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Utilizing Your College’s Resources Effectively

by Lisa Lowdermilk

Do you ever feel frustrated or overwhelmed with the amount of homework you have? Is it impossible to see the light at the end of the tunnel? There are all kinds of resources at your college which can help!

If you're having trouble writing an essay or just want someone to look over your work, the writing lab is there for you. Writing lab tutors are trained to help you with everything from grammar and punctuation to strengthening your argument. They can even help you get started if you feel like you're having a case of the dreaded writer's block.

As the name suggests, math lab tutors can help you with all levels of math. I've even heard of students coming in to learn how to use their graphing calculators. Even as an online student, I have access to the writing lab, math lab and all kinds of services designed to give me feedback from the comforts of my own home.

So many students are reluctant to ask for help because they are worried it will make them seem unintelligent. Don't worry: Asking questions shows that you are conscientious, determined and hard-working. Teachers appreciate students who are curious enough about the material to ask questions.

Even though going to the writing lab or math lab requires you to spend time on your coursework outside of class, you’ll generally be able to schedule one-on-one appointments with tutors to ensure you get the help you need. In my experience, hardly anyone ever came to math lab or writing lab, giving me plenty of opportunities to ask all the questions I wanted.

The best part about these resources is that they're free! You're already paying for college, so why not take advantage of something that won't dip into your savings for a change?

Lisa Lowdermilk is a published poet, avid video gamer and artist. Her poems have appeared in Celebrate Young Poets: West (Fall 2006) edition and Widener University's The Blue Route. She enjoys watching thrillers, trying different restaurants and attempting to breakdance. Lisa is now majoring in professional writing at the University of Colorado Denver.


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Prepping for a Summer Abroad: Financial Edition

by Mariah Proctor

When people hear I’m getting ready to leave on my third study abroad, there are no questions asked – just resentful looks that say ‘Well, aren’t you the cultured little rich girl.’ Okay, maybe the looks aren’t that venomous but the idea holds true. If you are considering studying abroad but think you can’t afford it, listen up: You can.

My first study abroad was paid for in the way many people pay for a pilgrimage to the Holy Land: through money left by my grandparents. There was something tender about imagining my grandfather working hard as a schoolteacher and saving every penny – pennies that would one day take me to Jerusalem. But the inheritance-type funds had run dry when I was asked to go to Southeast Asia for a summer, so my second study abroad saw a more creative, financial-finagling me.

The first step in paying for a semester of international intrigue is finding funding from your home institution. Most international study programs have discount or program-specific scholarships. Also, make sure you fill out the FAFSA to get a Pell grant if you’re eligible. Not everyone knows those government pick-me-ups can be applied to international study...but now you do. Go after one!

There are study abroad-specific scholarships all over the Internet (Scholarships.com is rich with financial opportunities that can be applied). The Phi Kappa Phi Study Abroad Scholarship and the Benjamin A. Gilman Scholarship are two of the most well-known sources of study abroad funding, plus oodles of country-specific and area of study specific-grants.

If you are persistent about diversifying your sources of funding, studying abroad can be less expensive than staying on campus. The most important thing is not to let the cost of a plane ticket or the dollar-to-euro exchange rate scare you away from what will be a fulfilling experiences in your young life. There’s no rule that says only rich kids can travel; if you dream of pyramids or tropical breezes, stop dreaming and start doing. Bonus: Studying abroad provides rich material for grad school application essays.

Mariah Proctor is a senior at Brigham Young University studying theatre arts and German studies. She is a habitual globe-trotter and enjoys acoustic guitar, sunshine and elephant whispering. Once the undergraduate era of her life comes to an end, she plans to perhaps seek a graduate degree in film and television production or go straight to pounding the pavement as an actor and getting used to the sound of slammed doors. Writing has and always will be the constant in her whirlwind life story.


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Don’t Let Cost Dictate Your College Choice

by Mike Sheffey

Choosing your major or school based solely on price is wrong. There are not enough words in the dictionary to describe my disagreement with this logic, but I will try.

First and foremost, college students (and people in general) will fail at things they don’t care about or aren’t excited about. If people choose their school or major based on price, they will likely not be going to the place they want to go or studying what they want to study. That’s not really going to push them to succeed: College costs limit choices and ignores the idea that there are scholarships and other financial aid out there. If you qualify academically for a school, money should not (but unfortunately can) matter.

Another part of this mentality is too much parental control. Guess what, students? You’re adults now. You’re attending college and working on a presence in the real world – don’t let your parents be that invisible hand that pushes you a direction that you don’t want to go. If you choose a major or school they weren’t pushing you to go to, I’m sure your parents will get over it eventually. (If not, too bad: It’s your life.)

If money is the deciding factor, think of this: Your interests are cheapest. Why? Because if you attend school elsewhere or don't major in your preferred field, you won’t be happy and won’t do as well in classes. That could lead to not graduating on time and thus, more money spent. Even if you graduate, give it a few years and you’ll realize that wasn’t what you wanted and going back to school is not cheap. If you follow your interests from the start, you save the money spent on more school or another school. Also, look into the scholarship opportunities you qualify for because I guarantee there are more out there than you think.

My advice? Act on passion and interest, not what others tell you. The minute that money starts steering your life is the minute you risk your future. If you choose a major that you love at a school you love, you won’t regret it.

Mike Sheffey is a senior at Wofford College double majoring in computer science and Spanish. He loves all things music and photography. Mike works for an on-campus sports broadcasting company as well as the music news blog PropertyOfZack.com. He also works with several friends to promote concerts and shows in Greensboro, NC. He hopes to use this blogging position to inform and assist others who are seeking the right college or those currently enrolled in college by providing advice on college life, both in general and specific to Wofford.


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Practical Majors, Passion Projects and Getting the Best of Both Worlds

by Mike Sheffey

Today I’d like to discuss something that I’m positive is constantly on the minds of underclassmen: “What should I major in?” There’s pressure from all ends to do something that makes money but your heart wants to do something you are passionate about. What's a college student to do? Aim for something that has potential to do both. For example, I love music, I love promoting bands, I love going to shows and I love being a part of the music scene in any way that I can. My majors, however, are computer science and Spanish. Those majors paired with my interests may not make sense at first but here’s how I came to this decision:

  • I determined what skills are considered valuable across the board. Spanish is practical in this time period for many reasons. I had the opportunity to study abroad in Chile and got to use my Spanish skills to interview leading punk bands for a research project. In this case, I was able to combine what I was studying with what I was passionate about.
  • I thought outside the box. I am learning computer science so that I may one day combine it with my passion for music. After all, technology, music sharing, music streaming services and apps are the way of the future....so why not use my skills and love for tech towards my passion?

There is no right answer to choosing a major and the idea of a “practical” major (as discussed by Haverford College's dean of academic affairs Phillip Bean in his recent post for The Choice) is subjective, based on personal passion, skills and desires. You just need to be able to say, “Even though I love this, I could still study that,” and get the best of both worlds. This is also a good reason to do thorough research beforehand on what majors your college offers, though most people change their majors a few times or wait a bit to declare.

How have you decided what to major in and did you take your personal passions into consideration?

Mike Sheffey is a junior at Wofford College double majoring in computer science and Spanish. He loves all things music and has recently taken up photography. Mike works for an on-campus sports broadcasting company as well as the music news blog PropertyOfZack.com. He hopes to use this blogging position to inform and assist others who are seeking the right college or those currently enrolled in college by providing advice on college life, both in general and specific to Wofford.


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by Paulina Mis

You will find that, as you go out in search of money to fund your post-secondary education, a lot of questions are going to surface. Naturally, being that we are the largest independent and dedicated resource to scholarships and financial aid on the web, we have a lot of answers. Below, we have a list of some of the most common questions, along with their answers. If you don't find an answer to your question below, check out our Scholarship F.A.Q. page.

  • How can the average student find financial aid for college?

    Students searching for financial aid should begin by filling out a FAFSA and by applying for scholarships. FAFSA submissions can earn students thousands in aid. Many students are worried that their parents’ average income will impede their search for financial aid. That’s not true. Restrictions on availability are not as strict as students think. Even if students are ineligible for free grants, they may receive aid in the form of government loans: these carry much lower interest rates than private loans. Scholarships are another great funding option. There are countless scholarships out there, and many are not merit based. There are the normal, everyday student scholarships, and then there are the downright kooky scholarships. To find both , students can perform a free search at Scholarships.com. With over 2.7 million scholarships, they are bound to find something.
  • Are scholarship searches reliable?

    Some of them are. Naturally, Scholarships.com is not only legit, but also the best way to find the most current information about scholarships. Not only are we on the up-and-up, but we make sure all the awards listed on our site are as well. If they so much as charge an application fee, we don't list them. Students should definitely be wary of services that ask for money. There is no need to pay to for a scholarships search. Scholarship providers are giving money away, not hiding it. Students should also stay away from websites that claim to do all of the work. Most scholarships require students to submit personal information, information that only students will know. Any site that suggests otherwise may be attempting to scam you.
  • Will scholarships affect my eligibility for financial aid?

    They may. The government takes student awards into consideration when offering aid. However, students should not be deterred by this. The effects are not likely to be great. Many schools use student money to offset loan eligibility, not to offset free grant awards. Students who believe they may not be eligible for much aid can benefit greatly by applying for scholarships. Contrary to beliefs of certain celebutantes, more money equals fewer problems.
  • Are graduate students eligible for financial aid?

    Yes and No. Graduate students are eligible to receive money in the form of scholarships, grants, fellowships and assistantships, but they are not eligible for the government Pell Grant. However, graduate students need not worry; there is plenty of non-loan aid out there. Myriad scholarship and outside grant opportunities may be found at Scholarships.com. Many graduates may also receive school grants, fellowships and assistantships; these are usually merit-based. Loans should be used as a last-case resort.
  • My parents have saved for my education; will this affect my eligibility for aid?

    Yes. However, this should not discourage parents and students from saving. Free school grants are capped at $4,300 for the 2007-2008 year. Assuming that students will receive the full amount—many don’t—they may still be lacking. Those who save should set up an account in a guardian’s name. Less than 6% of parents’ assets are considered to be potential college contributions. The percentage increases significantly if students own the money. Parents might want to consider using student money to buy college necessities such as laptops and living extras before submitting their FAFSA.
  • I didn’t receive enough government aid. What can I do?

    You have options. Students who did not receive sufficient aid can try to speak with financial aid administrators. They may be willing to help—especially if a students’ financial situation has recently changed (e.g. job loss or new medical bills). Students may also apply for scholarships and grants, year round. As a last resort, students may apply for loans.
  • How do I know which lender to choose?

    Students who choose to seek out additional aid through loans are likely to find preferred-lender lists at their college. Lists are generally generated based on low interest rates and service quality. However, students should always perform personal research. There have been issues with colleges receiving incentives for placing lenders on preferred-lender lists. When researching, students should compare interest rates, on-time payment benefits, penalty charges and additional fees.
  • What is the difference between loans, grants and scholarships?

    Grants and scholarships are both free monetary awards: they do not need to be repaid. Grants may be offered without service requirements (Pell Grants) or with research requirements (usually the case with graduate students). Scholarships are awards that may be awarded based on merit, talent, major, ethnicity etc. They are not restricted to top students. Plenty of average-student scholarships are out there. Loans need to be repaid, with interest. The government offers the best interest rates on loans. Government guaranteed loans and completely private loans tend to be more expensive.
  • What’s this I hear about 529 Plans and Roth IRAs?

    Students and parents who can put college money aside should take advantage of student savings account tax incentives. Certain accounts are especially created with students in mind. Oftentimes, the deposited money can grow tax-free. Some accounts, though not created for students, offer tax breaks if funds are used for college. The most popular savings account options are the 529 Plan and the Roth IRA. Additional options include the Coverdell and the UTMA.
  • Are there any other things I can do to lower college costs?

    Aside from scholarships, FAFSA, fellowships, and tax breaks, students may consider working. Students who are eligible for Federal Work Study may look into part-time job options. Federal student jobs are usually flexible when it comes to scheduling. Non-federal jobs are usually plentiful on campuses as well. Because there are so many potential workers, the 10 fast-food joints on each block may be willing to accept odd hours if someone is around at all times.
  • Are there any tax incentives for attending college?

    There best known tax incentives are those for 529 savings plans. Many parents don’t realize that there are more breaks out there. The Hope Credit and the Lifetime Learning Credit will allow parents to reap some benefits from this college piggybank drain.
  • How can I increase my chance of landing scholarships?

    There are plenty of ways to increase the chances of winning. One of the best is applying for very specific scholarships. Students are more likely to win if the award is restricted to those within a certain city or major. Scholarships.com helps students find these types of scholarships. Based on profile answers, Scholarships.com can show students a listing of scholarships they are eligible to win.

    To increase the chances of winning, students should also apply early. Some scholarship programs receive submissions from many applicants. Students who apply early are less likely to have applications lost in a pile of submissions. Last but not least, students should remember to pay attention to all regulations. They should only apply for scholarships they are eligible for and should always remember to proofread their work.

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by Paulina Mis

Helping someone is a reward in itself, but I guess college scholarships and grants couldn't hurt. After all, you can't control when good karma decides to stop by with financial aid.

To promote volunteer work and help students who help others, scholarship providers have set up the following volunteer awards:

BR!CK Awards Scholarship

Think of the BR!CK Awards as the Oscars for volunteers. Nine winners who have committed exceptional acts of kindness will receive a scholarship of $5,000 as well as a $5,000 reward to be forwarded to their charity of choice. They will also get to participate in an award show where celebrities present their prizes.

Discover Scholarship Program

This corporate scholarship was created for current high school juniors who have demonstrated accomplishments in community service and leadership, faced a significant challenge and maintained a minimum 2.75 GPA. Up to 10 scholarships of $30,000 each will be granted.

Kohl’s Kids Who Care Scholarship

With the help of this scholarship, student volunteers between the ages of 6 and 18 can earn $5,000 toward their college education. Other prizes include $50 Kohl’s gift certificates and $1,000 scholarships.

A Voice for Animals Scholarship

The Voice for Animals Scholarship, an award provided by the Humane Education Network (HEN) gives students the chance to speak out against animal cruelty. Awards are offered to students who submit the best essays and to those who have worked to improve animal welfare.

Comcast Leaders and Achievers Scholarship

To be eligible for the Comcast Leaders and Achievers Scholarship, high school seniors must first be nominated by their principal. Those who demonstrate leadership skills within the community and who work to engage youth in activities that boost self-esteem and encourage an ethic of service can win $1,000 scholarships.

Jesse Brown Memorial Youth Scholarship Program

The Jesse Brown Memorial Youth Scholarship Program was created in memory of Jesse Brown, a member of the Marine Corp who dedicated his time to assisting disabled American veterans. Students who volunteer at local VA medical centers for a minimum of 100 hours will be able to receive a scholarship from this provider. 

For additional information about volunteering scholarships as well as awards based on different criteria, try conducting a free college scholarship search at Scholarships.com.


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Common Scholarship Myths

April 1, 2008

by Paulina Mis

Numerous students find themselves doubting whether applying for scholarships is really worth their time.  They assume that competition is tough and that most applicants have an exceptional academic record—not true. It’s in a student’s best interest to maximize his/her financial aid potential by giving scholarships a shot. Check out some common scholarship misconceptions below before passing up valuable options.   1. All scholarship contests are competitive—There is no denying that a few national scholarship competitions can be difficult to win. Certain corporations go out of their way to advertise their philanthropic actions, and they create very minimal eligibility criteria to encourage students to apply. However, millions of scholarships are available, and most are neither well-advertised nor open to every student.

Try searching for awards you are eligible to receive based on strict criteria. If you’re a Chicagoan and you find an award available only to high school seniors residing in Illinois, go for it. Remember, the competitors are just as intimidated by you as you are by them. Don’t give up before you start.   2. Applying for scholarships will reduce federal student aid eligibility— A number of students worry about federal aid reductions resulting from scholarship winnings. Let’s set the record straight. According to Federal Student Aid representatives, Pell Grant awards will not be reduced because of scholarships. It is, however, possible for schools to limit certain loan eligibility or to reduce school scholarship offers. But unless you’re expecting a full ride from Harvard, you have nothing to worry about. Even if you are, the effects will be minimal, if any.   3. It’s easier to work for the money—Yes, you are pretty much guaranteed a paycheck when you work, but working is not the easiest way to find money for college. Student jobs are a great source of supplementary income, but, realistically, a student paycheck is unlikely to cover tuition. Plus, scholarships and jobs are not mutually exclusive. If you have the chance to win $3,000 by spending three or four hours typing away, take advantage of it. You may have to work an entire summer for that money. Even if you don’t win, the few hours won’t destroy your social life.


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by Paulina Mis

You’ve seen them before, the shiny cars standing in the mall, the slot boxes covered in pictures of dollar bills and palm trees. That’s right, they’re sweepstakes—easy money. Unlike most scholarship essays, sweepstakes involve little to no effort. Requirements may be as minute as an email or a postal address.

Sweepstakes are definitely a breeze, but they are a competitive breeze. Just about everything that entails little work and big money is. The young and old love sweepstakes like a kid loves cake. Some become addicted, spending hours on end rummaging through sites in search of contest opportunities.

While students should by no means rely solely on their luck to fund college, legitimate contests may be worth a shot. Someone will win the prize, and you just may be that lucky someone. For college sweepstakes that may help you afford an education, check out the links below. To find college scholarships and grants that are a bit more reliable, try conducting a free college scholarship search

Scholarships.com "Tell A Friend" $1,000 Sweepstakes (New Winners Announced Every Three Months!)

Coca-Cola & Chuck E. Cheese’s $25,000 College Scholarship Sweepstakes

Academic Finance Corporation (AFC) $50K Giveaway Scholarship Sweepstakes

SuntTrust Off to College Scholarship Sweepstakes

Wells Fargo CollegeSTEPS Program & Scholarship Sweepstakes

$100,000 Oxy Cash for College Sweepstakes

TI-84 Plus Silver Edition Prep for College Sweepstakes

What’s Your Freedom Quotient Sweepstakes


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College Fellowships

April 14, 2008

by Paulina Mis

Because graduate and professional school students are no longer eligible for Pell Grants, they must search elsewhere for financial assistance. A common option is the fellowship--a financial aid opportunity created to help graduate students obtain their degree.

Master, doctoral and professional school candidates who demonstrate both merit and dedication are the most common recipients of fellowships. When searching for this type of aid, students are unlikely to come across awards that mirror the goofy, unusual duck tape outfit or left-handed student scholarships. More often than not, fellowships are geared towards students who are serious about their work—ones who display resolve and passion in their respective fields. They are commonly awarded to individuals who plan to conduct research in a certain field or to ones who plan to begin a career in a subject designated by the fellowship provider.

Below are a few examples of fellowship opportunities you may be eligible to receive. Many awards are conferred annually, so check back for updated deadlines. For additional information about financial aid options, try conducting a free college scholarship search.

AACC International Fellowship

The foundation previously known as the American Association of Cereal Chemists (AACC) is awarding fellowships in the amounts of $2,000, $2,500 and $3,000 to students who conduct research directly related to grain-based food science or technology. Students must be pursuing an MS or Ph.D. degree to be eligible.

Department of Homeland Security Fellowship

Tuition, fees and a stipend of $2,300 per month for 12 months will be awarded to graduate students whose thesis deals with science, technology, engineering or math as they relate to homeland security. Applicants must be US citizens and must have a minimum 3.3 GPA on a 4.0 scale.

Richard Morris Hunt Fellowship

Architects pursuing a career in historic preservation may be eligible to win $25,000 in stipend money. Winners from France and the US will practice preservation technologies in each other’s countries over a six month span.

Fellowship for Minority Doctoral Students

The American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) will award fellowships to minority doctoral students who display potential for becoming accounting educators. Renewable fellowships of up to $12,000 will be given away each year. 

American Graduate Fellowships

Students working towards a doctoral degree in the humanities and attending one of the 23 leading independent research universities in the U.S., Great Britain or Ireland may be eligible to receive a fellowship of up to $50,000. History, philosophy, literature, languages and the fine arts are among eligible fields


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by Paulina Mis

As far as we know, there isn’t one. Let’s begin by addressing your first question: if there is no catch, who's paying for this, and what's their work incentive? The answer is FlatWorld, and, if things go right for the new company, guidebooks, work materials and requests for in-print versions will be sufficient to cover labor costs and to generate profits.

Since 2007, FlatWorld has been crafting their innovative idea, and it plans to make services available to the public by 2009. The diversity of their textbook selections and the facility of their use will largely determine the success of their new venture, but students aware of FlatWorld will probably, at the very least, check out their site. According to The Chronicle of Higher Education, the average college student spends over $900 on textbooks—annually. Being able to pocket a good chunk of that money will significantly alleviate financial burdens caused by increasing college rates.

Electronic book versions are not exactly new, and companies less geared towards college students dealing with unregulated textbook costs have already offered similar services. Electronic books in general are growing in popularity, especially the fee-based ones. If you’ve done some Amazon shopping or people watched on the train in recent months, you’re probably familiar with the new Amazon electronic reading device. It’s catching on quickly, but, truth be told, there’s just something about physically holding a piece paper. As much as I love branches, I couldn’t help but print out class articles en masse during finals week, ones I could have easily browsed online. (In my defense, I did fit four pages on one sheet.) The ability to quickly scribble a note, double star a sentence or circle a key word just makes the learning process more interactive and complete.

Still, I’m willing to bet that dishing out $120 for a textbook that can’t be resold due to future edition changes can make a little inconvenience worthwhile. Most money management tactics can. And FlatWorld is doing its best to make up in ease what they lose in “that special something”. By making their texts editable to both students and the professors who assign them, they have made their options a bit more user friendly and appealing. Readers can even interact with each other during the reading process—I smell an attractive cliff note opportunity.  Dragging your desktop to the quad may be a bit of a pain, but being able to afford vacation time may give you an incentive.


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