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Meet Scholarships.com’s Virtual Interns: Darci Miller

April 29, 2011

Meet Scholarships.com’s Virtual Interns: Darci Miller

by Darci Miller

Hey there! My name’s Darci and I’m one of Scholarships.com’s new virtual interns!

I’m a native New Yorker about to finish my sophomore year at the University of Miami, aka “The U.” Yes, there’s a great party scene, warm weather almost all year round and the beach.

But that’s not why I’m here! Actually, I don’t party much at all, I’m pale, think the hot and humid weather is brutal, and have yet to hit the beach. Crazy, right? I came to UM because it’s a top 50 school (and on its way up in the rankings), has awesome programs in the areas I’m interested in, is located near a great city with lots of opportunities and offered me great financial aid. What can I say? Breaking stereotypes is fun!

I’m double majoring in journalism and sport administration. I’ve always loved to write and the Olympics are my passion (let’s not talk about my chief rooting interest, the Mets), so my majors are a really cool way to combine the two. I write for UM’s newspaper, The Miami Hurricane; I’m currently the assistant sports editor but will be leaving the sports desk next semester to be the opinion section editor. I also work at the campus’s wellness center and volunteer for the athletic department from time to time.

In my spare time – wait, spare time? What’s that? I’ve never heard of that concept before! Well, if this “spare time” you speak of actually existed, I’d spend it listening to Bon Jovi, watching "Castle," reading Harry Potter, baking and drawing.

I’m really excited to share my knowledge and experiences with the readers of Scholarships.com. Not only will it be a great learning experience for me, I hope I can be informative/helpful/entertaining/all of the above to other people.

I think this’ll be a fun ride! Join me, won’t you?

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MythBusters: The College Edition

May 24, 2011

MythBusters: The College Edition

by Darci Miller

Have you ever watched “MythBusters,” the show that scientifically tests myths and urban legends, like are elephants really afraid of mice or is it possible to walk on water? Now, I may not have a crash test dummy named Buster, but I do have two years of dorm life, on- and off-campus adventures and brutal assignments under my belt. Therefore, I bring to you "MythBusters: The College Edition."

Myth 1 – College is a constant party. Thirsty Thursday is a very real phenomenon. There are people that go out partying on Mondays. Some students come to class still drunk from the night before. But if you venture into the library on Friday evening, there are people there. College is hard work, it’s not all “Animal House.”

Myth 2 – Dorm life is disgusting. Yes, the toilets and sinks may clog occasionally and your roommate could be a vile person who steals your food and leaves garbage on your bed. But if everyone’s respectful, bathrooms are honestly fine and you may end up loving your freshman roommate and living together for multiple years...like me and mine!

Myth 3 – Professors don’t care. High school teachers beat this one into your brain, right? College professors may not remind you about daily readings but they will let you know when a test or big assignment is coming up and are happy to answer questions about them.

Myth 4 – You’ll gain weight. Eat normal-sized portions, throw in a vegetable here and there and hit the gym. This very simple recipe will ensure the Freshman 15 doesn’t even cross your mind...or waistline.

Myth 5 – You’re going to change your major numerous times. It’s fine if you do but if you know what you want to study and still love it after taking a few classes, you probably won’t. Don’t feel weird about not changing your major: Some people are just focused...you’re lucky if you’re one of them!

Darci Miller is a New Yorker studying journalism and sport administration at the University of Miami. When she’s not writing for the school newspaper, you can find her at the gym, either working or working out. She loves all ‘80s pop culture (the cheesier the better!), and glues herself to her TV when the Olympics are on. She dreams big, and believes the sky’s the limit!

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Do AP Classes Really Prepare You for College?

June 20, 2011

Do AP Classes Really Prepare You for College?

by Darci Miller

I was ambitious in high school, taking nine Advanced Placement classes in three years (five during my senior year). And if I heard it from one teacher, I heard it from them all: “This is what college is like! So get used to this amount and caliber of work!”

In my APs, I never had a free second. I was always doing homework and had to cut back on other activities because I was always drowning in my studies for one class or another. My parents would tell me it was good preparation and that it’d make college seem easy. My response? “There’s no way it could be harder!”

And guess what? It’s not. Yes, there’s a lot of work (depending on the class), tests can be hard and require a lot of studying and honors classes require more of you than regular classes (let me tell you – college honors classes are no joke!) but you don’t have every class every day. You don’t come home with calculus, government, biology, Italian and art homework every night, only to complete it and repeat the cycle the next day.

Most of the time, college homework is due a week after it’s assigned; even when it’s not, you have at least 48 hours until you have that class again. It’s a glorious thing! It was a bit of a shock to my system to have chunks of my day left open for whatever but if I plan it well, I can finish all my work by Wednesday and (gasp!) coast a little bit at the end of the week.

The bottom line is that college is probably the same amount of work as a high school schedule full of AP classes – it’s just different. So if you’re in APs now, breathe easy: You won’t be drowning in homework forever!

Darci Miller is a New Yorker studying journalism and sport administration at the University of Miami. When she’s not writing for the school newspaper, you can find her at the gym, either working or working out. She loves all ‘80s pop culture (the cheesier the better!), and glues herself to her TV when the Olympics are on. She dreams big, and believes the sky’s the limit!

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Making Connections in College

Campus Groups, Classes and Professional Organizations All Have Benefits

July 7, 2011

Making Connections in College

by Darci Miller

Once you hit college, you no longer have to build your resume to get into the school of your dreams but you do have to build your resume to get the career of your dreams. Trust me, the competition out there is tough and you’ll need any leg up than you can get. Luckily for you, college has a veritable goldmine of resources to help you.

First and foremost, take advantage of on-campus organizations related to your intended field. From clubs to fraternities, there will definitely be something for you to get involved with to make connections – both with professionals and with other students in your major. Older students can help you out with classes in future semesters and professionals can be great assets in securing internships.

Class assignments can be great opportunities to make connections as well. Last fall, my sport leadership professor assigned each student to interview a leader in the field they want to get into. As a U.S. Olympic Committee hopeful, I was able to interview Gary Hall, Sr., a former Olympic swimmer and current vice president of the U.S. Olympians Association. Not only was this insanely cool for me (I was so star struck!) but he wrote me a letter of recommendation that helped me get an interview with USA Swimming. And this all happened because of a homework assignment!

Professional organizations are significant assets as well. Many have chapters for college students to join and membership fees are fairly minimal. Joining one of these organizations gives you access to a vast network of connections. Though I’m not in one yet, I have a friend who’s a member of the Association of Women in Sports Media. She just graduated and credits the AWSM for helping her get a killer internship with MLB.com. (I think I need to join this, like, five minutes ago!) To find an organization that’s right for you, Google professional organizations for your major to start making connections. Happy hunting!

Darci Miller is a New Yorker studying journalism and sport administration at the University of Miami. When she’s not writing for the school newspaper, you can find her at the gym, either working or working out. She loves all ‘80s pop culture (the cheesier the better!), and glues herself to her TV when the Olympics are on. She dreams big, and believes the sky’s the limit!

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Life’s Lemons Aren’t Always Sour

July 13, 2011

Life’s Lemons Aren’t Always Sour

by Darci Miller

I’m the kind of person that has everything planned out (or tries to) so when it came to applying for internships, I was meticulous. I found over a dozen to apply to and wrote down all the application deadlines to keep myself on time. I spent weeks rewriting and reformatting my resume and drafting cover letter after cover letter. I emailed contacts, I got letters of recommendation, I went through everything I’ve ever written to find my best writing samples to send off. In the end, I hit send feeling rather optimistic.

Fast forward to a month and a half later. I’d just gotten my final rejection and was thoroughly miserable. I’d worked so hard, put in so much time and effort – how could I have failed so utterly?

As I checked my email, I noticed one from Scholarships.com advertising openings for virtual interns. I shrugged, thinking ‘might as well,’ and sent off my resume and writing samples. I also found internship openings on a blogging community I’d been a member of since seventh grade. How cool would it be for me to get credit for doing something I’d done for fun for seven years? With another shrug, I sent off my resume and writing samples. And within two weeks, I had two internships.

Okay, so I may not be interning with the U.S. Olympic Committee and spending my summer in Colorado. And I may not be getting paid. But what I am doing is having an absolute blast! I’m employed as a blogger so not only do I get to write about topics of my choice but I’m expanding my portfolio as a journalist. My bosses are wonderful, my fellow interns are all incredible people and I couldn’t be happier with how my summer turned out.

Bottom line: Life doesn’t always turn out the way you planned but that’s not always a bad thing. If you find yourself being rebuffed at every turn, by all means take some time to sulk (I most certainly did!) but regroup and get yourself back out there. Your unplanned experiences may be some of the greatest of your life.

Darci Miller is a New Yorker studying journalism and sport administration at the University of Miami. When she’s not writing for the school newspaper, you can find her at the gym, either working or working out. She loves all ‘80s pop culture (the cheesier the better!), and glues herself to her TV when the Olympics are on. She dreams big, and believes the sky’s the limit!

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Double Your Potential with a Double Major or Minor

July 15, 2011

Double Your Potential with a Double Major or Minor

by Jacquelene Bennett

With the soaring prices of college tuition, most college students are trying to get the biggest bang for their buck when paying for school. One way they’re doing this? Having more than one major or minor.

Now don’t be under any delusions: Having a double major or a double minor is a lot of work – and I mean A LOT – but it can be very rewarding. Not only do you get a leg up in the job market and grad school admissions but it makes your time in college more simulating.

I personally am a double major (government and creative writing) and I also minor in religious studies. It is stressful, yes, but it is very worthwhile. Not only am I studying things that I find important and interesting but I feel like I am preparing myself for a future career in journalism because all these fields of study seem to flow together.

That is the key to having more than one major or minor – they should complement each other. Crazy as it sounds, I have found that classes in religious studies and government are quite interconnected and I’m able to understand each subject more depth because I am studying the other. Analyzing what kind of career you want to have after college also helps: I know people majoring in psychology and religious studies, creative writing and business, or philosophy and anthropology because of their specific career goals.

Like I said before, having multiple majors or minors is stressful and balancing your coursework, a job and a social life can be a challenge. If you are curious or confused, talk to your advisor or other students undertaking this type of workload, as they can provide the insight you’ll need to make the right decision for you.

Jacquelene Bennett is a rising senior at the University of Redlands where her areas of study are creative writing, government and religious studies. When she is not studying or working, you can usually find her eating frozen yogurt or blogging about her day. She has a cactus named Kat and believes that Stephen Colbert is a genius. Jacquelene works hard, laughs hard and knows that one day you’ll see her name in lights.

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California Makes Cuts, Students Feel the Pain

June 28, 2011

California Makes Cuts, Students Feel the Pain

by Jacquelene Bennett

It was recently announced that many state-funded universities in California were eliminating or reducing summer sessions due to budget cutbacks. This news comes on the eve of California lawmakers finally passing a budget plan in the state senate that would help modify the California’s debt problems. While this plan may help with the state's deficit, it puts thousands of students in trouble.

Summer school has traditionally been a time for students to either gain headway with their degrees or to stay on track with their programs because of unforeseen circumstances during the regular academic year. But now due to the budget plan, some schools like West Los Angeles College are not offering summer courses at all while other schools such as Cal Poly Pomona are increasing summer tuition fees and offering fewer classes. It is also being reported that many state universities as well as several California community colleges will offer less for-credit courses while still maintaining and offering specialized training courses and not-for-credit classes for students during the summer.

So what does this mean for students? Not only will they have to pay more per unit for summer courses than if they were taking them during the traditional academic period but the available summer classes will be not-for-credit and the for-credit classes will be extremely difficult and expensive to register for. So with the already overcrowded state schools raising the tuition fees earlier this year, these new cuts will further delay a student's ability to graduate on time.

Jacquelene Bennett is a rising senior at the University of Redlands where her areas of study are creative writing, government and religious studies. When she is not studying or working, you can usually find her eating frozen yogurt or blogging about her day. She has a cactus named Kat and believes that Stephen Colbert is a genius. Jacquelene works hard, laughs hard and knows that one day you’ll see her name in lights.

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Meet Scholarships.com’s Virtual Interns: Jacquelene Bennett

May 13, 2011

Meet Scholarships.com’s Virtual Interns: Jacquelene Bennett

by Jacquelene Bennett

Hey yo! I am Jacquelene Bennett and come September, I will be a senior at the University of Redlands. I am double majoring in creative writing and government as well as minoring in religious studies – a lot of work, I know but as an aspiring writer/political journalist, I have found these subjects to be the most important and demanding issues in today’s world. Plus, these subjects (and the classes that accompany them) are intensely thought-provoking and fun; in fact, last semester, I wrote a short story about Marilyn Monroe for my fiction workshop!

I chose the University of Redlands mainly for its location. Born and raised in Southern California, I wanted to go to a school that was both close to home but far away enough that I could have a true “college experience.” Also, the U of R is in the heart of SoCal, so I am literally just an hour away (actual timing really depends on traffic here) from Los Angeles, San Diego, Disneyland, the Santa Monica Pier and Joshua Tree National Park. Since I began attending school, however, I have found the campus itself to be a treasure trove of beautiful scenery, fun events and wonderful people. True story: The U of R is one of only three California universities to be named a “Tree Campus” by the Arbor Day Foundation.

As I find myself getting closer and closer to graduation, I find that I have less and less spare time but in the rare moments that I am free, I like to listen to music, catch up on celebrity gossip and eat gummy bears and Fruit Gushers. Also, I like to say "cool beans."

From my freshman year up until now, I have built a repertoire of college knowledge and experiences just hoping that I would one day have the opportunity to share it with other people of the world. Well, it looks like that day has come and I am psyched!

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Pick Your Classes Wisely

October 27, 2011

Pick Your Classes Wisely

by Jacquelene Bennett

Sometimes the most difficult part of a university class is not the homework or the tests but the process of picking out and registering for the class itself! Seeing as though this will be my last time registering for classes, I thought I would pass along some tips and tricks of the trade.

Contrary to popular belief, you don’t want to overload your schedule with gen ed requirements early on in your college career; rather, you should aim for a nice balance between your gen eds and the classes you need to take for your major and/or minor. My rule has always been “half and half” – half of the classes I take are gen eds, while the other half is for my major or minor. This method not only keeps you from hating a semester because you were taking nothing but uninteresting classes but helps you in the long run by allowing you start on your degree requirements sooner.

Begin mapping out your course schedule with your adviser well before registration time. They can help you plan your classes semester by semester, give you insight on professors and create a list of back-up courses in case your first-choice classes are already filled by your registration date. You should also talk to friends or people who have taken the classes you’re interested in to get a feel for the material and workload.

Once you’ve registered for your next semester, make a list of classes that you want and need to take the following semesters as well. You’ll be able to see if you'll have time to pick up an internship, job or fun elective.

Jacquelene Bennett is a senior at the University of Redlands where her areas of study are creative writing, government and religious studies. When she is not studying or working, you can usually find her eating frozen yogurt or blogging about her day. She has a cactus named Kat and believes that Stephen Colbert is a genius. Jacquelene works hard, laughs hard and knows that one day you’ll see her name in lights.

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What to Do When You Hate a College Class

November 10, 2011

What to Do When You Hate a College Class

by Jacquelene Bennett

When you are preparing to graduate high school and are excited that you’ll be attending college in the fall, no one really tells you that there are going to be aspects of college life that you are going to absolutely hate, like classes: Sometimes you are going to really enjoy the classes you are taking, most of the time you are going to be indifferent about the classes you have and occasionally you are going to absolutely loathe a class you are taking. I currently find myself in this predicament and am here to share some advice on how to handle these types of classes.

Whatever you do, don’t skip the class! I know I said missing class is ok in moderation in my last article but avoiding a class you’re already down on never helps. Some professors record attendance every day and factor it into your grade so your absence will be noted.

Talk to the professor. Send him or her an email with your concerns or go talk to them during their office hours; most of the time, they will take your concerns into consideration – particularly if these concerns are echoed by other students. This approach is most effective if you can have a two-way conversation without sounding like you are complaining.

Grin and bear it. The class isn’t going to last forever; sometimes the best thing you can do is get your work done while reminding yourself you just need to make it to the end of the semester.

If you really can’t imagine attending the class all semester, you can always drop it or withdraw and try to take it with another professor next semester. You can also talk to your adviser about your other options: If the class is a gen ed, there may be similar but more enjoyable class that would fill the same requirement.

Jacquelene Bennett is a senior at the University of Redlands where her areas of study are creative writing, government and religious studies. When she is not studying or working, you can usually find her eating frozen yogurt or blogging about her day. She has a cactus named Kat and believes that Stephen Colbert is a genius. Jacquelene works hard, laughs hard and knows that one day you’ll see her name in lights.

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