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Building a Resume While in School

March 27, 2013

Building a Resume While in School

by Chelsea Slaughter

We all know that school is hard sometimes but life after graduation can be much harder if you do not do what’s necessary to stand apart from the crowd. When graduating high school and entering college, you will find many opportunities to enter academic and social organizations, most of which will require application processes that ask about your involvement and leadership skills. Realizing you don’t have much on your resume? No worries: You still have time.

First, find a club that interests you and join it. And don’t just be a member – run for a position, ANY position. This shows leadership and adds an extra line on your resume while showing you have ambition and drive different from students who are just members. Another good way to build a resume is through volunteer work. Spending extra time doing community service is a great way to gain experience AND give back.

When it comes to building a resume in college, the small minimum wage jobs really do not count. After graduation, companies want to see what you have done to gain hands-on skills. Most degrees require students to do at least one internship; this usually takes place during junior year but don't be afraid to get a head start in your freshman or sophomore years...or both! Also, try joining academic and community service-based organizations – this will help to encounter great opportunities that you might not find on your own.

Remember that employers look beyond just good grades: They want to be able to see that you have put yourself out in other activities and can handle multiple responsibilities. If you spend your free time wisely and productively, you will definitely thank yourself later.

Chelsea Slaughter is currently a junior at Jacksonville State University majoring in communications (public relations concentration) and minoring in art. She serves as a resident assistant on campus, is the treasurer in the Public Relations Organization and is an active member in W.I.S.E., NAACP and Omicron Delta Kappa Honors Leadership Society. She aims to work in the entertainment industry post-graduation and is well on her way thanks to an internship with a digital marketer to several music artists. Chelsea strives to achieve all of her goals and motivate others along the way.

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Staying Healthy on Campus

March 6, 2013

Staying Healthy on Campus

by Chelsea Slaughter

The “freshman 15” is not a myth: It’s more of a warning because the “freshman 15” can easily escalate into the “freshman 20-40.” Adjusting to a new campus and a new meal plan can really have dramatic effect on your body...but only if you let it.

Most dining halls offer a plethora of choices. There's pizza, fries and burgers (oh my!) but consider reaching for smarter alternatives like salads, grilled chicken wraps and steamed vegetables. There is nothing wrong with indulging but just do it in moderation. It’s so easy to overeat when unlimited food is in your face every day – try to keep up balanced meals to help your body stay centered.

Being healthy is also about staying active. Check out your athletic center and see what it have to offer. Many campus gyms include cardio rooms with treadmills, ellipticals and stationary bikes; there are also rooms and equipment for weight training...and it’s all free of charge or already included in your campus fees! If you need a bit more motivation to work out, most campuses offer group exercise classes. (I personally enjoy step aerobics on Tuesdays and Thursdays and Zumba on Mondays and Wednesdays.)

The gym isn’t for everyone so remember that your small efforts add up. Walk to classes instead of driving or taking the shuttle. Toss the Frisbee around on the quad with your roommates or play basketball in the park. It’s not so much what you do, it’s that you do something!

Staying healthy does not have to be expensive or hard – it’s mainly about making smart choices. Don’t let that “freshman 15” sneak up on you!

Chelsea Slaughter is currently a junior at Jacksonville State University majoring in communications (public relations concentration) and minoring in art. She serves as a resident assistant on campus, is the treasurer in the Public Relations Organization and is an active member in W.I.S.E., NAACP and Omicron Delta Kappa Honors Leadership Society. She aims to work in the entertainment industry post-graduation and is well on her way thanks to an internship with a digital marketer to several music artists. Chelsea strives to achieve all of her goals and motivate others along the way.

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Student Social Media Etiquette

February 27, 2013

Student Social Media Etiquette

by Chelsea Slaughter

Social media gives us what we feel like is a platform to express our thoughts and feelings on any issue around us. We can connect to people we know (or may not know) globally with ease but we must be cautious about what we say and what we post on these open sites. Your platform for free speech can either help or harm you.

If you check Scholarships.com’s blog regularly, you read a post about a college student who was expelled because of what he posted on Facebook. A lot of students may think “Wow, that’s crazy. That could never happen to me.” But in fact, it can! When posting on your favorite sites, keep these dos and don’ts in mind:

  • DO try and connect to people you may not have a chance to meet sans social media. (i.e., people you look up to, international students, etc.)
  • DON’T post anything you would not want your parents, professors or employers to see. These days, employers and college officials will often use social media as an extension of your resume to give them a better idea of who you are as a person.
  • DO keep a clean, PG profile. Untag yourself in any compromising posts or photos.
  • DON’T assume that since your page is private, it cannot be seen. There are plenty of ways to bypass such “protection” that you may not be aware of.
  • DO separate yourself from situations that could involve drama or negativity.
  • DON’T say anything about someone or something that you would not say in front of them. One of the main causes of lost friendships and peer conflicts is based off of social media.

Your social media accounts are a direct representation of you. Make sure the image presented is one you can be proud to call yours!

Chelsea Slaughter is currently a junior at Jacksonville State University majoring in communications (public relations concentration) and minoring in art. She serves as a resident assistant on campus, is the treasurer in the Public Relations Organization and is an active member in W.I.S.E., NAACP and Omicron Delta Kappa Honors Leadership Society. She aims to work in the entertainment industry post-graduation and is well on her way thanks to an internship with a digital marketer to several music artists. Chelsea strives to achieve all of her goals and motivate others along the way.

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Important Tips for Staying Organized

March 14, 2013

Important Tips for Staying Organized

by Chelsea Slaughter

Whether you are applying to or already attending college, organization is key to staying on the right track. It’s always important to keep up with important files and papers concerning your academic path but how helpful is that if you cannot find what you need when you need it? Organizing can be simple and easy if you know how to do it!

The first thing you must do is get the right supplies and binders, dividers, labels and pocket folders are always a great start. For high school seniors, keeping a binder of all required paperwork will help you stay focused on graduation goals and college application necessities. SAT/ACT scores, college entrance essays, scholarship applications and student transcripts can all be properly filed for easy access, making the application process quick and simple.

Keep this process up in college. Make sure you obtain and file away copies of everything from the school, your adviser, etc., just in case of an unfortunate mishap. (Technology is great but not foolproof!) A binder with dividers works here as well but if you don’t have three-hole puncher, pocket folders will do. You may need to refer back to these college documents and it’s easier when you know exactly where to look.

These rules also apply to your studies! Even when a neatly organized binder isn’t required on the syllabus, it should be considered anyway. Date all of your notes, tests, quizzes, essays and assignments – this makes filing much easier and when you need to remove something, you will always know where to put it back. Organizing your classwork, notes and grades will help you focus on your progress and meet your goals.

These tips may be seem repetitive but they really do make a difference! Student life can get so hectic and without proper organization, it’s easy to lose track of what’s important.

Chelsea Slaughter is currently a junior at Jacksonville State University majoring in communications (public relations concentration) and minoring in art. She serves as a resident assistant on campus, is the treasurer in the Public Relations Organization and is an active member in W.I.S.E., NAACP and Omicron Delta Kappa Honors Leadership Society. She aims to work in the entertainment industry post-graduation and is well on her way thanks to an internship with a digital marketer to several music artists. Chelsea strives to achieve all of her goals and motivate others along the way.

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Having Fun on a Budget

February 20, 2013

Having Fun on a Budget

by Chelsea Slaughter

Being on your own at school really makes you appreciate the little things in life. There are so many things we took for granted because we never had to pay for them and being in college teaches you how to prioritize your time and money. It’s good to remember that having fun doesn’t have to kill your pockets – be wise and learn how to have fun on a budget!

Have you checked your school activity calendar? Find the different events your school is holding, grab some friends and GO! The majority of on-campus events provide free food, music and a chance to get to know your fellow students. Don’t pass up the chance to interact with campus leaders; you could wind up planning the next event!

Constructive fun is sometimes the best fun to have. Have you considered volunteering? Why many may think there is no way to have fun while volunteering baffles me. Like to build? Find a local Habitat for Humanity project and help create a home for the less fortunate. Love working with children? Volunteer at your local YMCA and help out with after-school programs. There are many opportunities out there so turn your extra time in to amazing fun that can even build your resume.

Get active! While Netflix and Redbox movie nights with friends are always enjoyable, don’t be afraid to get out and move around a little. Create an intramural team with some friends for your favorite sport. Don’t feel athletic enough? Hit the park with some friends and a Frisbee, volleyball or tennis raquets. Pack a lunch and spend the day outside enjoying the weather!

While movies, malls and parties are the “norm” in terms of college fun, consider the cheaper alternatives. The more you save every weekend, the more funds you will have for important matters!

Chelsea Slaughter is currently a junior at Jacksonville State University majoring in communications (public relations concentration) and minoring in art. She serves as a resident assistant on campus, is the treasurer in the Public Relations Organization and is an active member in W.I.S.E., NAACP and Omicron Delta Kappa Honors Leadership Society. She aims to work in the entertainment industry post-graduation and is well on her way thanks to an internship with a digital marketer to several music artists. Chelsea strives to achieve all of her goals and motivate others along the way.

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Spring Break Planning Tips & Advisement

February 13, 2013

Spring Break Planning Tips & Advisement

by Chelsea Slaughter

We’re midway through February, which means it’s the perfect time to get your spring break plans in order! How will you spend your time off? Here are a few suggestions:

If you plan to travel, check out sites like StudentCity.com for information on Panama City, South Padre Island and other popular destinations. Take time to research different cities and their respective attractions but keep in mind that the sooner you finalize your plans, the cheaper your trip will be. You should also decide who you travel with (a responsible group of friends you can trust is key) and how you will get around (if you are not driving to your destination, realize you’ll have to walk, cab or take public transit once you’re there).

A vacation is not the only way to spend your spring break, as many universities have alternate spring programs that include volunteering with Habitat for Humanity and other organizations. If your school does not offer a program like this, check out UnitedWay.org to find an alternate spring break trip that suits you. You’ll be able to experience a new place while volunteering and helping the community: This year, they have one in Newark, NJ to help families rebuild after Hurricane Sandy.

Another idea could be a short-term internship. I spent my first spring break job shadowing a digital marketer in the entertainment industry and it was a great way to build my resume and get hands-on experience for a future career. Work hard and you could score an internship or job for the summer!

Spring break can be whatever you want it to be but the key element is planning. Don’t wait until the last moment; if you have nothing planned yet, then it’s time to get started!

Chelsea Slaughter is currently a junior at Jacksonville State University majoring in communications (public relations concentration) and minoring in art. She serves as a resident assistant on campus, is the treasurer in the Public Relations Organization and is an active member in W.I.S.E., NAACP and Omicron Delta Kappa Honors Leadership Society. She aims to work in the entertainment industry post-graduation and is well on her way thanks to an internship with a digital marketer to several music artists. Chelsea strives to achieve all of her goals and motivate others along the way.

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Meet Scholarships.com's Virtual Interns: Chelsea Slaughter

February 6, 2013

Meet Scholarships.com's Virtual Interns: Chelsea Slaughter

by Chelsea Slaughter

Hello Scholarships.com readers! My name is Chelsea Slaughter and I am a junior at Jacksonville State University in Jacksonville, AL. I am majoring in public relations with a minor in art. I did not start off as a public relations major, however: I started off as a graphic design major. I love art and I just knew that it was what I wanted to do with my life after college but as it turned out, I was wrong.

Ever have a hobby that you loved to do in your free time and then you’re forced to do it and it becomes a chore? Well, that’s what happened with me. I didn’t want to draw or design for fun anymore so during the second semester of my freshman year, I decided to change to public relations. I had been doing music promotions on a street team and realized I was really good at it and I made my minor art because I still have passion for it. College is all about learning more about yourself and what suits you. I am very happy I decided to change my major as early as I did!

In my spare time, I enjoy the simple things. I make jewelry, hang with my friends and family and I’m an avid concertgoer, often traveling to see some of my favorite artists perform. I’m very active on campus, maintain a job as a resident assistant and am a member of organizations such as NAACP and Public Relations Organization. As an RA in a freshman dorm, I see first-hand the difficulties that incoming freshmen have to deal with. This is why I wanted to be a Scholarships.com virtual intern: I have gone through the same things and have learned from them. From my experience and knowledge, I feel like I can help many college students facing similar obstacles.

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Taking Advantage of New Opportunities After a Semester Abroad

July 26, 2012

Taking Advantage of New Opportunities After a Semester Abroad

by Darci Miller

So you’re back from your semester abroad and you’re pumped to jump right back into your American life. Of course, you’d rather be gallivanting across Europe like you’ve been doing for the past few months but thinking about returning to your old activities makes you inexplicably happy...until you find that school is as different a place as you are a person.

Unfortunately, time didn’t stop and wait for you to return stateside. Your five months away changed you as much as it changed the place you’re returning to. Suddenly, your previous leadership positions are no longer available and you’re facing a bit of a crisis.

First of all, don’t panic! If you’re worried about what this gap in your resume will look like to an employer, don’t. The fact that you studied abroad has the potential to look just as valuable as any job experience. If marketed correctly, it can display your growth as a person, exposure to new cultures and whatever new skills you may have picked up.

While falling right back into your old routine might’ve been nice, life is always changing and this situation is no different. Now’s the time to reprioritize...and take advantage! I myself lost my editorial position on the school newspaper – kind of unfortunate, yes, but this gives me the chance to go back to being a writer and take on more responsibilities elsewhere. New internships, anyone?

This is, I think, the key: Don’t look at it as a loss but rather as the universe giving you a reminder that a trip abroad isn’t the only way to explore new things. It’s okay to miss your old job just like it’s okay to miss your old haunts and routines from your semester abroad. But if you look at this as an opportunity, it could bring tons of good things your way.

Darci Miller is a New Yorker studying journalism and sport administration at the University of Miami. When she’s not writing for the school newspaper, you can find her at the gym, either working or working out. She loves all ‘80s pop culture (the cheesier, the better!) and glues herself to her TV when the Olympics are on. She dreams big and believes the sky’s the limit.

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How to Maximize Your Experience When You Have Minimal Time

August 21, 2012

How to Maximize Your Experience When You Have Minimal Time

by Darci Miller

It’s that time again, folks: Summer is ending and we’re all lugging all our stuff back to our dorm rooms for another year of school. After reuniting with your friends, everyone asks how your summer was and how that internship went. Wait...what internship? While others swap stories about impossible assignments, "constructive criticism" and weird bosses, you sit there awkwardly and silently swear to yourself that you’re going to put your nose to the grindstone this semester. No opportunity will be passed up and your resume will look absolutely glorious.

Hang on. Between classes, clubs, a job, potential internships and – oh yeah! – a social life and maybe some sleep, you’re left with less than five hours in the day. Oops...but don’t fret: It's possible if you know how to work the system. And, luckily for you, some of us already do.

Internships are a must to add to your resume before you leave college but if you’re attending school/living in a small city with few opportunities, don’t have a car and have to rely on unreliable public transit, etc., this can be a super difficult task. Solution? Go virtual! Virtual (or remote) internships are THE best way to get experience in a time-efficient way. You can work from anywhere there’s a computer with Internet access and you often get to make your own schedule. Take it from someone who’s had four remote positions already – you’re going to want to look into virtual internships as an option.

While internships are great, you’re obviously going to want a job to pad your bank account a bit, right? Nothing fancy is necessary so your first stops should absolutely be on campus. Places like the library, gym and all academic departments all need students to work for them and they’re in walking distance from your dorm and/or classes. Less travel time means more time spent doing something productive, so take advantage. Another HUGE plus? On-campus jobs are often really good about letting you do homework while on shift. Multitasking at its finest and yet another way to free up more of your day!

The key here is to be as efficient as possible with your time. Use it as productively as you can, overlap tasks and travel, and you’re good to go. Now stop procrastinating and get to work!

Darci Miller is a New Yorker studying journalism and sport administration at the University of Miami. When she’s not writing for the school newspaper, you can find her at the gym, either working or working out. She loves all ‘80s pop culture (the cheesier, the better!) and glues herself to her TV when the Olympics are on. She dreams big and believes the sky’s the limit.

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Life After Study Abroad

Lessen Reverse Culture Shock with These Easy Tips

July 5, 2012

Life After Study Abroad

by Darci Miller

When preparing for your semester abroad, you’re bombarded with advice – bring this amount of clothes, make sure to see these cities, make sure to experience the culture of your new country, etc. – but what about when you go home? I spent five months living in London and becoming pseudo-British. What was I left with when I returned to the U.S.? A strong affinity for tea, thousands of pictures and no idea how to deal.

Reverse culture shock was almost as scary as culture shock itself. I went from the Tube to the subway, chips to French fries, looking left when crossing the road to looking right, a flat to a house and (most jarringly) life in a big city to life in a suburb. I can no longer see Olympic Stadium from my bedroom window and my friends are scattered across continents. Life in America seemed incredibly unappealing.

What really helped me has been keeping some of the habits I picked up in London the same. A group of friends and I still send Facebook messages instead of texting, I still drink tea every night before I go to bed, and I still keep my Oyster card in my wallet. Blogging about everything while the feelings and memories were still fresh was very cathartic and a quick glance at photos never goes amiss. These things remind me that, while I’m not physically there anymore, studying abroad HAS changed me: I’ll never be the same as I was before I went...and that’s okay.

At the same time, jumping back into home life is very important. Don’t give yourself time to be too sad: find a job, restart a hobby, reconnect with old friends. Is there something you’ve wanted to do for a while but haven’t gotten around to it? Now’s the perfect time! Getting excited about things you’re doing at home make the sting of no longer being abroad much more tolerable.

If you were happy at home once, you can be again – you just have to figure out how to make it happen for the new, world-traveling you. But you do have to look the country-appropriate way when crossing the road. There’s really no getting around that one!

Darci Miller is a New Yorker studying journalism and sport administration at the University of Miami. When she’s not writing for the school newspaper, you can find her at the gym, either working or working out. She loves all ‘80s pop culture (the cheesier, the better!) and glues herself to her TV when the Olympics are on. She dreams big and believes the sky’s the limit.

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