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International Men's Day Cancelled at University After Complaints Surface

Nov 17, 2015

by Susan Dutca

The University of York cancelled International Men's Day (IMD) on Thursday after outraged students, staff, and alumni protested comments made by a male faculty member and requested an apology for "the manner in which it [the release] was framed." Dr. Aidan Lee of the University’s Equality and Diversity Committee stated that "[although there's focus on] raising awareness about - and removing barriers for - women," there are "some specific issues faced by men" that must be addressed.

Dr. Adrian Lee, of the University's Equality and Diversity Committee, claims that men are "significantly under-represented in a number of academic disciplines." In specific areas such as academic staff appointments or professional support series, "the support staff complement is often heavily weighted towards women, with some departments employing no men at all in these roles." The United States Department of Labor shows in 2014, 36% of women were employed in educational and health industries and only 10.9% of males were employed in the same field.

Despite statistics, students and staff were offended by Dr. Lee and wrote an open letter to the Chair of the Equality and Diversity Committee, expressing their discontent. 200 signatures from students, staff and alumni supported the letter, demanding "a 'full account' of how supporting/promoting men's issues 'in this way' was acceptable by the committee." The group called for an apology for "the use of dubious scholarship in the claim that women are advantaged in hiring processes." Dr. Duncan's apologetic email was posted on the university's webpage, and the IMD event was cancelled. According to the IMD website, International Men's Day is "optional" and "focuses on...improving gender relations and promoting gender equality," ironically the main issue highlighted by women's rights activists.

Students are currently campaigning to reinstate International Men's Day because "it is important that we recognize men's day just as much as women's day. True feminists should be fighting for gender equality for both men and women. To cancel men’s day is simply hypocritical. Equality is not just for women and should concern both genders." What should the university do? Whose side are you on? Share your thoughts and start a discussion below.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Sugar Baby University - A New Way to "Pay" for College?

Nov 3, 2015

by Susan Dutca

To help tackle the issue of rising tuition costs, thousands of British students are paying for college by using "sugar daddy" websites. One particular site, SeekingArrangement.com, has 12,600 UK students signed up with proof of college enrollment. Their motto? "You + SeekingArrangement = No College Debt." SeekingArrangment is a way for "beautiful, ambitious people to graduate debt free" through "arrangements with older sponsors." Is the world of "sugar daddy" relationships a mutually beneficial dating experience, or just another term for "sex work"?

According to Fox News, users claim there is a huge difference between "providing company for men" to support their college education and prostitution. According to one 20-year-old student on SeekingArrangement.com, she earns $2,000 a month from the "sexual arrangement." She claims, "I've saved quite a lot. It pays for my travel, my books, and I haven't had to take out a student loan. I've been quite well off.” Brandon Wade, the founder of SeekingArrangements.com, believes it enables "sugar babies" to "upgrade their lifestyle" and is therefore not an escort service. Wade claims sex was never expected, neither were the countless marriages worldwide that resulted from the pairings. "You want to find somebody who is well educated and who can provide for you financially, you know, so it's sort of the Disney dream per say," claims Wade.

However, for one married 62-year-old sugar daddy who is currently seeing four sugar babies, "sex is an integral part of the site." According to the man, "I wouldn't be able to meet girls as young and as beautiful as this through an ordinary dating site." Sugar daddies such as him believe that the consensual relationships are appropriate for students seeking to supplement their bank accounts without having to spend "eight hours slogging in a bar only earning minimum wage." The general consensus between both parties is that expectations go both ways and that sugar daddies "provide money to individuals who decide they want a certain type of relationship." Whether it be a means to cure loneliness, or for those who simply don't have the time for a committed relationship, several women have agreed that they "always end up getting what they want financially, and that's the whole point. You've got to play the system."

Although Scholarships.com neither condones nor condemns the aforementioned practice, we believe that paying for college doesn't have to be daunting, and that the best way to fund your college education is through scholarships. Check out how many you qualify for today, and start earning free money for college.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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NAU Student Hustles To Pay For College Textbooks With Drug Money

Oct 29, 2015

by Susan Dutca

Earlier this week, 18 year old NAU student Francisco Curiel was charged for selling and possessing illegal drugs and paraphernalia. Why was he selling? Allegedly, to pay for books. Although on a full ride to Northern Arizona University, Curiel supposedly had an outstanding balance of $600 to pay for books and materials. After a room search, police found two bags of powder and plastic tubes with cocaine residue. He and his roommate, Damian Hernandez, were both arrested with charges of possession and sale of narcotics and paraphernalia.

Last year Census data revealed that 72 percent of undergraduate college students worked a job while in school to pay for costs that financial aid does not cover. Though typical jobs include working at a coffee shop, waiting tables or retail, some students are opting to take the non-traditional route by selling drugs since the drastic change in opinion of the legalization of marijuana. According to Pew Research Center, support for marijuana legalization is rapidly outpacing opposition with a majority (53%) of Americans in support of legalization. Growing support is evidenced by four states who have already legalized marijuana, including: Oregon, Washington, Colorado and Alaska. Furthermore, there is a handful of other states looking to pursue similar suit, such as: Massachusetts, California, Missouri, Hawaii, Maine, Nevada and Ohio. These statistics however, give no insight as to people's opinions on the selling of heavier drugs, such as cocaine.

While there are monetary benefits to selling drugs such as reducing or eliminating college debt, student dealers admit there are severe consequences if caught selling. One anonymous student at Boise State claimed, "If I get thrown in jail, my bail is going to be more than what I make." An undercover detective with the Boise Police Department stresses the importance in avoiding such involvement, as it could cost a year sentence in prison or felony charge. Felony charges drastically affect future career opportunities and felons risk unemployment. Often the "middle man" is charged with the same sentence as the seller. The detective urges students to continue applying for scholarships and constantly talking to college financial aid offices for more monetary assistance.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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What’s All the Yik Yak About Social Media Harassment?

Oct 23, 2015

by Susan Dutca

With the help of the federal government, seventy-two women's and civil-rights groups are launching a campaign to pressure colleges into protecting students from anonymous, threatening social-media posts. Users are able to post anonymously on apps such as Yik Yak - dialogues that aren't necessarily classroom-appropriate. Discussions sometimes contain racist, sexist and other derogatory content which has led to college arrests due to campus threats. According to the groups' letter to the Office for Civil Rights, colleges fail to monitor the anonymous posts or pursue harassers due to colleges' "vague First Amendment concerns." Whose voice is more important in this situation?

Social-networking platforms that attract online harassment such as Yik Yak, 4chan, and BurnBook have safeguards that can be easily maneuvered by slightly changing works like "rape" to "grape." Community monitoring allows students to "down-vote" such comments for removal but does not prevent the initial posting. Some posts go beyond sexual harassment and threaten students with rape and murder, as seen at the University of Mary Washington. The Office of Civil Rights launched an investigation due to alleged Title IX violations. Colleges tend to avoid responsibility for online harassment on social media platforms mostly because students do not need university servers for access.

Yik Yak's popularity is evidenced by their $60 million in investments and is one of the most profitable social-media applications that allows anonymous discussions. While some organizations such as the Feminists United and the Feminist Majority Foundation are pushing for Yik Yak's ban, Dr. Junco at Harvard University studied the app and would "hate to see colleges prevent students' use of the application, because many of the statements made on it… are positive or affirming."

In your opinion, should Yik Yak and other similar apps be banned or not? Share your thoughtful opinions with us in the comment box below.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Harvard Transgender Swimmer Dives Into New Waters

Oct 20, 2015

by Susan Dutca

What happens when your high school 100-meter breast stroke time is almost as fast as the women's all-time best at Harvard, the school you've been eying for as long as you could remember - but you determine you can no longer repress the feeling that you are a man trapped inside a woman's body? Such was the case for swimmer Schuyler Bailer, who underwent partial surgery, now identifies as a man and will compete on the Harvard men's swim team. The NCAA allowed Bailer to choose what team to swim for and Harvard’s women's swim coach supports Bailer's decision even if it means losing a top recruit.

Bailer took a year off following high school graduation and made the decision to identify as a man after having repressed these feelings from a very young age. Bailer claimed, "I had worked my whole life to be on that team," and that the coming-out-of-the-closet experience was stressful enough. Bailer is realistic about future stresses, such as competing with a new gender, locker room etiquette and media scrutiny. However, transgender athletes have been around since 1977, when Renée Richard joined the women's tennis professional tour after the New York Supreme Court had intervened. Another recent, well-known case is that of Olympic decathlete Bruce Jenner, who transitioned to Caitlyn Jenner. Is the male to female transition the same as female to male transition, when it comes to athletics?

Various organizations at the junior, high school and collegiate level have begun implementing rules that allow transgender students to participate on the basis of their expressed gender identities. Even at the highest level of sport competition, the Olympics, athletes are able to participate only if they have had their gender-reassignment surgery and at least two years of hormone therapy. In the NCAA, men transitioning to women who have not undergone sex-reassignment surgery must take testosterone suppressants for one year before they can compete on the women's team. (This means Bailer would be allowed to continue on the women's team if he has not yet starting taking testosterone). Though Bailer's transition has been welcomed and supported by the NCAA and his team, he may still face discrimination and scrutiny.

In your opinion, should transgender individuals be allowed to compete with and against their biological gender group? Leave us your thoughts below in the comment box and be sure to check out our large list of sports scholarships.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Is College Football Stealing Your Education?

Oct 19, 2015

by Susan Dutca

To date, roughly 70 percent of college students graduate with approximately $30,000 in college debt. What accounts for the increase in college tuition and debt burden? A short by Brave New Films titled The Big Came: College Football Stealing Your Education claims that college athletics, particularly football, may just be the problem. Since 2000, state universities across the nation have increased their tuition by 30 percent. Schools with strong football programs have increased tuition by as much as 65 percent. Studies reveal a correlation between student fees that feed directly into athletic programs and force tuition hikes. Ohio University for example, has athletic fees that run $48 a credit hour. That is about $6,000 of financial aid and scholarships that goes into paying for schools' athletic programs.

How does this affect school budgets? Many universities have taken to cutting faculty and degree programs, such as the University of Akron, which cut 215 jobs and $40 million dollars from their budget and yet, tuition did not go down. Head Football Coach Terry Bowden was signed to a $2 million contract, which comes out to $400,000 a year. When compared to the average adjunct professor salary of $25,000, it is important to consider the allocation of money within higher education. According to the Huff Post, most state coaches are the highest paid public employees.

Supporters of collegiate athletic programs argue that there's immense profit, but this is debatable as it's been found that Division I athletic programs lose $11 million a year on an operating basis and much more when capital and indirect costs are included. Athletic programs may not be as self-supporting if "the vast majority require a subsidy from the institution" to survive. Students will pay separate fees and higher tuition to cushion the deficit - these fees will not help fix classrooms or hire faculty. Alumni who donate to schools are typically donors to athletic programs rather than student or academic scholarships. It may make sense that the revenue generated from winning teams would feed directly into the athletic program and yet, those same programs remain in deficit.

In your opinion, do you think collegiate athletic programs are distorting expenditures and neglecting other important areas in higher education? Leave us your opinion in the comment section below. If you are an dedicated, passionate and talented athlete, check out some of our sports scholarships.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Average College Students Spend $1,225 on Textbooks

Oct 15, 2015

by Susan Dutca

Research indicates that the average college student spent $1,225 on books in the 2014-2015 academic year. In lieu of the one of the most overlooked costs of going to college and barriers to attending college, U.S. Senators Dick Durbin, Al Franken and Angus King introduced legislation to help make college textbooks more affordable. The College Textbook Affordability Act would take high quality textbooks and make them easily accessible and free to students, professors and the public. Buying books for college is inevitable - but is there a way to make it less pocket-draining?

Textbook costs have skyrocketed since 1977 by a daunting 1,041 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. What most people don't know is that publishing companies have enormous textbook charges for the smallest changes in content and unwanted bundled material. Add those insignificant changes plus high prices and you have students investing in materials that are seldom touched. Do students really have a way around these expensive materials? Perhaps you have tried to scan "on reserve" textbooks in your library or share with your classmates. Some versions of the textbook may be located online for free, but will typically only offer a preview. At the end of the day, it is almost impossible to pass courses without purchasing the materials. Durbin is seeking to also provide open education resources (OERs) to grant students better accessibility to materials, whether it be online or downloading to a digital device.

The upsides to this change are obvious: cheaper textbooks, greater accessibility and more college affordability. But can this lead to the death of textbooks? What happens to traditional pedagogy and educational practice? With the new wave of educational technology, the ways in which students acquire information, how students are tested and how teachers fit into the picture may be affected. Artificial intelligence now has students entranced in screens, which is believed to cause detrimental physical and cognitive development. Lowering the cost of textbooks is one thing - switching platform is another thing. Nancie Atwell best summarizes this point: "Technology is a means; it's not an end. And it's become an end within this country."

Do you support the transition to eBooks, open textbooks and the like, or do you support traditional textbooks? What do you think is the best method in resolving the issue of overpriced textbooks? There are schools that will pay full tuition and fees, if you qualify for the scholarship.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Cracking the New SAT

Oct 12, 2015

by Christina Zhou

If you've been studying for the old SAT, you only have a short amount of time left to take it. This standardized test is undergoing a redesigning process, a fact that leaves many high school students even more stressed about the test than before, especially juniors and seniors girding themselves for college applications. All the prep books from past years are obsolete! However, given what we currently know about the future format of the SAT, there are several ways to get ahead of the game and do well despite the unfamiliar format.
  • If you don't know, guess. Although the old SAT format penalized guessing by a deduction of a quarter of a point per wrong answer, the new SAT has no such penalty. Therefore, it is in your best interest to provide an answer for each question, especially if you're running out of time. Leaving questions blank is now the worst decision. Additionally, the number of possible choices per question is being reduced. So now if you guess wildly, you will have a greater chance of being right than before.
  • Forget vocab lists. No longer will you have to frantically memorize huge lists of practically obsolete vocabulary words in order to do well on the reading section of the SAT. The new SAT will have terminology more likely to be seen in the real world.
  • Other subjects matter. The new SAT will include either an excerpt from one of America's founding documents or issues discussing freedom, injustice and the like. Therefore, it would be in your best interest to become familiarized with some of the more well-known documents to save time during the test. Additionally, skills like graph reading and analysis, usually seen more in science subjects, will be featured in the new format.
  • Don't stress it. An increasingly high number of colleges are eschewing standardized tests as part of the admission process, turning it into a voluntary option. If you don’t do well the first time, study hard and try again, but don’t be discouraged.
  • And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Video Gaming: The Up-And-Coming Collegiate Sport

Oct 8, 2015

by Susan Dutca

This past Saturday at 9 a.m., players arrived at the University of Cincinnati's basketball arena for a two-day tournament hosted by the UC's League of...Legends? Yes: The university now considers League of Legends an official club sport, just like soccer or rugby. With 14,000 people watching the tournament online, the event became one of the largest collegiate e-sports events with participants competing for a $2,000 cash prize. But is it a game or is it a sport?

Though skeptical at first, UC's administration finally caved and are now seeing the benefits of the League. There has been increased visibility for video gamers across campuses, especially now that it's organized and holds educational value. Gaming competitions are legitimized through rules and regulations, though not yet under the rule of the NCAA. Furthermore, the U.S. government allows professional video gamers to use "athlete visas" to travel internationally to compete. With this trend, one may argue that video games aren't necessarily becoming more popular but rather it's a "formalization and institutionalization of what's always been present."

Robert Morris University in Chicago became the first U.S. college to make competitive gaming a varsity sport and offer video game scholarships up to half of tuition and housing, roughly $19,000. Video game sponsors helped RMU create the ideal gaming room with high-tech monitors, headsets and chairs so that students resemble fighter pilots. Though they fell short to the University of British Columbia in the 2015 North American Collegiate Championship, RMU competitors still received $15,000 in scholarships while UBC took home the $30,000 championship trophy.

What do you think about getting paid to game? If you are an avid gamer and want to be rewarded for your talent and passion, check out some video game and design scholarships to celebrate International Games Day on November 21st.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Should Political Correctness Trump Personal Opinion?

Oct 6, 2015

by Susan Dutca

Last week, a Mount Holyoke College professor allegedly went around his class trying to guess what racial slurs minority students might have been called in their lifetime. Students claimed the exercise was a form of racial discrimination. In this day and age, we are more politically correct than ever before. College students now think twice before raising their hands to offer an opinion on sensitive or controversial topics. Similarly, professors have become more reluctant to analyze and dissect material that may trigger negative emotional responses. We fear that what we may say will offend someone else, even if we had not intended to do so. There has been a large "institutionalization of microagression" - small actions or word choices that are not intended to be malicious but are considered violent nonetheless. Where there once was the freedom of academic speech and healthy debating of opposing ideas, there is now a constant defense of students' emotions. This coddling, which infantilizes and diminishes intellectual discussion now exists to prevent countless lawsuits and could be considered an overprotection of "adult" students' psyches. For students looking to take on adulthood in college, should that require thicker skin and learning to listen to, and accept other people's opinions?

Best discussed in The Atlantic, there has been a drastic climate change in America's higher education where we have elevated the "goals of protecting students from psychological harm." This new "vindictive protectiveness" is believed to have emerged during the 1980s, in order to protect women and minority individuals from offensive speech. There is now a strong censorship of speech and of intellectual thinking for students and professors. Cautious to not offend anyone or for fear that students may cry victim at the slightest opposition to their opinion, institutions have implemented trigger warnings - alerts that professors issue if they sense strong emotional discomfort from students. Professor Hill, English professor at Mount Holyoke had asked his students to give examples of modern day racial slurs – within the context of analyzing Robinson Crusoe and the book's use of the term "papist". Going around the classroom, Professor Hill had pointed out specific minorities and guessed what racial slurs may have been used to describe. Students took offense to this exercise and later detailed the insensible and discriminatory nature of the lesson.

President Obama has taken to the issue of coddled college students, microaggression, and culture of victimhood and stated, "I don't agree you have to be coddled and protected from different points of view. Anybody who comes to speak to you and you disagree with, you should have an argument with them, but you shouldn't silence them by saying you can't come because I'm too sensitive to hear what you have to say." How, if at all, can we find a balance between free academic speech and protecting students' emotions?

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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80 Prestige Schools Team up to Redesign Common Application

Sep 29, 2015

by Susan Dutca

In less than a month the world of higher education has moved forward with changes to the traditional approaches in the college application and admission process - first, with the simplified and updated FAFSA to appear in October 2016 and now, with 80 colleges and universities building a platform to streamline the application process that they hope to debut in summer of 2016. The goal is to get rid of the old "formulaic approach" and to strengthen the communication system between students and colleges, especially for those who lack adequate and sufficient college-going resources.

October and November are notorious for being high-stress months for high school seniors race as they race to meet early application deadlines. Students and families from more affluent backgrounds often have better-equipped and resourceful educators in contrast to their disadvantaged, low-income counterparts. To remove any barriers that would prevent students from applying to college, the "coalition" group, called the Coalition for Access, Affordability and Success, first announced its plan for a more retro application last fall, which would house smaller membership and different requirements. Among the 83 colleges and universities that have started creating the joint application portal, 52 are private schools and 31 are public schools; several Ivy League schools as well as other elite and highly selective liberal arts institutions are represented. In order to participate, colleges must demonstrate at least 70% of students graduate within six years and private colleges must vow to meet the financial need of all U.S. students. Similarly, public institutions must have affordable in-state tuition and strong financial aid.

The new application would serve as an alternative to the Common Application, and schools may choose to keep the former version, according to the Los Angeles Times. The new application would allow students to create a portfolio by storing their schoolwork while also receiving advice and information on colleges and financial aid. With this new format, the coalition hopes to "motivate a strong college-going mindset among students of all backgrounds, especially those from low-income families or underrepresented groups who have historically had less access to leading colleges and universities."

Do you think this initiative would appeal to more and students and simplify the application process? College and financial aid applications can be tedious, as well as applying for financial aid which is why we are here to assist you as you apply for college.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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