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NAU Student Hustles To Pay For College Textbooks With Drug Money


Oct 29, 2015

Earlier this week, 18 year old NAU student Francisco Curiel was charged for selling and possessing illegal drugs and paraphernalia. Why was he selling? Allegedly, to pay for books. Although on a full ride to Northern Arizona University, Curiel supposedly had an outstanding balance of $600 to pay for books and materials. After a room search, police found two bags of powder and plastic tubes with cocaine residue. He and his roommate, Damian Hernandez, were both arrested with charges of possession and sale of narcotics and paraphernalia. [...]

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17 months ago 2 comments

With the help of the federal government, seventy-two women's and civil-rights groups are launching a campaign to pressure colleges into protecting students from anonymous, threatening social-media posts. Users are able to post anonymously on apps such as Yik Yak - dialogues that aren't necessarily classroom-appropriate. Discussions sometimes contain racist, sexist and other derogatory content which has led to college arrests due to campus threats. According to the groups' letter to the Office for Civil Rights, colleges fail to monitor the anonymous posts or pursue harassers due to colleges' "vague First Amendment concerns." Whose voice is more important in this situation? [...]

17 months ago 10 comments Read More

What happens when your high school 100-meter breast stroke time is almost as fast as the women's all-time best at Harvard, the school you've been eying for as long as you could remember - but you determine you can no longer repress the feeling that you are a man trapped inside a woman's body? Such was the case for swimmer Schuyler Bailer, who underwent partial surgery, now identifies as a man and will compete on the Harvard men's swim team. The NCAA allowed Bailer to choose what team to swim for and Harvard’s women's swim coach supports Bailer's decision even if it means losing a top recruit. [...]

17 months ago 25 comments Read More

To date, roughly 70 percent of college students graduate with approximately $30,000 in college debt. What accounts for the increase in college tuition and debt burden? A short by Brave New Films titled The Big Came: College Football Stealing Your Education claims that college athletics, particularly football, may just be the problem. Since 2000, state universities across the nation have increased their tuition by 30 percent. Schools with strong football programs have increased tuition by as much as 65 percent. Studies reveal a correlation between student fees that feed directly into athletic programs and force tuition hikes. Ohio University for example, has athletic fees that run $48 a credit hour. That is about $6,000 of financial aid and scholarships that goes into paying for schools' athletic programs. [...]

17 months ago 31 comments Read More

Research indicates that the average college student spent $1,225 on books in the 2014-2015 academic year. In lieu of the one of the most overlooked costs of going to college and barriers to attending college, U.S. Senators Dick Durbin, Al Franken and Angus King introduced legislation to help make college textbooks more affordable. The College Textbook Affordability Act would take high quality textbooks and make them easily accessible and free to students, professors and the public. Buying books for college is inevitable - but is there a way to make it less pocket-draining?

Textbook costs have skyrocketed since 1977 by a daunting 1,041 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. What most people don't know is that publishing companies have enormous textbook charges for the smallest changes in content and unwanted bundled material. Add those insignificant changes plus high prices and you have students investing in materials that are seldom touched. Do students really have a way around these expensive materials? Perhaps you have tried to scan "on reserve" textbooks in your library or share with your classmates. Some versions of the textbook may be located online for free, but will typically only offer a preview. At the end of the day, it is almost impossible to pass courses without purchasing the materials. Durbin is seeking to also provide open education resources (OERs) to grant students better accessibility to materials, whether it be online or downloading to a digital device. [...]

17 months ago 4 comments Read More
If you've been studying for the old SAT, you only have a short amount of time left to take it. This standardized test is undergoing a redesigning process, a fact that leaves many high school students even more stressed about the test than before, especially juniors and seniors girding themselves for college applications. All the prep books from past years are obsolete! However, given what we currently know about the future format of the SAT, there are several ways to get ahead of the game and do well despite the unfamiliar format. If you don't know, guess. Although the old SAT format penalized guessing by a deduction of a quarter of a point per wrong answer, the new SAT has no such penalty. Therefore, it is in your best interest to provide an answer for each question, especially if [...]
17 months ago 0 comments Read More

This past Saturday at 9 a.m., players arrived at the University of Cincinnati's basketball arena for a two-day tournament hosted by the UC's League of...Legends? Yes: The university now considers League of Legends an official club sport, just like soccer or rugby. With 14,000 people watching the tournament online, the event became one of the largest collegiate e-sports events with participants competing for a $2,000 cash prize. But is it a game or is it a sport? [...]

17 months ago 4 comments Read More

Last week, a Mount Holyoke College professor allegedly went around his class trying to guess what racial slurs minority students might have been called in their lifetime. Students claimed the exercise was a form of racial discrimination. In this day and age, we are more politically correct than ever before. College students now think twice before raising their hands to offer an opinion on sensitive or controversial topics. Similarly, professors have become more reluctant to analyze and dissect material that may trigger negative emotional responses. We fear that what we may say will offend someone else, even if we had not intended to do so. There has been a large "institutionalization of microagression" - small actions or word choices that are not intended to be malicious but are considered violent nonetheless. Where there once was the freedom of academic speech and healthy debating of opposing ideas, there is now a constant defense of students' emotions. This coddling, which infantilizes and diminishes intellectual discussion now exists to prevent countless lawsuits and could be considered an overprotection of "adult" students' psyches. For students looking to take on adulthood in college, should that require thicker skin and learning to listen to, and accept other people's opinions? [...]

17 months ago 41 comments Read More

In less than a month the world of higher education has moved forward with changes to the traditional approaches in the college application and admission process - first, with the simplified and updated FAFSA to appear in October 2016 and now, with 80 colleges and universities building a platform to streamline the application process that they hope to debut in summer of 2016. The goal is to get rid of the old "formulaic approach" and to strengthen the communication system between students and colleges, especially for those who lack adequate and sufficient college-going resources. [...]

18 months ago 16 comments Read More

If you've ever had to fill out a FAFSA for college, you may have felt as though you need an accounting degree to understand it, much less complete it. With over 130 questions and averaging 30 minutes to complete, the complexity and tedium of filing for financial aid has been a barrier for students in attending college or receiving the financial aid for which they qualify. The Department of Education announced an initiative Monday to simplify the process and beginning in October 2016, students and their families will be able to complete a simpler FAFSA application.

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18 months ago 12 comments Read More

All was quiet on DePauw University's campus in Greencastle, Indiana on Wednesday until a group of Bible-carrying protesters arrived, shouting that students who engaged in "unholy behaviors," including homosexuality, excessive sexuality, drug and alcohol use, and masturbating, were going to hell. The group of confrontational evangelists, also known as "Bro. Jed's School of Evangelism" Campus Ministry USA, are allegedly known for organizing campus protests and are not affiliated with a particular church. Students ignored the protest at first but soon hundreds of students gathered, bringing gay pride flags and chanting "we have nothing to lose but our chains." [...]

18 months ago 12 comments Read More

Found on Delta State University's school website is a picture of fellow professors Ethan Schmidt and Shannon side by side, smiling at a 2013 holiday party. That same year, Schmidt mentioned Lamb in the acknowledgements of his book "Native Americans in the American Revolution." Now, both professors are dead after Dr. Schmidt was shot in his office at Delta State Monday morning and suspect Lamb died from a self-inflicted wound while evading police, stating he's "not going to jail." Lamb was also a suspect in the earlier homicide of his domestic partner Amy Prentiss, at their home roughly 300 miles south of Delta State. Cleveland Police Chief Charles Bingham claims there is no known motive at the time being - Lamb allegedly believed Prentiss was romantically involved with Schmidt but there is no current evidence of a love triangle. [...]

18 months ago 26 comments Read More

It's move-in day, and some students at the University of South Florida-Saint Petersburg are settling into their new college hotels. Due to housing overflow of upperclassmen at the USFSP campus since 2011, the Hilton has partnered with the university and has made it the permanent Residence Hall Hilton. With amenities such as access to all hotel facilities, weekly linen and cleaning service, as well as other accessories students would otherwise need to bring to the USFSP campus, students are a three-minute drive and eight-minute walk from the campus. However, not all students are pleased with the detached feeling of living away from their peers and campus. [...]

18 months ago 4 comments Read More

We've all heard the phrases, "man up" or "be a man," but what exactly does it mean to be a man? Through the Margaret Cuninggim Women's Center, Vanderbilt University will host "Healthy Masculinities Week." There will be a series of lectures and discussion panels to educate males on the politically correct way to be masculine. Other discussions will include: "Maintaining Bro Status" which investigates issues of masculinity and mental health as they pertain to fraternities, "Masculinity XXL" which addresses the flawed portrayal of manhood in Magic Mike XXL, and "Policing Masculinity in the Gay and Bi Communities." [...]

18 months ago 14 comments Read More

While many people can recall their college days as being "the best days" of their lives, college is never stress-free. From completing last-minute papers, to studying for midterms and finals or dealing with a stressful breakup, students are expected to balance many social, academic and extracurricular responsibilities. For some, there are many positive lessons to be learned from the college experience, but the 2014 National Survey of College Counseling Centers reports a drastic increase in college students with severe psychological problems. Colleges now have trouble keeping up with the demand for mental health services. Up to 83 percent of colleges may deny treatment for students who possess problems beyond the capabilities of the staff. To tackle the issue, Drexel University has taken initiative in reaching out to struggling students by installing mental-health kiosks on campus.

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18 months ago 42 comments Read More

In the midst of Wednesday's tragic shooting and killing of WDBJ7 journalist Alison Parker and cameraman Adam Ward by alleged gunman and former WDBJ-TV reporter Vester Lee Flanagan, Parker's alma mater, James Madison University is accepting donations for the Alison Parker Memorial Scholarship. Similarly, Patrick Henry Community College, where Parker received her associate's degree, is accepting donations for their Alison Bailey Parker Memorial Scholarship. There is an identical scholarship being created for Ward, who graduated from Virginia Tech in 2011. [...]

19 months ago 14 comments Read More

Students are notorious for avoiding summer reading lists – whether they'd rather spend time outdoors or simply find the list dull, many walk into the first day of class without having read the book title. However, incoming freshmen at Duke University are boycotting and refusing to read Alison Bechdel's family tragicomic Fun Home - they claim that the "pornographic" graphic novel conflicts with their Christian morals.

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19 months ago 26 comments Read More

Thought you had adequate privacy on Facebook? Think again. Though there are various privacy settings offered by the social networking website, Harvard University student Aran Khanna, who was scheduled to intern at Facebook's Silicon Valley headquarters in Palo Alto, California, found a major privacy glitch in the Messenger app. As a public service, Khanna created Marauder's Map from his dormitory – an app that used existing data to show the danger in unintentionally sharing data. After a Facebook HR representative had contacted and told him to deactivate the app, as well as avoid talking to the press, Khanna complied and in turn, had his scheduled summer internship rescinded. [...]

19 months ago 5 comments Read More

Despite mass-campus shootings such as Virginia Tech that have the public questioning the safety of college campuses, the U.S. Department found that 93 percent of violence against students occurs off-campus. Currently, approximately 4,400 colleges and universities prohibit carrying firearms. However, states such as Arkansas, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Mississippi, Oregon, Utah and Wisconsin allow concealed guns at some level. Pro-gun movement is rapidly increasing, as evident with the push of the Senate Bill 68 and Florida House Bill 4001, which would permit loaded and concealed arms on campus at Florida State University. Republican Greg Steube and Florida State Senator Greg Evers believe the mere absence of prohibition would lessen gun violence. Additionaly, “a gun-free campus creates a sanctuary campus and safe haven for rapists and criminals,” Steube explained in an interview. Supporters of the legislation believe it upholds the Second Amendment, which grants the right to bear arms, especially for protection purposes. So far the Florida League of Women Voters has opposed the bill and plans to do so again. [...]

19 months ago 52 comments Read More

Lights, camera, backlash. It comes as no surprise that Hollywood films have been criticized for glamorizing violence and criminals - undermining the severity and reality of actual, tragic events. Similarly, there have been multiple occasions where violent movies have been used as inspiration to concoct and devise murder plots. Ideas can come with severe consequences, and recently-filmed "Del Playa," set to release in October already faces condemnation for too closely resembling the 2014 serial murder in Isla Vista, California near the University of California-Santa Barbara. The Huffington Post records an ongoing petition of over 23,000 signatures to change the film's title and donate proceeds to a memorial fund. Kate Nollner, who wrote the petition, claims that the film "intentionally seeks to commoditize the death of six beloved students... it not only justifies the motives behind the Isla Vista gunman, but also glorifies his actions." [...]

19 months ago 3 comments Read More

Is it possible to educate and correct inmates through quality, legitimate prison education? Discussions of social and educational reform, particularly within more decrepit and under-resourced environments are commonplace - but what about when it comes to educating incarcerated individuals? According to the Washington Post, proponents such as Education Secretary Arne Duncan plan to assist those behind bars, particularly through Federal Pell Grants, which averages less than $6,000 a year per student. Through the new Second Chance Pell Pilot program, the goal is to have college and universities providing college-level courses in prions; in turn, inmates would be more educated which would lower prison recidivism rates, as well as community and social violence. It is not clear whether the investment would create a safer society or to what extent it would be effective, and considering its funding source – tax payer dollars - individuals such as U.S. Rep. Chris Collins argue it is a waste since the Pell Grant is a "limited pot of money needed to assist struggling middle-class families." [...]

19 months ago 47 comments Read More

The disease of addiction has ravaged college campuses, evident by the fact that 80 percent of college students drink alcohol, 40 percent binge drink. College students make up one of the largest groups of drug abusers nationwide. Young adolescent’s ages 18-24 already have an increased risk of addiction- those enrolled in a full-time college program are twice as likely to abuse drugs and alcohol. [...]

19 months ago 96 comments Read More

My name is Christina Zhou and as part of my duties as a virtual intern for Scholarships.com I will be writing blog articles each week. Writing is one of my passions and that, combined with the opportunity to help people, was what drew me to this position. Hopefully, the content in these articles will assist student readers everywhere in answering their questions about the college experience. [...]

19 months ago 0 comments Read More

What better way to defy social norms and gender expectations while earning extra credit than by refusing to shave for ten weeks? Female students at Arizona State University are putting public opinion to the test as they refrain from shaving their legs and armpits. To avoid any sexism, males are also permitted to participate, and must shave all body hair from the neck down. Women and Gender Studies Professor Breanne Fahs began the assignment in 2010 as a way to teach students the realities of gender and social expectations, when it comes to physicality and bodily aesthetics. Some "manscaping" or removing excessive bodily hair, is not uncommon - however, complete hair removal is less practiced and Fahs believes it gives greater insight to a woman's tedious hygienic routine. [...]

20 months ago 5 comments Read More
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