Legacy Scholarship for Women in Technology provides financial aid to a graduating female high school senior or returning female college student who is pursuing study in a tech-related field. Or if you are a current undergraduate student with an IS major, you may qualify for the CITE Current Student Tuition Scholarship. For more information systems scholarships, visit our technology scholarships.

Business

Business majors, whether in commerce, administration, or management, have ranked amongst the top best-paying majors for quite some time, and still remain in high standing. Business degrees can be applied to virtually any industry, so to view business scholarships based on specific industries, check out our full list here. Reported average salaries are around $102,000 a year and are offered at more than 1,000 schools. Whether you are a female, someone with dependent children, a minority student, or a current college student, you have many scholarship opportunities from which to choose. Make it your first order of business to check out these scholarships and apply.

*Note: Average annual salaries and the number of schools that offer degree programs were computed by the National Center for Education Statistics and Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Pell Grants for Prisoners? Obama Says Yes

Jan 28, 2016

by Susan Dutca

According to President Obama, the Pell Grant Program should be extended to include convicted felons currently in our prison systems so that they may continue their education from behind bars. The US is a "nation of second chances," according to Arne Duncan, the current Secretary of Education, and should offer the incarcerated the option of an at least partially funded post-secondary education. Additionally, the Obama Administration hopes to extend the program through the summer so that students can graduate more quickly, while also providing incentive for students who take a minimum of 15 credits per semester/trimester.

Currently, those incarcerated at a federal or state penal institution are not permitted to receive a Pell grant - Obama's "Second Chance Pell Pilot Program for Incarcerated Individuals" would change that. Additionally, the Department of Education announced two more proposals to the current Pell Grant program which would increase the $29 billion program by $2 billion in the upcoming fiscal year. The proposal will be part of President Obama's budget proposal next month. The "Pell for Accelerated Completion" program allows students with financial need to take summer courses using Pell grant money, unlike the current program, which only covers two academic semesters.

The second proposal, the "On Track Pell Bonus," rewards students who take minimum of 15 credits per semester with $300. Roughly 2.3 million students would benefit from the bonus program. The goal of these two proposals is two-fold: to help students graduate earlier and to provide them with more financial assistance through the Pell Grant. Almost 8.3 million students were awarded the Pell Grant in the 2015 fiscal year, with approximately $28.7 billion in financial aid. According to the Department of Education's budget report, the maximum Pell grant for 2015-2016 was $5,775 but will be reduced to $4,860 next year.

According to the Department of Education, these changes would benefit almost 700,000 students with an additional $1,900 per student (currently, the average amount received by qualifying students is $3,600). Research also shows that 1.5 million high school graduates did not complete a FAFSA in 2014, despite their eligibility, resulting in just under $3B in unclaimed funds. Since today marks National Student Debt day, a group of young activists named the Young Invisibles will convene at the University of the District of Colombia Community College to learn more about the current student debt crisis and find out how they can influence higher education policy. Members of Congress will be present, including keynote speaker, Senator Elizabeth Warren.

Do you think Pell grants should be offered to incarcerated individuals? Would you take more summer courses if the Pell were to be extended? Start a discussion below.

Credit attributed to Jennifer C. Kerr, Associated Press reporter covering education from Washington, D.C.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Craft Beer 101: Universities Offer Microbrewery Education

Jan 21, 2016

by Susan Dutca

The history of beer dates back as far as the 5th century BC and is known to be one of the oldest beverages produced by mankind. However, MillerCoors might not cut it these days for beer aficionados due to the latest cultural trend: microbreweries and craft beer. From your local bar, to the stadium, and now in the classroom, the craft beer industry is starting to dominate its field with universities now offering programs that educate students on the hottest hops and beers to help them launch their careers in the craft beer industry, according to Lisa Rathke of the Associated Press.

Craft beer, as defined by the Brewer's Association, focuses on small-batch, independent, and traditional methods of brewing. The craft industry poses a threat to Big Beer, which fell 2% in 2014. According to industry statistics, craft beer now accounts for a 19% or more of dollar sales. What exactly accounts for this popularity? Some experts point to the "trendy hipsterism" - the "local vibe' that Big Beer just can't match. Brewer Association Director Paul Gatza attributes the increased marvel to beer drinkers' experimentation to brewery experimentation, increased appearance on retail shelves, the social aspect, and its portability. So why not keep up with the trend by becoming more educated and involved in the ever-growing industry?

But there's a catch: you must be at least 21 years of age. Oregon, Vermont, and California all have a minimum drinking age of 21 years and in so far as applying for the programs, students must wait till the legal age to begin their courses. Though the programs are intended to educate and place people in a up-and-coming field, the age at which people may apply may have them delaying their careers and plans until they have reached the age of drinking maturity. The average age for college freshman is 18 years old, while several may be 17 or 19 years old. That said, those intending to enroll in craft beer business courses must wait three to four years before applying and starting. Do you think the age requirement should be lowered?

Ranking at the top in the nation for the most breweries per capita, the University of Vermont offers an online business of craft beer certificate program and optional apprenticeship. According to program director Gregory Dunkling, students apply from all across the nation. Most beer-focused breweries started out five to ten years ago. Industry statistics reveal that in 2014, overall beer sales were up only 0.5% while craft beer sales increased by 17.6%. The U.S. far surpassed 4,000 breweries in September of 2015, and it had not crossed this barrier since 1873. A decade ago, Dunkling claims that home brewers, despite their strong home recipes, lacked "business acumen" - so they hired marketing, sales, and business operation staff. With increased competition in the industry, there's a demand for higher brewer knowledge, especially on the business side. UV's online class offers two separate courses: the Fundamentals of Craft Beer, and then a choice for focus on Digital Marketing, Sales, or Business Operations.

In 2013, Portland State University in Oregon began their online Business of Craft Brewing program and within a week, the class had filled all its seats. Found to be one of the "most successful professional certificate programs," it attracted international students who either "didn't want to necessarily go to college," or had already received a degree - they genuinely wanted to learn how to open their own brew pub, which required a bit more knowledgeable in marketing. Portland State University even offers a scholarship opportunity in craft brewing, titled Pink Boots Scholarship for a woman who earns income from the beer industry.

Also, San Diego State University's College of Extended Studies offers a similar professional certificate in the business of craft beer - from introductory courses such as "Exploring Craft Beer" to "Finance," students can venture into the field at local breweries, to get a hands-on learning experience in the craft beer industry. Students can receive their certificate in less than 1.5 years.

If you have a taste for microbrewery, viticulture, or any related fields of study, search for scholarships today and pursue your higher education dreams with the help of free college money.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Student Nurses Seek to Swap Dummies for Human Patients

Dec 31, 2015

by Susan Dutca

Student nurses at University of Delaware are seeking to exchange dummy patients for human ones, as they are more likely to provide a realistic scenario, especially when it comes to patient's expressing discomfort and pain. Student nurses believe that when it comes to real-life scenarios, new technology and practice on human dummies will hone communication and treatment skills. Would you volunteer to be a test dummy?

New technologies created by UD students and faculty will allow students to "practice suctioning airways on actors, who respond by gagging if they go too deep." At some point, students will also be able to draw blood from a "realistic-looking sleeve" or "simulate a urinary catheterization on sculpted genitalia worn by real people." Next June, SimUTrach will debut the first piece of equipment, helping students practice patient care with tracheostomy tubes for assisted breathing. Other patented technologies including an overlay chest compressor and a device that mimics a collapsed lung, according to USA Today news.

To best prepare student nurses, organizers are coordinating UD's Simulation Lab with the university's Healthcare Theatre program, where undergraduate theater students and adults will act out the role of a patient "struggling with many physical and mental conditions, including depression and alcohol withdrawal." Pre-med nursing, physical therapy, and nutrition students will need to respond appropriately to these "dummies" with proper "therapeutic communication that respects patient dignity." The silicone-overlay worn by the human dummies "resembles a rib cage and throat with a plastic tube emerging from the neck." There are various lung sounds such as wheezing and fine crackles. The UD team spent much time developing their prototype and is currently on their sixth one, after much updating from engineering, marketing, and fashion merchandising student designs. Even the mucus development is realistic in its color and consistency, with removable parts to keep the device from growing mold. When students are not properly handling the trach, the human dummies are prompted to cough or choke violently, as this is a common incident experienced in the real world if and when nurses accidentally hit the tracheal bifurcation.

Prospective nurses spend about 10 hours a semester working with live actors. Some more complicated procedures require manikins "equipped with breath sounds, heat tones, and palpable pulses." The monitors that measure vital signs can cost $90,000 each. A SimUTrach device costs less than $10,000. Amy Cowperthwait, who coordinates the UD Simulation Lab and university Healthcare Theatre program believes the transition to SimUTrach's technology will replace the current manikins.

If you are an aspiring practitioner, nurse, or doctor, would you want to test out these new technologies?

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Missouri Chancellor’s Ouster Plotted by Deans?

Student Protests May Not Have Caused Mizzou Resignation After All

Dec 29, 2015

by Kevin Ladd

Were student protests really even behind the ouster or was Mr Loftin's resignation a product of a coup orchestrated by nine deans who wanted him gone? According to The Chronicle of Higher Education, the deans involved had been having second thoughts about the appointment since Mr. Loftin arrived and his ouster was due to myriad occasions wherein he would refer to them as "essential middle management" and allude to his power to "fire" them.

Thomas L. Payne, who is vice chancellor and dean of the College of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources, expressed feelings that Mr. Loftin often used inappropriate methods and measures. Mr Payne reportedly recalled saying to Loftin, "I feel I must tell you that I don't think your leadership of this university is appropriate. I don't think your approach, in many cases of fear and intimidation, is the way we operate in the Midwest or anywhere. I think you should resign."

Mr. Loftin was deemed "irrevocably broken" after a dean had been forced out in December. Dean Patrick Delafontaine had served at the School of Medicine for less than a year and though the chancellor claimed Delafontaine left at his own will, the dean's colleagues didn't quite buy that. Delafontaine was known for doing a "good job" at the school and "to see his efforts dismissed and undermined...let [the deans] to conclude that [their] relationship with the chancellor was irrevocable broken."

Meanwhile, as all of this was brewing and perhaps even conveniently for the deans, student relations began to be a major issue at the school, coming to a boiling point in October and continuing to escalate, culminating in a hunger strike and members of the football team threatening to boycott all athletics unless the president stepped down. Though Loftin had befriended the student protestors by bringing them food to their demonstrations and "holding court" on the quad, his resignation had already been underway at that point.

While certainly the school must have been concerned about all of the issues students raised, it certainly does appear there was much more happening below the surface of the widely reported scandal. Do you think Mr. Loftin would have been forced out had the students not spoken up and demanded action? Leave us your insightful comments in the box below.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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How to Not Lose It with Group Projects

Oct 5, 2015

by Erica Lewis

Oh, yes, group projects. When it comes to group projects, you either love 'em or hate 'em. There's really no in-between. So how do you keep your cool when you can't stand your partners or the project itself?

  • Divide the work evenly. Don't let one person do all the work and then have the other names attached to the project. Although the load may be carried more heavily by one person, it's important to make sure that everyone plays an important role and is kept up to date. This is crucial if you're doing a group presentation and not simply submitting the project.
  • Make use of in-class work time. Many professors will give groups time in class to work on their projects. There may not be enough time to accomplish everything during this period, but it can help everyone figure out their individual tasks so you don’t have to do more work than necessary. It's also a great time to ask questions if you are unsure about any instructions or requirements.
  • Set deadlines even if they aren't assigned. The project isn't due until the end of the semester, so you can put it off, right? Wrong. However tempting it may be to procrastinate, it is better to set deadlines for your group even if the professor hasn’t assigned them. Schedule a meeting with all the group members and hold everyone accountable for their job. It just makes things easier in the long run.
  • Group projects don't have to be a daunting task, and neither does paying for school. Make sure to keep checking out your scholarship opportunities.

    Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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10 Scholarships to Start the School Year Off Right

Sep 1, 2015

by Susan Dutca

With summer quickly coming to an end, Scholarships.com is keeping you well-equipped with the top ten, hottest scholarships to bring in the new school year. What better way to enjoy the last weeks of summer than to win free college money? With scholarships available for all ages and across a variety of subjects, we've compiled top dollar scholarship opportunities for you - all you have to do is apply! Explore some of our back to school scholarships below:

Beat the Odds Scholarship

Deadline: September 14, 2015
Available to: Oregon public high school senior
Maximum Award: $2,500

Are you an Oregon public high school student who has succeeded academically despite hardships? Do you plan to continue your education by enrolling in a two or four-year college program? If education has made a difference in your life, Stand for Children Leadership Center wants to hear from you! Sponsored by Stand for Children Oregon, Beat the Odds Scholarships Award & Fundraising awards three $2,500 renewable scholarships for up to four years provided the recipient maintains a 3.0 GPA or better, remains a full time student, and funding is available.

Recipients agree to share their story at the Beat the Odds award events and participate in all related publicity, including the creation of a short, inspirational video about their lives and accomplishments.

For more information and to apply, please visit Beat the Odds Scholarship.

U.S. Bank Financial Genius Scholarship

Deadline: September 17, 2015
Available to: High school seniors through undergraduate college students
Maximum Award: $5,000

U.S. Bank knows paying for college can be challenging, especially with the cost of college tuition increasing and student financial aid resources decreasing. Navigating financial concepts can be tough, but the Financial Genius online financial education courses are available to provide you with every tool possible to build financial success. In addition to a chance to win one of five $1,000 scholarships, you have an opportunity to win a $5,000 scholarship by completing the eight education modules in our U.S. Bank Financial Genius online financial education program.

To be eligible for the Financial Genius Scholarship, in addition to the entry criteria, entrants must also complete all eight Financial Genius education modules.

For more information and to apply, please visit U.S. Bank Financial Genius Scholarships.

Chick Evans Caddie Scholarship

Deadline: September 30, 2015
Available to: High school freshmen through Graduate students, Home-schooled students
Maximum Award: Covers full tuition and housing

The Chick Evans Caddie Scholarship is a full tuition and housing college scholarship for golf caddies that is renewable for up to four years. Each year, more than 800 deserving caddies across the country attend college on a four-year scholarship from the Evans Scholars Foundation. Selected applicants must have a strong caddie record, excellent grades, outstanding character and demonstrated financial need.

For more information and to apply, please visit Chick Evans Caddie Scholarship.

Don't Text and Drive Scholarship

Deadline: September 30, 2015
Available to: High school freshmen through Graduate students, Home-schooled students
Maximum Award: $1,000

According to the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, texting while driving makes drivers 23 times more likely to get into a "safety-critical event." The purpose of this scholarship is to help you understand the risks of texting while driving.

High school through college graduates are eligible to apply. Home schooled students are also eligible. There is no age limit. You must also be a U.S. citizen or legal resident. An application and brief, 140-character response about texting while driving is required. The top 10 applications will be selected as finalists. The finalists will be asked to write a full length 500-1,000 word essay.

For more information and to apply, please visit Don’t Text and Drive Scholarship.

The "Tell a Friend Scholarship" Sweepstakes

Deadline: Available every three months - September 30, 2015
Available to: All Scholarship.com members
Maximum Award: $1,000

As a Scholarships.com member, you have free access to a customized scholarship search, detailed financial aid information, an organized college search, standardized test study guides and more. So if you like what you see, simply spread the word about Scholarships.com to your friends through our "Tell A Friend" Scholarship and you will have a chance to win money for college - $1,000 for you and $500 for one of your friends. Just enter your email and password on our website to obtain a personalized referral link. Then take that link and blog it, tweet it, email it, or Facebook it and for every one of your friends who creates a profile on our site by clicking your link, you will be entered to win a $1,000 award. There's no limit as to how many people you can send your link to and if you win, one of your friends will be chosen at random to win $500.

For more information and to apply, please visit The "Tell a Friend Scholarship" Sweepstakes.

$1,000 College JumpStart Scholarship

Deadline: October 17, 2015
Available to: High sophomores through college seniors, Non-traditional students
Maximum Award: $1,000

The College JumpStart Scholarship is an annual, merit-based competition that recognizes students who are committed to using education to better their life and that of their family and/or community.

Applicants must be 10th-12th graders, college students and non-traditional students. The main requirement is that you are committed to going to school and can express your goals for getting a higher education. Applicants must write a 250 word personal statement that answers one of four questions, which will be judged based on content and not writing style.

For more information and to apply, please visit $1,000 College JumpStart Scholarship.

Coca-Cola Scholars Program Scholarship

Deadline: October 31, 2015
Available to: High school and home-schooled seniors
Maximum Award: $20,000 Coca-Cola Scholars Program Scholarship

The Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation supports more than 1,400 college students each year, with annual scholarships of $3.4 million through two nationally recognized programs on behalf of the Coca-Cola System. Scholarship recipients excel academically and in service to others. Most Coca-Cola Scholars share a passion for social justice and many have overcome tremendous challenges to pursue their dreams.

To enter, you must be a current high school or home-schooled) senior attending school in the United States and anticipating completion of your high school diploma at the time of application. Applicants must be planning to pursue a degree at an accredited U.S. post-secondary institution and carry a minimum 3.00 GPA at the end of their junior year of high school. No essays or additional materials are required.

For more information and to apply, please visit Coca-Cola Scholars Program Scholarship.

Megan Meier Memorial Scholarship

Deadline: November 6, 2015
Available to: High school seniors
Maximum Award: $1,000

The Megan Meier Foundation is seeking high school seniors that have made a positive impact regarding issues of bullying and cyberbullying in their own school and community. The hope is to honor students that, like the Foundation, aim to promote awareness, education and positive change in response to the issues surrounding bullying and cyberbullying.

Applicants must be currently enrolled as a full time student, possess senior status, and maintain a minimum cumulative 2.5 GPA. To enter, you must write a 1-2 page essay describing how your accomplishments relate to the mission of the Megan Meier Foundation and how you have proactively helped to lessen all forms of bullying within your school community.

For further information and to apply, please visit Megan Meier Memorial Scholarship.

Resolve to Evolve Scholarship

Deadline: December 1, 2015
Available to: Scholarships.com members
Maximum Award: $2,000

The Resolve to Evolve Scholarship is about more than just making resolutions - it's about creating change and furthering our evolution as individuals and a society. We must resolve to proactively and progressively confront challenges, however daunting. The "R2E" essay scholarship is an opportunity to move beyond finger-pointing and offer constructive criticism and workable solutions for problems facing an administration or an organization.

To enter, you must write an essay of no more than 5,000 words addressing one of two questions, as well as writing a 1,200 character response that addresses why attending college is important. Applicants must be between the ages 13 and 19. The applicant who submits the overall best essay will receive a $2,000 scholarship. One (1) winner will also be selected from each grade level (freshman, sophomore, junior, senior) and will receive a $1,000 scholarship each.

All applicants must be registered members of Scholarships.com in order to qualify. If you have not already registered, please go to the Scholarships.com home page and register now.

For further information and to apply, please visit Resolve to Evolve Scholarship.

The Paradigm Challenge

Deadline: May 1, 2016
Available to: Ages 7-18
Maximum Award: $100,000

The Paradigm Challenge is an annual competition that inspires youth innovation to address important social issues. The first annual Challenge aims to generate new ideas to prevent injuries and fatalities from home fires – America's #1 disaster threat. All ideas are welcome, including posters, videos, inventions, messages, community events, websites, mobile apps, or anything else that will help save lives.

For more information and to apply, please visit The Paradigm Challenge.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (14)

Scholarships to Commemorate Slain Virginia Journalists

Aug 27, 2015

by Susan Dutca

In the midst of Wednesday's tragic shooting and killing of WDBJ7 journalist Alison Parker and cameraman Adam Ward by alleged gunman and former WDBJ-TV reporter Vester Lee Flanagan, Parker's alma mater, James Madison University is accepting donations for the Alison Parker Memorial Scholarship. Similarly, Patrick Henry Community College, where Parker received her associate's degree, is accepting donations for their Alison Bailey Parker Memorial Scholarship. There is an identical scholarship being created for Ward, who graduated from Virginia Tech in 2011.

The two young journalists were shot and killed on-air early Wednesday morning as Flanagan recorded the shooting from a gunman POV and posted it to Twitter and Facebook before being chased by police on Interstate 66. Flanagan had crashed the vehicle and suffered from self-inflicted wounds. He later died at a nearby hospital. Flanagan had faxed a 23-page manifesto/suicide note to ABC News, detailing his plans to respond to the racism of the Charleston church shooting. He also cited his own grievances; he claims being attacked by black men and white females, being discriminated against for being a gay, black man, suffering racial and sexual harassment and being bullied at work. A former reporter at WDBJ7, it was reported that Flanagan posed a hostile threat and disturbance to co-workers. This according to internal memos from WDBJ7 news Chief Dan Dennison, who cited Flanagan's "aggressive" behavior towards colleagues. Consequently, Flanagan was fired and it was recommended he seek medical attention. In his manifesto, the gunman had referred to himself as a "human powder keg" that was "waiting to go BOOM!"

Following the tragedy, scholarships are being created to memorialize the two WDBJ7 journalists by their respective schools. Those who wish to inquire about and/or support these scholarships may do so by contacting the schools directly:

James Madison University
JMU Advancement Gifts and Records
ATTN: Alison Parker Memorial Scholarship
MSC 3603
Harrisonburg, VA 22807.

Patrick Henry Community College
Patrick Henry Community College Foundation
645 Patriot Ave.
Martinsville, VA 24112

Hopefully, these scholarships will not only provide opportunity for future students of these institutions, but also preserve the memory of those who were so brutally and senselessly slain.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (14)

Duke Freshmen Reject Tragicomic, Calling it "Pornographic"

Aug 25, 2015

by Susan Dutca

Students are notorious for avoiding summer reading lists – whether they'd rather spend time outdoors or simply find the list dull, many walk into the first day of class without having read the book title. However, incoming freshmen at Duke University are boycotting and refusing to read Alison Bechdel's family tragicomic Fun Home - they claim that the "pornographic" graphic novel conflicts with their Christian morals.

Bechdel's memoir recounts her traumatic childhood with a closeted and occasionally-abusive father, as well as her own coming out of the closet experience. A strong portion of the novel has sexual themes and nudity, which allegedly discomforted some Duke freshmen. In particular, Brian Grasso had posted in the Class of 2019 Facebook page that he refused to read the novel "because of the graphic visual depictions of sexuality," and further added, "I feel as if I would have to compromise my personal Christian moral beliefs to read it." Grasso was not the only student disturbed by the novel – freshman Jeffrey Wubbenhorst added, "the nature of 'Fun Home' means that content that I might have consented to read in print now violates my conscience due to its pornographic nature." Other students objected claiming it allows "you to open your mind to a new perspective and examine a way of life and thinking with which you are unfamiliar."

Many liberal arts colleges and universities include the 2006 novel in their curriculum, as scholars and professors believe it 'is a unique and moving book that transcends genres and explores issues that students are likely to confront." This was the educational goal for Duke University's Common Experience Summer Reading Program. Although Fun Home has won five Tony awards and was turned into a Tony-winning Broadway musical, has sold over a quarter-million copies and was lauded by Time Magazine as the best book of 2006, college students are still encouraged to voice their own opinions. So are the students really overreacting when they refuse to read a book that goes against their beliefs? Or should all students be forced to read a book that, although may make them uncomfortable, can give insight to a different wave of thinking and life?

Do you have what it takes to write the next highly-controversial novel? If you have a passion for literature or creative writing, there are many scholarships out there that honor writing talent, so explore the scholarship options to see how you can fund your college education by conducting a quick and easy free scholarship search today.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (26)

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