Blog

Senioritis: The New Disease

Nov 16, 2015

by Christina Zhou

For many students, the second half of senior year is seen as a welcome change from the first three and a half years of high school. They've applied to college, and admissions decisions have come back. This is often the beginning of a downhill slide in terms of grades and class performance. "Senioritis" may be inevitable to an extent, but it can have very real consequences. If colleges see that the student has not shown the level of academic promise that they previously exhibited, then they may rescind their acceptance. Even if this does not happen, however, students may not be adequately prepared for the academic rigor of college. Below are some tips to help you battle senioritis.

  • Stay organized. Keep up with your homework and assignments. A planner or even a mobile organization app is a very good idea. Note all exam dates and set aside blocks of time specifically for studying. Don't forget to pencil in social time as well.
  • Keep your eyes on the prize.Remember all the hard work you put in over the last twelve years or so? It will all be wasted if you don't work hard until the end.
  • Find a new activity. College is a very busy time, and this may be the last bit of free time you will have for a while. Now is the time to become a better you. Volunteer, read that book you’ve got sitting on your shelf, or take a fun class. You will have more things to talk about with your future college classmates.
  • Think about that college credit. If you do well enough on your AP tests, many colleges will give you credit for those classes. Students can often come in having completed many of their required classes. This gives you time to start your major earlier than many others, and you can even end up graduating early!
  • Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (1)

Posted Under:

College Classes , College Culture , College Life , Tips

Tags:


November National Scholarship Month

Nov 5, 2015

by Susan Dutca

November is National Scholarship Month, referred to by the National Scholarship Providers Association, and just so happens to be our favorite month of the year! This month is a special time to raise awareness of scholarship opportunities for current and future college students. Also, it's an excellent time to begin your scholarship search if you have not done so already. To help you in your search, we have compiled a list of scholarships with end-of-the-year deadlines, as well as scholarships for next year, so as to help you apply before the year is over. Dedicate some time to applying for current and coming academic years with these scholarships:

Arizona Milk Producers Scholarship

Deadline: November 9, 2015
Available to: High school seniors – college seniors
Maximum Award: $12,000

Is your 'stache worth the cash? Dairy plays an important role in fueling active minds and bodies, and can now help you earn a college scholarship. Simply take a picture of your best milk mustache for the chance to win a top $12,000 scholarship.

You must be enrolled or plan to enroll in an Arizona university as a full-time students to qualify. Make sure you are the only one in the photo and that a diary product is clearly visible in the photo. Upload your photo to Instagram and tag @azmilkproducers using the hashtag #ampscholarshipcontest and #ASU, #NAU or #UofA.

For more information and to apply, please visit Arizona Milk Producers Scholarship

The Resolve to Evolve Scholarship

Deadline: December 9, 2015
Available to: Scholarships.com Members
Maximum Award: $2,000

The Resolve to Evolve Scholarship is about more than just making resolutions - it's about creating change and furthering our evolution as individuals and a society. Applicants must write an essay of no more than 5,000 characters, addressing a two-part question.

All applicants must be registered members of Scholarships.com in order to qualify. If you have not already registered, go to the Scholarships.com home page and register now for free.

For more information and to apply, please visit The Resolve to Evolve Scholarship

Our World-Underwater Society Rolex Scholarship

Deadline: December 31, 2015
Available to: Graduate students ages 21-26
Maximum Award: $25,000

Our World-Underwater Scholarship Society has provided firsthand experiences in underwater-related disciplines to young people considering careers in the underwater world. Each year a Rolex scholar is selected to work with leaders in marine-related fields. Scholars partake in endeavors ranging from scientific expeditions to laboratory assignments.

Students must not have earned a graduate degree and have not chosen a clearly defined career path, as well as be between the ages of 21 and 26.

Students must have certification as a Rescue Diver or equivalent with a minimum of 25 dives within the past two years.

For more information and to apply, please visit Our World-Underwater Society Rolex Scholarship

Doodle 4 Google Art Competition

Deadline: December 7, 2015
Available to: Ages 5-18
Maximum Award: Up to $30,000

From cave paintings to selfies, artists have always found creative ways of expressing themselves. Google is asking young students to use their homepage as a canvas by doodling with any materials to show what makes them unique.

The winner's artwork will be featured on the Google homepage for a day, and one national winner will also receive a $40,000 scholarship. Students in grades K-12 are invited to participate and must incorporate the letters G-O-O-G-L-E.

For more information and to apply, please visit Doodle 4 Google Art Competition

The Center for Alcohol Policy Essay Contest

Deadline: December 5, 2015
Available to: 18 years and older
Maximum Award: $5,000

This year's essay topic for The Center of Alcohol Policy's contest is: "This year marks the 10 year anniversary of the Supreme Court's Granholm decision, which ruled against two states' laws that discriminated against out-of-state alcohol producers but also affirmed that "The three-tier system is unquestionably legitimate." How has this "unquestionably legitimate" system fostered competition, increased new products available to consumers and worked to protect consumers and the public?"

Applicants must be 18 years or older to apply and may email or postmark their essays.

For more information and to apply, please visit The Center for Alcohol Policy Essay Contest

The Anne Ford Scholarship

Deadline: December 15, 2015
Available to: Graduating high school seniors
Maximum Award: $10,000

The Anne Ford Scholarship is a $10,000 scholarship to a graduating high school senior with a documented learning disability who will be enrolled in a full-time bachelor's degree program.

Students must demonstrate financial need and provide current documentation of an identified learning disability. Must maintain a 3.0 GPA or higher and must be able to articulate his/her learning disability and demonstrate the importance of self-advocacy.

For more information and to apply, please visit The Anne Ford Scholarship

Colored Rocks Contest

Deadline: December 4, 2015
Available to: Graduating high school seniors
Maximum Award: $3,500

The Colored Rocks Foundation annually awards 15 high-achieving senior male high school students from diverse ethnic backgrounds who have committed to help at least one of their struggling peers achieve their high school diploma.

Applicants must answer a 2-part essay (500-1,000 words) and submit a community project plan. Applicants must attend and graduate from a high school in Georgia to be eligible for the award.

For more information and to apply, please visit Colored Rocks Contest

Hispanic Annual Salute Award

Deadline: December 4, 2015
Available to: Graduating high school seniors
Maximum Award: $2,000

Hispanic Annual Salute offers scholarship to Hispanic youth who exhibit and encourage volunteerism. The goal is to provide students an opportunity to continue their education beyond high school.

Students must graduate from high school, maintain a 2.5 GPA or higher and perform notable volunteer contribution in the Hispanic community, specifically unpaid volunteer activity not related to fulfilling a school requirement. Applicants must reside in Colorado.

For more information and to apply, please visit Hispanic Annual Salute Award

Burger King Scholar Program

Deadline: December 15, 2015
Available to: Graduating high school seniors
Maximum Award: $1,000

Created in memory of Burger King’s Co-founder James “Jim” W. McLamore, the Burger King Scholars program awards students who have a strong academic record with a minimum 2.0 GPA. Students should be passionate about serving their community and be a high school senior, BK employee, spouse/domestic partner or child of an employee.

High school students should be graduating seniors who plan on attending a two- or four-year accredited university.

For more information and to apply, please visit Burger King Scholar Program

Cancer for College Scholarships

Deadline: January 31, 2016
Available to: Undergraduate students
Maximum Award:$16,000

No child should ever have to deal with cancer. That is why Cancer for College provides hope and inspiration to cancer survivors in the form of college scholarships. Applicants must be a cancer patient or cancer survivor to be eligible and must be a US resident enrolled in an accredited university or community college.

Cancer for College offers several different scholarships so make sure to read the eligibility and criteria requirements for each before applying.

For more information and to apply, please visit Cancer for College Scholarships

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (3)

Keeping Your Recommendation From Being A “Wreck”-omendation

Nov 2, 2015

by Christina Zhou

When it comes to college applications, most students worry more about whether or not their grades are high enough, whether their essays are well-written, or if they have enough extracurricular activities. Recommendation letters are often lower on the list of priorities and are often hastily asked for close to the deadline. However, recommendation letters are often one of the most common ways to distinguish between quality applications. Below are several ways to avoid getting tepid recommendation letters that make your otherwise quality application look lackluster.

  • Ask early. Teachers are often very busy, and quality recommendation letters take time and effort to write. Asking them right before the deadline is both inconvenient and inconsiderate. They may flat out turn down your request, and if you don't have backup options, you may miss out on applying for certain schools. Even if they do, they will most likely not do as good a job as they could have done if you had asked sooner.
  • Teach them about you. If they agree to write a recommendation letter, you should provide them with a copy of your resume. If you don't have a resume, a short summary of yourself will do. You might also want to refresh their memory of your performance in class.
  • Choose wisely. Ask a teacher that you had for a class fairly recently - junior year is probably best. The exception to this is if you have a teacher that you have had for multiple classes and/or have built up a very good relationship with. For example, you can ask your band teacher for a recommendation if you have been in band for many years and performed well. If you are applying with a specific major in mind, or if you are applying to a major-specific program, it would be a good idea to try and get a recommendation from a teacher that teaches that subject.
  • Ask in person. This is so important! You can email to meet with them to talk about it, but the actual request should be done in person. Recommendation letters are time-consuming to write, and also require a level of connection. Too many recommendation letters sound like fill-in-the-blank forms.
  • Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (0)

Posted Under:

College Life , High School , Tips , Virtual Intern

Tags:


Top Student Organizing Apps

Oct 26, 2015

by Erica Lewis

For people who are highly-organized, you want a way to keep track of everything you have to get done. It's one thing to write it down, but students often lose the list or forget about it entirely. So how can you keep organized, get all your homework done, and still have leisure time? Since we tend to have quick and easy access to mobile devices, check out some of these organizational mobile apps.

  • Evernote. This app allows you to sync everything between your phone and computer for the best accessibility: anywhere, anytime. From notes to task lists, Evernote keeps you focused on moving ideas from inspiration to completion. Best used for note-taking, you can also clip web images, capture handwritten notes and snap photos to keep the physical and digital details of your projects with you at all times.
  • MyHomework. Do you forget your school agenda? Do you have a hard time reading your planner? Looking for a replacement to the paper planner or academic agenda? MyHomework is the solution. It allows you to program all important deadlines and tasks. The modern design and simple interface makes great for easy navigation. You can upload pictures and files to your homework and classes as well as use a class schedule widget for today's classes.
  • Finish. Named the "to-do list for procrastinators," the app reminds students of assignments to be completed. Give track of your completed assignments through the automatic archive tool. Finish also gives rewards for completing tasks on time. The most unique feature is its automated timeframes system - all you have to do is add your task by specifying a name and due date and Finish does the rest. Finally, Finish sorts timeframes as time elapses - set your priorities to either "short term" or "mid term" to let Finish notify you of due dates.
  • Pocket Points. This app is not necessarily for organization, but Pocket Points gives you rewards simply for not using your phone in class. Why not get rewarded for following the rules? The more points you get, the better rewards you can earn. Simply open the app, lock your phone, and start gaining points. Points can be used for great discounts at local and online businesses, such as food and clothing!
  • The best part of all these apps? They are FREE, just like Scholarships.com. Scheduling doesn't have to be difficult, and neither does paying for school. Make sure to keep checking scholarships.com for new opportunities!

    And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (0)

How to Not Lose It with Group Projects

Oct 5, 2015

by Erica Lewis

Oh, yes, group projects. When it comes to group projects, you either love 'em or hate 'em. There's really no in-between. So how do you keep your cool when you can't stand your partners or the project itself?

  • Divide the work evenly. Don't let one person do all the work and then have the other names attached to the project. Although the load may be carried more heavily by one person, it's important to make sure that everyone plays an important role and is kept up to date. This is crucial if you're doing a group presentation and not simply submitting the project.
  • Make use of in-class work time. Many professors will give groups time in class to work on their projects. There may not be enough time to accomplish everything during this period, but it can help everyone figure out their individual tasks so you don’t have to do more work than necessary. It's also a great time to ask questions if you are unsure about any instructions or requirements.
  • Set deadlines even if they aren't assigned. The project isn't due until the end of the semester, so you can put it off, right? Wrong. However tempting it may be to procrastinate, it is better to set deadlines for your group even if the professor hasn’t assigned them. Schedule a meeting with all the group members and hold everyone accountable for their job. It just makes things easier in the long run.
  • Group projects don't have to be a daunting task, and neither does paying for school. Make sure to keep checking out your scholarship opportunities.

    Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (3)

Dietary Restrictions in the Dining Hall

Sep 21, 2015

by Christina Zhou

Although schools are becoming increasingly diverse with its food options, the situation is still fairly grim for those who have special dietary considerations. Foods with strong dietary specifications, such as vegetarianism or religious dietary products, can be difficult to come by and usually do not have many options. However, this deficit can be resolved with the following tips:

  • Stock up on stock. For many, buying the raw ingredients for the foods that they want to eat is unfeasible both practically and financially. However, soups are both easy to prepare and cheap to buy. Additionally, they keep fresh for a long time and can be bought in bulk.
  • Join a group. Nowadays, you can find almost any sort of club you want on a college campus. Try finding a group out there that fits your needs. These sorts of clubs often have get-togethers with opportunities for free food. This way, you have easy access to the foods you need and can bond with other students.
  • Bring snacks. Look into nearby stores and see if you can find options there. Simple things like dried fruit and granola bars are usually cheap and keep fresh for a long time. If you live close enough, you can also try to bring some food supplies from home.
  • Seek out advice resources. There are many nutrition and food services available for students, including dining services and student health. Ask about feasible options nearby as well as nutritional information. Additionally, take advantage of the most underused resource: current students. Talk to them and find out what they do to get around these dining problems. This goes for many other situations as well. The upperclassmen have gone through the same college struggles as you, and are usually more than happy to give advice.
  • And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (17)

Posted Under:

College Budgets , College Life , Tips , Virtual Intern

Tags:


Extracurricular Activities: Not Just Application Fillers

Sep 14, 2015

by Christina Zhou

When it comes to choosing extracurricular activities, many students are concerned about whether or not the activity will look good on college applications. They end up either changing activities without commitment or stick with an activity that they don't particularly enjoy, but believe will look good to colleges. However, working or getting involved in clubs and sports can and should be fun! Below is a list of tips as to how you should approach high school extracurricular activities to help you obtain that much-desired college acceptance.

  • Join early. Building strong extracurricular activities takes time. Being in the program for a longer amount of time allows for more experience and better chances of obtaining leadership roles.
  • Think quality, not quantity. Someone who spent four years in their school's jazz band and was the first chair of their section will look more dedicated than someone who was in fifteen clubs but never did much more than attend meetings. Try to obtain leadership roles in whatever extracurricular activities you choose.
  • Pursue your passions. You may think your hobbies are too weird to impress colleges, but that's false. If you show enough dedication to an activity, whether it be basketball or making duct tape art, colleges will be interested. Remember, interviews are an important part of the college admissions process, and you will be asked to elaborate on your extracurricular activities. If you dislike what you do, it will show.
  • Don't forget about school! Although extracurricular activities are vital, grades and standardized test scores are also incredibly important. Be involved, but make sure to leave enough time for studying, as well as for some free time. Although it may feel like it sometimes, your time in high school does not need to be a non-stop pursuit of acceptance to college.
  • And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (0)

Posted Under:

High School , Just for Fun , Tips , Virtual Intern

Tags:


High Stakes Testing

Aug 24, 2015

by Emily Rabinowitz

Chances are if you’re on scholarships.com, you probably care about boosting your application to scholarships or colleges. The standardized test can be a huge plus for good test takers or a major stressor for others. Here are some general guidelines to help you make your testing plan and decisions easier.

  • Timing. There are many rumors about what dates have a better curve but essentially for the SAT or the ACT, it’s all about making the most of your studying. For instance, remember that if you schedule a test for January or June, you might also be studying for midterm and final exams. The May exams are also infamous because that’s when the Advanced Placement tests occur. However, many students take the subject tests that correspond with their AP classes during the May exam. It’s important to remember that not all subject tests are offered every exam date, so you’ll want to plan those accordingly. If you’re planning on taking the SAT, remember that the last date for the current version is January 2016. Finally, don’t wait too long to take the test. Many students do better their second or third time around, and you want to give yourself the chance to learn from your mistakes.
  • Studying. The ACT and the SAT are two distinctly different tests as some students will see greater variation between test scores than others. The general word of caution is to take a full practice exam before you take the real test. Try waking up early one weekend and replicating the exam scenario as completely as possible; this will give you the best estimate of your score. Remember that simple things like reading the newspaper or a challenging book can improve your score as well.
  • Stay Positive. Your score is not everything in your college or scholarship application. More and more schools are disregarding test scores in favor of essays, extracurricular activities and letters of recommendation. The worst thing you could do for your application is put all of your bets into your SAT or ACT score. So if you find yourself a terrible test taker, that’s okay. Find something else that you’re fantastic at, and make it noticeable. One of the best pieces of advice I got was that if a school turns you down because of your test scores, you probably don’t want to be there to begin with.
  • You are not a test score. Always remember that.

    Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (0)

The Text Book Game

Aug 24, 2015

by Christina Zhou

You’re starting college, excited to be embarking on the next big adventure, and…is that flimsy textbook really $500? For many students, the prospect of obtaining the course booklist on the typical college allowance may seem daunting at first. However, the following tips on how to be smart when buying textbooks can help you save a lot of tears and money.

  • Wait and see. Some (cruel) professors will put texts on the course booklist and never end up using them, causing students to waste money by rushing out and buying them immediately. It’s a good idea to wait a couple days to see which books you really need. Also, try asking previous students which books they used.
  • Ask upperclassmen. Speaking of previous students, upperclassmen can also be a great source for cheap textbooks. If you’re lucky, they might even give them to you for free!
  • Buy used, and online. This may seem obvious, but you’d be surprised at the number of students who immediately go to the campus bookstore and buy hardcover before looking up the prices of paperback from alternate online sellers. Amazon, eBay, and Chegg are good starting points for your search. However, make sure to check their approval rating before purchasing, as a good price is not worth poor quality.
  • Utilize the library. Schools will sometimes keep a copy or two of popular textbooks in the library. Get there fast before they’re gone, as you are competing with many other students for what is at most a handful of copies.
  • Embrace technology. Print might feel good, but the higher price won’t. Opt for e-books instead, to save on both money and backpack space.
  • Get your money back. Selling your own textbooks after you’re finished with them is a great method to get back some of the initial expense.
  • And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (4)

Mom’s Famous Spaghetti

Aug 17, 2015

by Emily Rabinowitz

It seems like to get into college these days students have to be involved in nearly everything: sports, debate team, internships, nonprofit volunteering, honor societies, part time jobs…the list of potential activities goes on. But how do you describe yourself adequately without breaking the cardinal rule of the college essay: Do Not Regurgitate Your Resume? Here’s a little metaphor to help break it down.

Imagine that all the different pieces of you are embodied in ingredients to your favorite meal. Your volunteering is the pasta, your creativity is the tomato, your leadership is the salt, that time you lost the championship game is the garlic…and so on. Now imagine that your college essay is the recipe and it has to tell the admissions officer, the cook, how to make your Mom’s famous spaghetti.

To make her sauce it is important to have the right proportions: how many tomatoes, how much salt and how much garlic? A list of ingredients is nothing without the amounts and neither is your application. Did you spend a year on a research project? Have you volunteered since you were in elementary school? Look to the length of your involvement for signs of character growth, project manifestation, and endurance.

Once you put the ingredients in the pot, you have to heat them up. You have to stir it to just the right temperature so that the scent fills the air around you. The circumstances of your involvement are important too. Did you finish the race despite all odds? Did you try something new? How did it change you? In what way did you interact with your environment to accomplish something?

Then there’s the secret ingredient, the one that Mom’s grandmother’s grandmother whispered in her ear years ago. It’s the ingredient that lets the sauce linger on your taste buds just a second longer so you can savor the taste. In your essay, it’s what creates the perfect picture of you. For me, it was sharing my biggest hopes and dreams, for you it might be describing the way your hands shook when you held the trophy, or the feeling of your first paycheck. It is something unchangeable, something only cultivated by a true connection between the reader and the writer.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (1)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>
Page 1 of 87

Recent Posts

Tags

ACT (20)
Advanced Placement (24)
Alumni (17)
Applications (90)
Athletics (17)
Back To School (80)
Books (67)
Campus Life (471)
Career (115)
Choosing A College (65)
College (1025)
College Admissions (257)
College And Society (333)
College And The Economy (381)
College Applications (152)
College Benefits (292)
College Budgets (219)
College Classes (451)
College Costs (503)
College Culture (613)
College Goals (389)
College Grants (54)
College In Congress (91)
College Life (590)
College Majors (228)
College News (623)
College Prep (169)
College Savings Accounts (19)
College Scholarships (163)
College Search (122)
College Students (496)
College Tips (133)
Community College (59)
Community Service (40)
Community Service Scholarships (28)
Course Enrollment (19)
Economy (122)
Education (29)
Education Study (30)
Employment (42)
Essay Scholarship (39)
FAFSA (55)
Federal Aid (102)
Finances (71)
Financial Aid (419)
Financial Aid Information (61)
Financial Aid News (59)
Financial Tips (41)
Food (45)
Food/Cooking (28)
GPA (80)
Grades (91)
Graduate School (56)
Graduate Student Scholarships (21)
Graduate Students (65)
Graduation Rates (38)
Grants (63)
Health (38)
High School (135)
High School News (76)
High School Student Scholarships (185)
High School Students (320)
Higher Education (115)
Internships (526)
Job Search (179)
Just For Fun (122)
Loan Repayment (41)
Loans (50)
Military (16)
Money Management (134)
Online College (21)
Pell Grant (29)
President Obama (24)
Private Colleges (34)
Private Loans (20)
Roommates (100)
SAT (23)
Scholarship Applications (165)
Scholarship Information (179)
Scholarship Of The Week (272)
Scholarship Search (221)
Scholarship Tips (89)
Scholarships (405)
Sports (63)
Sports Scholarships (22)
Stafford Loans (24)
Standardized Testing (46)
State Colleges (43)
State News (36)
Student Debt (86)
Student Life (513)
Student Loans (142)
Study Abroad (68)
Study Skills (215)
Teachers (94)
Technology (111)
Tips (514)
Transfer Scholarship (17)
Tuition (93)
Undergraduate Scholarships (37)
Undergraduate Students (155)
Volunteer (45)
Work And College (83)
Work Study (20)
Writing Scholarship (19)

Categories

529 Plan (2)
Back To School (385)
College And The Economy (566)
College Applications (275)
College Budgets (361)
College Classes (594)
College Costs (817)
College Culture (1003)
College Grants (150)
College In Congress (152)
College Life (1059)
College Majors (355)
College News (1034)
College Savings Accounts (59)
College Search (404)
Coverdell (1)
FAFSA (125)
Federal Aid (157)
Fellowships (25)
Financial Aid (741)
Food/Cooking (79)
GPA (281)
Graduate School (109)
Grants (81)
High School (574)
High School News (268)
Housing (175)
Internships (580)
Just For Fun (248)
Press Releases (24)
Roommates (144)
Scholarship Applications (245)
Scholarship Of The Week (371)
Scholarships (676)
Sports (80)
Standardized Testing (62)
Student Loans (232)
Study Abroad (63)
Tips (873)
Uncategorized (7)
Virtual Intern (571)