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Catholic University’s Single-Sex Dorm Reform

by Anna Meskishvili

Last week, Catholic University president John Garvey announced that beginning with this upcoming academic year, all dormitories would be single-sex. The university based this decision on reported studies that students living in co-ed environments are more likely to engage in binge drinking as well as hooking up.

Garvey emphasizes that within co-ed environments, gender roles get blurred and women try to “outdrink” men, which can only lead to harmful situations. From reckless drinking comes reckless behavior such as unprotected sex, which is more easily accessible in a co-ed dorm. If his changes are instituted, Garvey claims this is all less likely to occur.

This change in housing is not passing without some strong opposition. John F. Banzhaf, a law professor at George Washington University, claims that this may even be illegal because it violates the District of Columbia’s Human Rights Act, which prohibits discrimination in housing based on sex, race, religion and other factors.

Through my own experience living in single-sex and co-ed dorms, I can tell you that boys will be boys and girls will be girls. No matter what environment you place 300 18-year-olds in, they will be as reckless as they choose to be. In fact, as stated in a CNN article about the matter, many women do their heaviest drinking while with other women and boys tend to “bro-out” with their guy friends and binge drink; therefore, separating the two groups will likely not change their initiative to engage in alcohol consumption.

From my experience living in an all-girls dorm, all the female interaction leads to cliques, cattiness and bullying; this is much less likely to occur when there are boys present to dilute the female egos. Being in single-sex dorms makes it harder to branch out and ultimately does not benefit the students living there. What do you think? Do you think that eliminating common ground between boys and girls in dorms will eliminate the problems Garvey cites, too?

Anna Meskishvili is a rising senior at Boston University pursuing a degree in public relations at the College of Communication and hopes to someday work in healthcare administration communication. She is part of Kappa Delta at BU and has loved every second of it. She is also involved in Public Relations Student Society of America and Ed on Campus. Anna was born in the Republic of Georgia and considers herself a citizen of the world because she’s lived in Russia, England, France, Brooklyn and Connecticut. She loves to travel, run and learn.


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Living on a Budget

June 17, 2011

Living on a Budget

by Anna Meskishvili

Ah, college living. Welcome to the life of Ramen, Groupon deals and at-home-manicures.

Attending school in a city, I have a lot of unforeseen spending like cab fares and impromptu coffee stops. Here are some tips on how to maintain a livable and realistic budget when you start school:

Eat at the dining hall. Dining halls don’t get enough credit. They are the best way to save at least $25 a week on one of the biggest areas of spending for college kids – food. To make a mundane cafeteria meal more fun, plan a dinner with your friends. If and when you do go out, get a doggy bag – great late-night snack or lunch the next day!

Stay in. It’s the seventh Friday of the semester and you and your friends are getting ready to cab your way ($6 each way per person) to the frat house ($5 at the door) to have a mediocre time...like you’ve been doing every week. The whole night will cost you about $20 and a jungle juice stained top, so why not save some cash and stay in? I’m not saying don’t be social but one night in with a movie and a $10 pizza for you and three friends can be a good time for less.

Make trades. Imagine having access to 10 fully-stocked closets. That’s the beauty of living in a dorm: You have the ability to share clothes and make new friends. If you’re nice about it, that cute girl down the hall will let you borrow that expensive top for your hot date. Take advantage but be responsible!

Living on a strict budget is not easy but grinding through it can be fun! Every time I make myself a bowl of Ramen, I am happy to know it only set me back $.19.

Anna Meskishvili is a rising senior at Boston University pursuing a degree in public relations at the College of Communication and hopes to someday work in healthcare administration communication. She is part of Kappa Delta at BU and has loved every second of it. She is also involved in Public Relations Student Society of America and Ed on Campus. Anna was born in the Republic of Georgia and considers herself a citizen of the world because she’s lived in Russia, England, France, Brooklyn and Connecticut. She loves to travel, run and learn.


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A "Beyond" Helpful Campus Shopping Guide

by Anna Meskishvili

Anyone who has ever seen the movie “Click” can think back to the opening scenes when Adam Sandler is at Bed Bath & Beyond. Walking into this massive space of shelves, vacuums, table settings and rugs can be beyond overwhelming (see what I did there?) but here are some pointers on managing your pre-frosh trip to this and other home supply utopias.

Storage. Four words: Under-the-bed containers. These plastic trunks can hold up to one season’s worth of clothes...and I invested in three! But what if you have a lofted bed – the bunk bed type with a desk underneath? Purchase a few Space Bags to minimize the space used for clothes you don’t need and hang them in your closet. I am still trying to wrap my mind around how they can make a down comforter the size of a magazine but they do!

Hygiene. It’s shocking how easily a small space like a dorm can become completely filthy so if there is one thing you MUST walk out with from any home goods store, it’s a Shark Vacuum. These wild things are small, won’t take up living space and clean carpets like no other. Also, don’t forget a shower caddy! You do not want to be that girl who realizes she forgot her conditioner while already in the shower.

Dining In. There will be nights where you will opt out of going to the dining hall in favor of a fancy microwave dinner. Warning: Back away from the kitchenware section! You do not need fine china for your dorm room; invest in only a few plates, bowls, forks, knives and spoons. They’ll be perfect for cereal in the mornings and leftovers at midnight – just make sure everything is microwave safe!

Moving into your first dorm is a really fun experience but pack your cart wisely. Those $2.99 knickknacks can add up – buying only what you need saves money, space and stress!

Anna Meskishvili is a rising senior at Boston University pursuing a degree in public relations at the College of Communication and hopes to someday work in healthcare administration communication. She is part of Kappa Delta at BU and has loved every second of it. She is also involved in Public Relations Student Society of America and Ed on Campus. Anna was born in the Republic of Georgia and considers herself a citizen of the world because she’s lived in Russia, England, France, Brooklyn and Connecticut. She loves to travel, run and learn.


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What to Consider When Selecting a Roommate

by Anna Meskishvili

Personally, I think that choosing a roommate is one of the most challenging things about college. They are the ultimate lottery. But in order to pick the right roommate for you, you must first properly understand yourself.

I’m sure you have all completed (or will soon complete) some variation of the “roommate survey,” which might reveal to you a prototype of the perfect roommate but here’s a reality check: Roommates are not perfect. In order to be the best roommate you can be, evaluate yourself. Speaking from experience, I thought I wanted to be best friends with my roommate, wanted my room to be the social hot spot of the floor and didn’t care about order or rules. Turns out, when you’re busy as a bee like me and are exhausted when you come home, the last thing you want to see is a dog pile of frat boys on your bed trying to see how many grapes they can shove in their mouths. Don’t get me wrong, I work hard and play hard but I always idealized my room as a place I could go to do neither those two things.

The bottom line about choosing roommates, make sure you both are on the same page and don’t just assume you are – talk about it. This is someone you will be living four feet away from for a year and avoidance is not an option. Top issues to cover are:

  • What time do you usually go to bed? Do you need the TV on to fall asleep?
  • Do you plan on studying or partying in the room?
  • If I vacuum the room on Mondays, can you do it on Fridays?
  • Are you going to have a lot of overnight guests? Let’s make a code.
  • Do you expect me to be in the room all the time?

And before you ask your prospective roommate any of these questions, ask them to yourself. Good luck, roomie!

Anna Meskishvili is a rising senior at Boston University pursuing a Bachelor’s Degree in Public Relations at the College of Communication. She is part of Kappa Delta at BU and has loved every second of it. She is also involved in Public Relations Student Society of America and Ed on Campus. Anna was born in the Republic of Georgia and considers herself a citizen of the world because she’s lived in Russia, England, France, Brooklyn and Connecticut. She hopes to someday work in Healthcare Administration Communication. She loves to travel, run and learn.


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College and the City

June 9, 2011

College and the City

by Anna Meskishvili

I knew well before I sent in my first Common App that I would find myself in a city for college. I needed the noise and commotion of a world much different than suburban Connecticut. As you know, I found my niche in Boston but there are some key things you need to know about city-school life:

Money. From museums to vintage boutiques to restaurants, there are limitless activities in a city but everything requires a pretty penny. Be sure to scope out all college discounts (ex., any BU student can go to the Museum of Fine Arts for free) and review sites like Groupon, Living Social and Privy before dishing out the dough.

Transportation. Get used to the fact that you won’t see the inside of a car for the time that you are attending school. In Boston, we use the subway system called the T. There’s even a T line that runs right through BU, making it simple to hop on on campus and hop off at any point in town. I recommend getting a semester pass – they seem pricy at first but they cost the same as 20 rides – and you’ll have more opportunities to explore the city with this unlimited option.

Security. You are in a city, not in Bumsville, MiddleOfNowhere. There are real threats, especially after dark and especially for girls. I would invest in pepper spray, or at least enough common sense to not walk alone past midnight. City or country, all campuses have Emergency Blue Light systems so find out where they are just in case.

Living in a city - on campus or off - has been fantastic! There is a never a dull evening – you even run into your fair share of celebrities like David Beckham, who was in town recently! – and with the proper precautions, a city can be as safe and accessible as you want it to be.

Anna Meskishvili is a rising senior at Boston University pursuing a degree in public relations at the College of Communication and hopes to someday work in healthcare administration communication. She is part of Kappa Delta at BU and has loved every second of it. She is also involved in Public Relations Student Society of America and Ed on Campus. Anna was born in the Republic of Georgia and considers herself a citizen of the world because she’s lived in Russia, England, France, Brooklyn and Connecticut. She loves to travel, run and learn.


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How to Play (and Win) the Roommate Game

by Carly Gerber

Whether you’ve known your soon-to-be roommate for years or have never met before, there will be ups and downs to living with another person. Here are my helpful tips on setting up a positive roommate relationship and what to do if you and your roommate aren’t hitting it off.

  • Find the right match. Your university may set up a Facebook page dedicated to helping students find roommates or the college has a system in place that sets you up with someone. Both systems allow you to list your personality traits and your interests to match you with an ideal roommate...but this is NOT the time to write down characteristics you hope to have one day because you’ll be linked with someone who doesn’t fit your natural traits. Be true about the person you are and you’ll find someone who is a great match.
  • Speak up. Your dorm room or apartment should feel just like home so if you feel uncomfortable about something your roommate is doing, speak up right away or refer to your roommate contract. I regret the times I didn’t speak up rather than the times I did: Nothing changed when I didn’t tell my roommate my feelings and the frustration stayed with me.
  • From BFF to archenemy. This can happen to two randomly selected students or two people who were once best friends at summer camp. Trust me, I’ve seen it! If you and your roommate have certain issues that can’t be resolved, then you have to decide if you can live with the person or if it’s best you end your living situation. Many universities allow you to switch roommates and some students get lucky enough to live in a dorm room alone!

Good luck in your roommate search but don’t sweat it if you and your roommate don’t get along. We all want the roommate who will become our best friend for life but many times, that doesn’t happen. Surround yourself with people who accept you and who you get along with.

Carly Gerber is majoring in journalism at Columbia College Chicago. She loves fashion and hopes to cover the topic for a Chicago-area magazine. In her free time, she focuses on her blog, loves making jewelry and spending time on Pinterest and Pose. She hopes to use this blog to guide and relate to its followers: college students like herself!


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How to Make Your Dorm Room Feel More Like Home

by Carly Gerber

For me, there’s nothing like the feeling of driving around my hometown and getting flashbacks of good memories with my friends and family. There is nothing that can replace the familiarity of your childhood home but it’s important to make your dorm/apartment and your campus your second home. Here are a few things I did with my college living space to feel more like home:

  • Display photos. Whenever I’m having a not-so-great day, looking at photos of my loved ones or of a photo that has a good memory linked to it will put me in a better mood. I put photos all over my apartment to make it feel more like home.
  • Play up your interests. I love candles so it was annoying freshman year when I couldn’t light any of them. (Thank you, Glade PlugIns!) Now that I live off campus, I always decorate with candles – they make my room feel more cozy and welcoming. I also recommend decorating with things that interest you: If you’re a music junkie, decorate your walls with posters of your favorite bands and if you love fashion, tear pictures from magazines and make a cool collage.
  • Accept what you can’t change. I remember hearing my roommate complain that the dorm room was way too small and it made her miss her big room, big closet and big house. I know many of us don’t have the luxury of big beds and big closets but my point is that college living is going to be different than living at home. The rooms will be smaller, the beds will be narrower and you’ll be living in close quarters with someone you may barely know. If you can’t change it, embrace it – you’ll usually be better off for it!

Carly Gerber is majoring in journalism at Columbia College Chicago. She loves fashion and hopes to cover the topic for a Chicago-area magazine. In her free time, she focuses on her blog, loves making jewelry and spending time on Pinterest and Pose. She hopes to use this blog to guide and relate to its followers: college students like herself!


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Creating Healthy Habits in College

by Carly Gerber

As we all know, it’s tough living a healthy lifestyle at college but according to USA Today College, doing so can lead to a higher GPA! Here are a few tips from me to help you live a little healthier while attending college:

  • Earn It. Sometimes, the best way to relax and forget about a hectic day is by watching TV but don’t go overboard and become a couch potato. Watching too much TV or spending too much time online can lead to procrastination so tell yourself that you have to earn an hour of TV or 20 minutes on Facebook. Just finished a paper for your English class? Awesome! Enjoy an episode of Homeland...because you’ve earned it.
  • Get Moving. Working out is the best thing you can do for your body and mind. According to the Mayo Clinic, frequently hitting the gym reduces stress, fatigue, helps your overall health and, eventually, you’ll look damn good in a bathing suit. Before the upcoming semester, buy a calendar and schedule work out days. Instead of exercising alone, go to fitness classes or enlist your roommate as a workout buddy to stay dedicated.
  • Find Alternatives. We all get hungry after a night of college activities but avoid eating a cheeseburger, hotdog, pizza or burrito; instead, enjoy a bowl of popcorn or veggies and dip. Buying healthy alternatives specifically for late-night munching helps me stay on track. I’ve already spent the money on these items at the grocery store, so why waste it?
  • Count Sheep. Regularly getting seven to nine hours of sleep improves concentration and memory and decreases hunger, fatigue and irritability. Create a sleep schedule that includes when you’ll go to sleep and when you’ll wake up. It’s hard for me to relax and fall asleep so I created a routine that tells my brain and body it’s time to relax. I wash up, light a candle with a relaxing scent, dim the lights and read a book. Within 30 minute, I’m fully relaxed and ready for bed.

Do you have any tips and tricks for a healthy college lifestyle?

Carly Gerber is majoring in journalism at Columbia College Chicago. She loves fashion and hopes to cover the topic for a Chicago-area magazine. In her free time, she focuses on her blog, loves making jewelry and spending time on Pinterest and Pose. She hopes to use this blog to guide and relate to its followers: college students like herself!


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A Guide to Surviving the Summer at Your Parents’ House

by Carly Gerber

Being away from home at college can make you feel liberated and independent. Nevertheless, summer break comes and moving back in with your parents is a reminder that you are not as close to independence as you thought: All of a sudden, you’re hit with rules, obligations and expectations that you lived without during the academic year!

Moving back in with your parents doesn’t have to be the end of the world. In fact, deciding to leave school and come home for a semester unintentionally helped me build a better relationship with my parents. Here are a few simple guidelines that will help you have a drama-free relationship with your parents over the summer:

  • Follow the house rules. Washing the dishes right after a meal or making your bed every morning may not make sense to you but when your parents ask you to do a simple chore, don’t fight them on it. Completing small tasks around the house is a lot better than having your mom scream at you for 30 minutes. Eventually, you’ll have zero fights with your parents and you’ll be the golden child, which can come with its own perks.
  • Remember where you are. A midnight Slurpee run on a weekday may be routine for you at school but certain behaviors should stay at college. Your parents may view staying out late on weekdays as irresponsible, especially if you have a summer job or internship. The weekend is the time for you to stay out late and relax, not during the work week.
  • Bond with you parents. Your parents may think your music is a bunch of noise but that doesn’t mean you can’t find other things you have in common. Ask your parents out to movie, to dinner, on a walk to a park or for ice cream. Take time during the summer to hang out with your parents as if they were your friends. They may surprise you with what cool and interesting people they can be as well as great roommates!

Carly Gerber is majoring in journalism at Columbia College Chicago. She loves fashion and hopes to cover the topic for a Chicago-area magazine. In her free time, she focuses on her blog, loves making jewelry and spending time on Pinterest and Pose. She hopes to use this blog to guide and relate to its followers: college students like herself!


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Is Facebook Ruining Your College Experience?

by Chelsea Slaughter

Recently, I read an article about whether or not Facebook was ruining the college experience. A huge benefit to going to college is having the chance to interact and socialize with people from diverse backgrounds but are students letting Facebook keep them from these advantages?

The article states that there is an increased level of “homophily” on campuses. Homophily equates to “birds of a feather flock together” – students are using Facebook to find roommates more like themselves rather than learning about someone with a different background and set of interests. It also allows people to keep so much more in touch with childhood friends and family that they cling to old ties instead of taking the risk to create new ones.

I agree that the problem isn’t mainly Facebook but the students using it! When I graduated high school, I was so excited for my new college experience that I started a group on Facebook called “Jacksonville State University Class of 2014.” At first, it was just me adding people I knew who were going but I also added my JSU recruiter; she added all of her recruits, they added people they knew and the group continued to grow. For the entire summer, I socialized with incoming freshmen about dorm placements, orientation dates and class schedules. By the time school started, I knew a VARIETY of amazing people on campus!

Facebook and other social sites are what you make them – do not allow them to keep you in the same place and hinder your chance to learn diversity and growth! Yes, it’s smart to take caution when meeting new people but don’t shy away from new experiences. Be open, get involved and don’t be afraid of getting to know someone different...WITHOUT computer screens between you!

Chelsea Slaughter is currently a junior at Jacksonville State University majoring in communications (public relations concentration) and minoring in art. She serves as a resident assistant on campus, is the treasurer in the Public Relations Organization and is an active member in W.I.S.E., NAACP and Omicron Delta Kappa Honors Leadership Society. She aims to work in the entertainment industry post-graduation and is well on her way thanks to an internship with a digital marketer to several music artists. Chelsea strives to achieve all of her goals and motivate others along the way.


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