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Not Ready for London 2012? Try the College Olympics First

by Radha Jhatakia

Recently, the College of Business clubs at San Jose State University held a Business Olympics. In this mini-Olympics, students from the various CoB clubs participated in many different athletic games and fun activities where students had the opportunity to get good workouts, blow off some steam and socialize with others.

According to the club board members who united to host the CoB Olympics, there was a great deal of planning involved. They had to ensure a date, time and space on campus where the games could be held, as well as find faculty members who would be willing to oversee the event since it was an on-campus activity. They also needed enough of the clubs in the College of Business to join so that there would be enough participants for a competition and needed to plan which games to play (touch football and volleyball tournaments, a five-legged race, a balloon stomp game, tug-of-war and business trivia). This being the bare minimum, the board members of the clubs went above and beyond for the event: They even found sponsors for the OlympicsMonster (energy drinks), State Farm Insurance and WiLD 94.9 (a local radio station) – that provided supplies, t-shirts, snacks, water and food for a barbeque after the event. After the eight-hour competition filled with bumps and bruises, we all left having made new connections with students from other clubs and the successful nature of the event will be continued in a now semi-annual College Olympics.

Depending on the department or major you are in, you can tailor the Olympics to fit your criteria and the great part is that this kind of event can be held by any organization on campus. Does your school have any Olympic-like event like SJSU's? If not, will this article help you in planning your own?

Radha Jhatakia is a communications major at San Jose State University. She's a transfer student who had some ups and downs in school and many obstacles to face; these challenges – plus support from family, friends and cat – have only made Radha stronger and have given her the experience to help others with the same issues. In her spare time, she enjoys writing, reading, cooking, sewing and designing. A social butterfly, Radha hopes to work in public relations and marketing upon graduation.


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Facial Piercings, Visible Tattoos and Your Future

by Radha Jhatakia

Tattoos and facial piercings have become part of modern day society and college culture. There is nothing wrong with this – I myself have seven piercings (three in each ear and one in my nose) and a tattoo – but with these artistic choices can come consequences that we may not think of when we are younger and attempting to fit in.

Many members of older generations do not view tattoos and piercings the same way we do. To them, they are forms of rebellion, disrespect and, most importantly, decisions that make it increasingly difficult to build favorable professional reputations. If you have a facial piercing, interviewing with a professional organization is risky: Unless you have an exceptional resume and amazing skills, most employers won't take you seriously.

Visible tattoos are deal breakers for many employers as well, especially for those who work alongside customers and are constantly representing the company. Professional workplaces will not tolerate visible tattoos; if you have any but also have your heart set on a career with this kind of organization, you should cover them up. Though many offices have adopted more casual dress codes, visible tattoos are still a long way from being accepted and could hurt your chances of getting hired: If there’s one position available and the other applicant has a cleaner cut appearance, you could lose out.

If you just have to get a tattoo or piercing, I am not going to try to stop you. Just remember that the choices you make now will affect you in the future.

Radha Jhatakia is a communications major at San Jose State University. She's a transfer student who had some ups and downs in school and many obstacles to face; these challenges – plus support from family, friends and cat – have only made Radha stronger and have given her the experience to help others with the same issues. In her spare time, she enjoys writing, reading, cooking, sewing and designing. A social butterfly, Radha hopes to work in public relations and marketing upon graduation.


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Job Fair Preparation: Why It Counts

by Radha Jhatakia

Job and internship fairs are students’ gateways to life after graduation because they provide exposure to what employment and internship opportunities are really out there. In addition to perusing the booths and picking up some swag, college students can also network and make connections with potential employers...but only if they prepare correctly.

The first thing college students should realize is that the recruiters are taking time out of their work days to come to speak to you. Their time is valuable and students should not waste it. Find out what companies will be at the fair ahead of time and research what they are looking for. A recruiter will be more willing to speak to someone who knows about their company than someone with no background knowledge. By doing your homework, you’ll show you are serious about your interest in working for this particular employer.

Second, dress professionally. Think of a job fair as a pre-interview: Recruiters will be turned off if you show up in informal attire, especially if they took the time to wear a suit. Leave the jeans, sneakers and college hoodies back at the dorm: Dressing professionally shows you are ready for the working world and committed to your goals.

Last but not least, have multiple copies of a polished resume with you. In the weeks leading up to the fair, bring your resume to your school’s career center and have them help fix it up. Remember to list your work history in reverse chronological order and highlight only your most significant and important achievements. You can also tailor your resume to fit specific companies – a move that definitely won’t go unnoticed.

These are the most important things I think college students should do when preparing for a job or internship fair but what’s worked best for you?

Radha Jhatakia is a communications major at San Jose State University. She's a transfer student who had some ups and downs in school and many obstacles to face; these challenges – plus support from family, friends and cat – have only made Radha stronger and have given her the experience to help others with the same issues. In her spare time, she enjoys writing, reading, cooking, sewing and designing. A social butterfly, Radha hopes to work in public relations and marketing upon graduation.


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BARC Can Give Your Career Some Bite!

Bay Area Retail Leadership Center Helps Students Learn from, Network with Professionals

February 28, 2012

BARC Can Give Your Career Some Bite!

by Radha Jhatakia

One of the best resources that college can offer you (besides an education, of course) is the opportunity to find employment after graduation. There are programs dedicated to helping students in different career fields and at SJSU, one of these opportunities comes with the Bay Area Retail Leadership Center, or BARC.

BARC consists of SJSU students and faculty who have partnered up with those in the retail industry. Currently, the list of partners includes Target, Walgreens, Kohl's, Verizon Wireless, Ross, Nike and Walmart and students are able to interact with professionals at these companies and gain insight to what working for a retail corporation will be like while networking and getting potential job offers.

BARC offers a study tour during which students travel to different headquarters and main offices of these companies – an advantageous experience that happens only twice a year. Apart from this, BARC hosts conferences in which speakers present on different aspects of how to make it to the retail industry; internships are also offered. Just like with any networking opportunity, though, it is up to the student to make the most of these prospects in the end.

If there is a program like BARC at your college, take advantage of it – there are so many unexplored opportunities! – but if a program like this doesn’t exist, speak with advisers and faculty to start one! It will be a great chance for you to launch a program that will not only help many individuals but will allow you to gain work experience and contacts in the professional world as well.

Radha Jhatakia is a communications major at San Jose State University. She's a transfer student who had some ups and downs in school and many obstacles to face; these challenges – plus support from family, friends and cat – have only made Radha stronger and have given her the experience to help others with the same issues. In her spare time, she enjoys writing, reading, cooking, sewing and designing. A social butterfly, Radha hopes to work in public relations and marketing upon graduation.


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One Opportunity Can Provide Experience in Multiple Fields

by Radha Jhatakia

College means different things to different people. For some, it’s a time to party and enjoy being away from home. For others, it’s a time to study and earn a degree. And for others still, it’s a time to utilize resources for post-college opportunities, like internships and volunteer work. These experiences help students develop skills that can be utilized in their careers of choice. But what if you have multiple majors or are considering work in a variety of fields after graduation? Is there one opportunity that can benefit all your future endeavors? You bet!

Take me, for instance: I am a communication studies major and I hope to go into marketing and public relations. Apart from communication skills, I will need to learn business techniques so I joined a business organization at my school. Good thing I did – I was immediately offered a job with the corporate relations board. Though the position is purely voluntary, I will learn a lot about the various aspects of working in the business world as well as organization and time management skills, presentation techniques and proper etiquette in the professional world.

These skills can definitely be applied to the careers I am interested in but the benefits continue: These skills can be applied to any profession in any field. All employers appreciate an employee who can manage time and work, give efficient presentations and is precise with their work. I encourage you today to get involved today, whether the position is paid, volunteer or for course credit. There is no harm in applying – I applied to be one of Scholarships.com's virtual interns and now I have some writing experience which is useful in every career!

Radha Jhatakia is a communications major at San Jose State University. She's a transfer student who had some ups and downs in school and many obstacles to face; these challenges – plus support from family, friends and cat – have only made Radha stronger and have given her the experience to help others with the same issues. In her spare time, she enjoys writing, reading, cooking, sewing and designing. A social butterfly, Radha hopes to work in public relations and marketing upon graduation.


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Meet Scholarships.com's Virtual Interns: Radha Jhatakia

by Radha Jhatakia

Hi all! My name is Radha and I’m one of Scholarships.com’s newest virtual interns!

In high school, I was a well-rounded student – high GPA, honors classes, extracurricular activities and volunteer work...you name it, I did it – but after getting accepted by both the University of the Pacific and the University of San Francisco, limited finances and financial aid prevented me from attending either school. To save money to put toward transferring, I instead enrolled in De Anza College and Evergreen Valley College to complete my gen eds. It wasn’t easy (De Anza was a distant commute and made it difficult for me to take the classes I needed to transfer) but I amassed enough credits to transfer after two years. I didn’t get into my first choice (UCLA) and my second choice (Berkeley) did not have my intended major so I enrolled at UCSB, where I was accepted into the Honors Program and received plenty of financial aid. Unfortunately, things didn’t work out as planned when my transfer status affected my major so I am back at EVC but transferring to San Jose State University in the fall. Whew!

I’ve always enjoyed writing (I hope to write a book someday) and I believe my interest in working with others – plus my excellent persuasion abilities – will lend itself to a career in public relations. Being a Scholarships.com virtual interns complements my goals perfectly: It’s an excellent opportunity to gain experience in something I enjoy doing and since I’m always looking for scholarships to pay for school, writing for a website that helps students do just that seemed ideal. Hope you’ll all enjoy reading my opinions and advice just as much as I enjoy sharing them!


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College: The Ultimate Life Lesson

by Radha Jhatakia

There are many things I wish I knew before I started college...or even a year or two in! Tips about what professors are difficult, what dining halls serve the best food and where to find the dorms with the most square footage are quite often available but the biggest tip – which you won’t realize until you’re done with school – is that college itself teaches you how to get by in life.

The process begins before college with the prep work you do. You take six classes a semester in high school when during college you take three to five classes depending on the semester or quarter system. You take the SAT or ACT, which test your ability to take a test itself, not your intellectual abilities. You participate in every extracurricular possible to make your transcripts appealing, only to realize that those activities won’t really matter on campus. All of these tasks are tests: In college, you’ll spread yourself thin between a job, challenging classes, clubs and your social life but thanks to your prep work, you’ll know how to balance it all.

Once you’re on campus, college prepares you for the obstacles and struggles that await everyone after graduation. You’ll take engineering courses, biology labs and communications lectures and complete projects and papers to gauge how well you can apply the material you’ve learned and tight deadlines to help you to think on your feet. Whether you’re finding a way to pay off student loans or trying to secure a job in your field, those seemingly small assignments you completed in college will have prepared you to deal with the real world.

You’ll gain a lot from your college experience – friends, memories, knowledge – but most importantly is your degree, a testimony that you will be able to make it in life beyond those hallowed halls.

Radha Jhatakia is a communications major who will be transferring to San Jose State University this fall. She’s had some ups and downs in school and many obstacles to face; these challenges – plus support from family, friends and cat – have only made Radha stronger and have given her the experience to help others with the same issues. In her spare time, she enjoys writing, reading, cooking, sewing and designing. A social butterfly, Radha hopes to work in public relations and marketing upon graduation.


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What Are My Career Options?

by Radha Jhatakia

When we begin college, we all have ideal jobs we want after graduating. We explore the majors which will allow us to go into these fields and choose schools based on which ones have the best programs for our intended futures. Then we graduate, ready to achieve those goals, but how many of us actually get our dream jobs right away?

While some students are offered jobs in their fields quickly, others aren’t as fortunate. Many recent grads spend months interviewing before settling on something – anything – to pay the bills or realize they can’t do what they wanted with their degree and must gain additional certification or experience. Nothing can guarantee you will be able to do what you’ve always dreamed right out of school but there are ways to prepare yourself for either situation.

Use your college resources from the beginning. All colleges have career centers and counselors who can assist you with internships, jobs and post-college options. Meet with them and create a career plan first semester freshman year instead of last semester senior year. By doing so, you could obtain a job freshman year to help you gain some work experience, serve as a TA during your sophomore year and gain an excellent recommendation letter, score an internship in your field of study during your junior year and continue it in your senior year, then either get a job offer from that internship or at least have a resume or portfolio to present to potential employers who will be amazed with your dedication. Not bad!

If you haven’t found your dream job after you graduate, don’t give up your hope. Everyone has to start somewhere and for most people, it isn’t what they would consider ideal. If you are persistent, work efficiently without complaint and show that you are capable of doing much more, your employers won’t waste your potential.

Radha Jhatakia is a communications major who will be transferring to San Jose State University this fall. She’s had some ups and downs in school and many obstacles to face; these challenges – plus support from family, friends and cat – have only made Radha stronger and have given her the experience to help others with the same issues. In her spare time, she enjoys writing, reading, cooking, sewing and designing. A social butterfly, Radha hopes to work in public relations and marketing upon graduation.


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Confused in College? Contact a Counselor!

by Radha Jhatakia

You enter college with a major in mind and a plan to get a degree in it. You don’t let the fine print surrounding general education classes, major classes and GPA get in your way but you still may hit a snag or two. If this happens, seek out a counselor.

There is a difference between a general education (G.E.) counselor and a major counselor. A G.E. counselor is there to make sure you get your G.E.s done, have enough credits to graduate and have successfully completed all classes. A major counselor, on the other hand, will make sure you take all the classes you need to get your intended degree. Getting a degree and graduating are two very different things balancing on a fine line.

The assistance you get really depends on the counselor so meet with a few and select the one who “gets” you best. If you have a counselor who isn’t 100-percent sure of the university’s curriculum or graduation/degree requirements, switch as soon as you can; you don’t want to be filing your graduation petition only to realize you are missing a requirement! A good counselor will make it mandatory for you to meet with them a few times each semester to make sure you are on track. He or she will also help you with an education plan so that you know what is necessary to graduate. A great counselor will even recommend that you get a second opinion on his or her advice so don’t be afraid to do so.

You may have known what you wanted to major in forever but don’t let your pride get in the way of accepting some assistance. You’ll be better off for it even after you graduate...which you will, thanks to your counselor’s expertise!

Radha Jhatakia is a communications major who will be transferring to San Jose State University this fall. She’s had some ups and downs in school and many obstacles to face; these challenges – plus support from family, friends and cat – have only made Radha stronger and have given her the experience to help others with the same issues. In her spare time, she enjoys writing, reading, cooking, sewing and designing. A social butterfly, Radha hopes to work in public relations and marketing upon graduation.


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Meet Scholarships.com's Virtual Interns: Samuel Favela

by Samual Favela

Hey guys! My name is Samuel Favela (you can call me Samwell) and I’m currently a journalism major at Long Beach City College. Nice to meet you all!

What’s my story? I used to attend Cal Poly Pomona but left because, like most college students, I had no idea what direction I was going in. After a year off, I decided to move back home and try out a community college; I had my doubts at first but by mid-term, I LOVED my new school! The environment was fresh, there was so much diversity and the people there were actually willing to carry a conversation with me. I quickly realized I had a better connection there than I did at Cal Poly with both local students and ones from all over the nation.

My interest in journalism transpired from me always writing on my own time, taking pictures of cool random things and my people skills. To be honest, it was a lucky guess: I only took the classes because they were open and I needed four more units to get financial aid but two classes into my first journalism class (public relations), I was hooked. I even received an award for being at the top of my class. Good guess, huh? As of right now, I am interested in transferring to Cal State Long Beach after I take all the classes I need at LBCC, but who knows? I didn't expect to be going to LBCC and given how much I like change, I wouldn’t be surprised if I end up in New York!

What do I hope to get out of this virtual internship? I love the thought of being the voice for a community or generation. I have a voice I know how to use and if I can speak for someone who can't say the words themself, it would be my honor. I hope this is the start of a beautiful virtual relationship! :)


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