News Articles About Financial Aid


Scenario: Your dream school is beyond state boundaries but your college fund is more suited to a college closer to home. Don't fret: If you know what and where you want to study, you could score an impressive tuition break through a regional discount program. Here's the breakdown:

Head Out of State for an In-State Price

July 27, 2011
by Alexis Mattera
Scenario: Your dream school is beyond state boundaries but your college fund is more suited to a college closer to home. Don't fret: If you know what and where you want to study, you could score an
Being a college student has a lot of perks in terms of accessible facilities, discounts and resources. Here are a few tips on what to take advantage of while you’re a student:

Amazon Prime. The power of a dot edu email address is amazing and here’s a great way to get a top-notch service for free for a year. Amazon Prime gives you free two-day shipping on eligible products and one-day shipping for $3.99. This is a sweet deal and I’ve used mine up already on my textbooks for the past two semesters. After the introductory year is up, you get a discounted rate of $39/year down from the original $79/year.

The gym. Membership to your university’s gym is probably included in your tuition and fees anyway. You may as well get up off your butt and use their facilities and sport-specific courts like racquetball, tennis and basketball. Exercise hard and live easy. 

The student health center. Hooray for potentially cheap healthcare! The doctor might not always be there but someone will help you when Mom is what seems like a million miles away.

Student movie tickets. If you and your date want to go out to a movie, a student ticket can save you a few bucks at the box office. Now you can spring for popcorn!

Advisors. Universities are full of advisors specific to your major. If you don’t have a major, chances are good there’s someone who can help you choose one. Advisors have experience working with people like you and can assist you with everything from course selection to financial aid and it’s not like the general public can use them!

Discounts on big-name computer software and hardware. Things like Microsoft Office, anti-virus software, Photoshop and Apple products all usually have some kind of discount for students. Cash in!

I hope some of you have ideas to add, too. Feel free to comment!

Discounts to Take Advantage of While in College

July 26, 2011
by Aaron Lin
Being a college student has a lot of perks in terms of accessible facilities, discounts and resources. Here are a few tips on what to take advantage of while you’re a student: Amazon Prime. The
	
Community service is something most of us have done at one point or another. For some high schools, it’s a graduation requirement but I believe serving your community is vital whether it’s mandated or not. The good news for college students is that not only does community service help others but it can also translate into money for school.

Lending a Helping Hand Pays Off

July 26, 2011
by Shari Williams
Community service is something most of us have done at one point or another. For some high schools, it’s a graduation requirement but I believe serving your community is vital whether it’s

According to a study by the National Center for Education Statistics, it costs approximately $80,000 in tuition plus expenses to earn a bachelor’s degree from a public four-year college and about $140,000 to gain the same credentials from a private nonprofit four-year institution. There are certainly ways to find this kind of funding – grants, student loans and, hello, scholarships! – but will your major of choice be worth the money? If you select one of the fields included on PayScale’s list of best-paying college majors, it is decidedly so.

PayScale’s Best-Paying College Majors

July 26, 2011
by Alexis Mattera
According to a study by the National Center for Education Statistics, it costs approximately $80,000 in tuition plus expenses to earn a bachelor’s degree from a public four-year college and about

The first day of classes means new professors, new classmates and a completely new routine. It is also about the time that universities distribute refund checks to students. Refund checks are extra funds that are left over after all school fees have been paid. These funds are the result of excess scholarships, grants and loans. Refund checks can come in handy, as students can use the extra money to buy a laptop, food, books or to pay off another loan. Some students, however, are not wise with their money and are left scrounging for pennies before the end of the semester.

Rationing Your Refund Check

July 25, 2011
by Jessica Seals
The first day of classes means new professors, new classmates and a completely new routine. It is also about the time that universities distribute refund checks to students. Refund checks are extra

With the soaring prices of college tuition, most college students are trying to get the biggest bang for their buck when paying for school. One way they’re doing this? Having more than one major or minor.

Double Your Potential with a Double Major or Minor

July 15, 2011
by Jacquelene Bennett
With the soaring prices of college tuition, most college students are trying to get the biggest bang for their buck when paying for school. One way they’re doing this? Having more than one major or

When the recession hit in 2008, higher education officials wondered how – not if – enrollment numbers would be impacted. Three years later, the damage has been revealed...and it’s not what anyone anticipated.

The Recession: College’s Sorting Hat?

July 14, 2011
by Alexis Mattera
When the recession hit in 2008, higher education officials wondered how – not if – enrollment numbers would be impacted. Three years later, the damage has been revealed...and it’s not what anyone

Did you know that more than 70 colleges across the country have replaced loans with grants? That’s right: Schools are offering more free money to entice students to enter their hallowed halls, meaning they will not be saddled with the often-dreaded student loan payments after graduation. What institutions come out on top? Here are a few of the best aid policies, courtesy of the Washington Post’s Daniel de Vise:

Princeton University: The Tigers lead the pack time wise, first cutting loans in 1998 and nixing them completely in 2001.

Harvard University: After eliminating loans in 2008, Harvard implemented a “zero to 10” standard, which pledges families earning up to $180,000 will pay 10 percent of their income at most toward college-related fees.

Amherst College: The school replaced loans with grants and work-study for all students in Fall 2008 and the number of students eligible for Pell grants has nearly doubled to 23 percent as a result.

Claremont McKenna and Pomona: Loans were also phased out here in 2008 but not just to help poor students. Roger Huddle, a rising Pomona senior with a household income approaching $100,000, received enough aid to cover roughly two-thirds of the full cost of attendance.

Yale University: The New Haven-based Ivy meets full demonstrated need without loans, capping the contribution at 10 percent of income for families earning up to $130,000.

The Best Financial Aid Policies in Higher Ed

July 13, 2011
by Alexis Mattera
Did you know that more than 70 colleges across the country have replaced loans with grants? That’s right: Schools are offering more free money to entice students to enter their hallowed halls,

There’s good news and bad news regarding state aid for students. The good: State financial aid for college students, including grants, work-study and loans, rose by nearly 4 percent last year. The bad: Just about half of the states surveyed cut need-based grants, even as demand for financial aid increased.

The Good News and Bad News About State Aid for Students

July 11, 2011
by Alexis Mattera
There’s good news and bad news regarding state aid for students. The good: State financial aid for college students, including grants, work-study and loans, rose by nearly 4 percent last year. The
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