Skip Navigation Links

What You Need (and Don’t Need) on Campus

July 11, 2011

What You Need (and Don’t Need) on Campus

by Jacquelene Bennett

Packing for college can be stressful and frustrating. You buy something you think you are going to need and end up never using it or you forget to buy something and end up making 20 trips to the store on the already crazy move-in day. But fear not, I am here to help.

Now I know that colleges give students lists of things to bring with them but those lists can be wrong. Below, I have provided you with some helpful tips on what and what not to bring with you to college that I have learned myself over the last few years.

What to Bring

  • Extra linens. A few towels and an extra set of extra-long twin sheets go a long way when you’re out of quarters for laundry.
  • Mattress pads. If you are able to get several of these for your bed, DO IT – you back will thank you later on because you will be sleeping on an old, used mattress that will be very uncomfortable otherwise.
  • Pictures and decorations. Being away from home for the first time sucks. Bring lots of pictures and familiar stuff to make you feel more comfortable.

What Not to Bring

  • Desk lamp. The light is too bright to have on while your roommate is asleep and the overhead light you have in your room is good enough while you are doing homework.
  • Printer. More than likely, your school has a printing quota that allows you to print from the school’s computer labs that rather than buying your own paper and ink.
  • Every article of clothing you own. When you move in, it’s still summertime. Bring only seasonal clothing with you and switch them out when you are home for Thanksgiving or Christmas.

Jacquelene Bennett is a rising senior at the University of Redlands where her areas of study are creative writing, government and religious studies. When she is not studying or working, you can usually find her eating frozen yogurt or blogging about her day. She has a cactus named Kat and believes that Stephen Colbert is a genius. Jacquelene works hard, laughs hard and knows that one day you’ll see her name in lights.

Comments

California Makes Cuts, Students Feel the Pain

June 28, 2011

California Makes Cuts, Students Feel the Pain

by Jacquelene Bennett

It was recently announced that many state-funded universities in California were eliminating or reducing summer sessions due to budget cutbacks. This news comes on the eve of California lawmakers finally passing a budget plan in the state senate that would help modify the California’s debt problems. While this plan may help with the state's deficit, it puts thousands of students in trouble.

Summer school has traditionally been a time for students to either gain headway with their degrees or to stay on track with their programs because of unforeseen circumstances during the regular academic year. But now due to the budget plan, some schools like West Los Angeles College are not offering summer courses at all while other schools such as Cal Poly Pomona are increasing summer tuition fees and offering fewer classes. It is also being reported that many state universities as well as several California community colleges will offer less for-credit courses while still maintaining and offering specialized training courses and not-for-credit classes for students during the summer.

So what does this mean for students? Not only will they have to pay more per unit for summer courses than if they were taking them during the traditional academic period but the available summer classes will be not-for-credit and the for-credit classes will be extremely difficult and expensive to register for. So with the already overcrowded state schools raising the tuition fees earlier this year, these new cuts will further delay a student's ability to graduate on time.

Jacquelene Bennett is a rising senior at the University of Redlands where her areas of study are creative writing, government and religious studies. When she is not studying or working, you can usually find her eating frozen yogurt or blogging about her day. She has a cactus named Kat and believes that Stephen Colbert is a genius. Jacquelene works hard, laughs hard and knows that one day you’ll see her name in lights.

Comments

My Favorite Blogs and Websites

July 1, 2011

My Favorite Blogs and Websites

by Jacquelene Bennett

Today’s world (and our generation especially) is dependent on the Internet. We use it for school, work, to interact with friends and strangers, to find directions...the list goes on and on. There is so much information on the web that navigating it can leave you lost, so to help ease this confusion, I thought I would share some of my favorite websites and blogs with you all.

Smart Pretty & Awkward: While this blog is mostly geared towards college girls, guys might find some of the advice helpful, too. The author, Molly Ford, gives daily tips on how to be smarter, prettier, and less awkward; this advice ranges from social situations to decorative ideas to how to find good deals on online shopping.

Hyperbole and a Half: I love this blog because it is hilarious and just pure awesomeness. Creator Allie Brosh writes and illustrates stories about her life and childhood and the stories are always so funny. If you’re taking a study break and want a laugh, definitely read this blog.

The Onion: This website is satire and sarcasm done right – they make fun of how the mainstream media pick and deliver news stories. The stories and articles are completely ridiculous and always entertaining.

The New York Times: Don’t get me wrong, I do read the print version of the New York Times (I think everyone should!) but its website is updated every few minutes throughout the day. No more waiting until the following morning to read about the latest breaking news!

Now these are just some of my favorite sites. If you don’t like any of these, you can always start your own blog!

Jacquelene Bennett is a rising senior at the University of Redlands where her areas of study are creative writing, government and religious studies. When she is not studying or working, you can usually find her eating frozen yogurt or blogging about her day. She has a cactus named Kat and believes that Stephen Colbert is a genius. Jacquelene works hard, laughs hard and knows that one day you’ll see her name in lights.

Comments

To Stay Informed on Campus, Develop a Nose for News

June 13, 2011

To Stay Informed on Campus, Develop a Nose for News

by Jacquelene Bennett

One of the most striking differences between high school and college is how everyone pays attention to the news. Most students are up to date with their current events and world happenings and they love to talk about it in and out of class. So how can you become news savvy?

Whether they are reading online newspapers, blog or user-generated content on social media sites, college students get their news primarily through the Internet. I first learned about Bin Laden's death through Facebook after someone had posted it as their status and I know people who get Twitter updates from online publications sent directly to their phones so they can stay on top of major news events.

Another way to gather news is by watching television. CNN or MSNBC is always on in the cafeteria or coffeehouse area at my school. My friends and I tune in to those channels but we prefer to watch “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart” and “The Colbert Report.” These shows keep you informed without beating you over the head with hours of unimportant opinions and reports and they make you laugh in the process.

Of course, there is always the traditional method of gathering news: newspapers and other print media. When I’m on campus, I never have to look very far to find copies of the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Wall Street Journal or a number of local publications. Not only are these print publications widely available to students every day but they are also free. Thanks, U of R!

So for all you incoming college freshmen, I would recommend you brushing up on your current events and for all you fellow college goers, how do you stay informed?

Jacquelene Bennett is a rising senior at the University of Redlands where her areas of study are creative writing, government and religious studies. When she is not studying or working, you can usually find her eating frozen yogurt or blogging about her day. She has a cactus named Kat and believes that Stephen Colbert is a genius. Jacquelene works hard, laughs hard and knows that one day you’ll see her name in lights.

Comments

Save Your Standardized Test Scores!

June 2, 2011

Save Your Standardized Test Scores!

by Jacquelene Bennett

Here is a bit of advice for all you graduating high school seniors: Save your test scores!

All that time and money you spent on the SATs, ACTs and APs and all those other acronymonous tests are not for naught! Besides being a tool for college admittance, these tests will actually benefit you later on in your college career. I know...crazy, right? All that time spent studying vocabulary, major historical dates and algebraic equations was actually worth it in the long run!

I know from personal experience: My SAT I scores on the writing and reading comprehension sections (good but not great scores, mind you) exempted me from a general requirement writing class. While your SAT scores are generally used for assessing your placement within a university, these scores can sometimes aid your college in placing you in the proper introductory classes or can waive your gen eds entirely (though every school is different so check with the registrar).

For those of you who took AP classes and did well on the final AP tests, scores of three or higher usually exempt you from certain college courses. I have a friend who didn’t have to take any history, science or foreign language gen eds because her AP scores were accepted in lieu of taking these classes. Pretty cool!

So, like I said before, save those scores! And for those you who are still undergoing this standardized testing process, do your best on them – they could save you from the headache of having to take a 100-level English class later on.

Jacquelene Bennett is a rising senior at the University of Redlands where her areas of study are creative writing, government and religious studies. When she is not studying or working, you can usually find her eating frozen yogurt or blogging about her day. She has a cactus named Kat and believes that Stephen Colbert is a genius. Jacquelene works hard, laughs hard and knows that one day you’ll see her name in lights.

Comments

First Contact of the Roommate Kind

June 7, 2011

First Contact of the Roommate Kind

by Jacquelene Bennett

Starting college can be exciting and intimidating all at the same time for myriad reasons but one thing that doesn’t have to be stressful is getting to know your future roommate. Schools generally reveal room assignments a couple of weeks before the start of the term, giving you plenty of time to get acquainted and prevent any possible problems.

As a freshman, I lived in a room with three other girls. Yes, you read that right: There were four of us in one room. Luckily, we all got along really well and respected each other’s lifestyles and schedules but there was still an adjustment period – this will always happen when living with someone new.

One way to help ease the shock is to make contact before school starts. My roommates and I called each before freshman orientation and though it was a bit awkward, talking to a stranger it was helpful. We discussed each other’s cleaning habits, sleep schedules, class schedules and music preferences so when we finally moved in, we already knew what to expect.

Not only does calling, emailing or Facebooking your new roommate ease the awkwardness of living with an unfamiliar person and setting standards for your room but it gives you a chance to cut costs as well. You can plan ahead of time which person is going to bring the mini-fridge and who is going to bring the television so you don’t need to buy both. The same should go for all shared items: My freshman roommates and I would take turns buying water bottles for everyone.

Living with someone you never met before is going to be awkward and uncomfortable in the beginning but you can help the situation by simply picking up the phone and calling them. Who knows, they could end up being your best friend!

Jacquelene Bennett is a rising senior at the University of Redlands where her areas of study are creative writing, government and religious studies. When she is not studying or working, you can usually find her eating frozen yogurt or blogging about her day. She has a cactus named Kat and believes that Stephen Colbert is a genius. Jacquelene works hard, laughs hard and knows that one day you’ll see her name in lights.

Comments

Meet Scholarships.com’s Virtual Interns: Jacquelene Bennett

May 13, 2011

Meet Scholarships.com’s Virtual Interns: Jacquelene Bennett

by Jacquelene Bennett

Hey yo! I am Jacquelene Bennett and come September, I will be a senior at the University of Redlands. I am double majoring in creative writing and government as well as minoring in religious studies – a lot of work, I know but as an aspiring writer/political journalist, I have found these subjects to be the most important and demanding issues in today’s world. Plus, these subjects (and the classes that accompany them) are intensely thought-provoking and fun; in fact, last semester, I wrote a short story about Marilyn Monroe for my fiction workshop!

I chose the University of Redlands mainly for its location. Born and raised in Southern California, I wanted to go to a school that was both close to home but far away enough that I could have a true “college experience.” Also, the U of R is in the heart of SoCal, so I am literally just an hour away (actual timing really depends on traffic here) from Los Angeles, San Diego, Disneyland, the Santa Monica Pier and Joshua Tree National Park. Since I began attending school, however, I have found the campus itself to be a treasure trove of beautiful scenery, fun events and wonderful people. True story: The U of R is one of only three California universities to be named a “Tree Campus” by the Arbor Day Foundation.

As I find myself getting closer and closer to graduation, I find that I have less and less spare time but in the rare moments that I am free, I like to listen to music, catch up on celebrity gossip and eat gummy bears and Fruit Gushers. Also, I like to say "cool beans."

From my freshman year up until now, I have built a repertoire of college knowledge and experiences just hoping that I would one day have the opportunity to share it with other people of the world. Well, it looks like that day has come and I am psyched!

Comments

How to Move Out Without Getting Stressed Out

May 20, 2011

How to Move Out Without Getting Stressed Out

by Jacquelene Bennett

It’s that time of the year again – summertime...and moving time for many college students. Here are a few simple tips for moving out of your doom or apartment:

  • Donate your stuff rather than throw it away. It’s the end of the year and you are realizing how much stuff you have accumulated over the last nine months. Rather than throwing away those jeans that don’t fit or that lamp you never use, donate them. At the end of every school year, Goodwill sets up a donation center on my campus where they will take everything from used clothing to electronics. See if your school does the same!
  • Utilize your school’s on-campus storage spaces. If your residence hall offers temporary summer storage for students, take advantage of it! Space is usually limited but this is a great option for storing things that you won't need during the summer months (think: mini-fridge and cooking utensils). If your school doesn’t have storage on campus, get some friends to split the cost of renting a storage locker somewhere near campus. Bonus: Many facilities offer discounts to college students.
  • Make sure to clean. It might be a hassle to vacuum the floors and take out the trash but it will cost you less in the long run. Schools often charge fees for unclean rooms (at my school, it’s $25 for every bag they fill with trash from a room) so if you don’t want to be billed, make sure it’s clean!
  • Keep it organized. Don’t just throw items in random boxes and suitcases; take the time to label them and make sure everything is secure. This will help when physically moving all your stuff and when you unpack later on at home.

Jacquelene Bennett is a rising senior at the University of Redlands where her areas of study are creative writing, government and religious studies. When she is not studying or working, you can usually find her eating frozen yogurt or blogging about her day. She has a cactus named Kat and believes that Stephen Colbert is a genius. Jacquelene works hard, laughs hard and knows that one day you’ll see her name in lights.

Comments

Consider Location, Location, Location When Selecting Your School

May 25, 2011

Consider Location, Location, Location When Selecting Your School

by Jacquelene Bennett

During my senior year in high school, I sent out applications not only to schools in my home state of California but to schools in Rhode Island, Washington and even England. I ultimately decided to stay in California because while going to a school in a different state or country sounded appealing and fun, it was just too unrealistic for me. Why? Location mattered.

Attending college in a different state can often times cost a fortune - not only are you paying out-of-state tuition rates (this doesn’t really apply to those going to private universities; they’re expensive regardless of where you live and attend) but you have to pay an arm and a leg to travel home for holidays and summer break. Also, there’s that issue of being away from your family: If you’re like me and have younger siblings, you want to be able to go to their basketball games and celebrate their birthdays. I knew that if I went too far from home, I would get too homesick and not enjoy my time at college.

Now I have nothing against those people who attend school in a different state – in fact, two of my closest friends at school are from Washington and Colorado – I’m just saying to think about what’s best for you. Can you afford the expenses? Can you stand to be away from your family? These are questions to ask yourself because you can still go away to school and be close to your family. I do...it’s just a matter of picking the right college. I go to a university that’s about 90 minutes from home; this is enough distance so that I feel like I have my own life here at school but am close enough that I can go home on the weekends if I want.

Jacquelene Bennett is a rising senior at the University of Redlands where her areas of study are creative writing, government and religious studies. When she is not studying or working, you can usually find her eating frozen yogurt or blogging about her day. She has a cactus named Kat and believes that Stephen Colbert is a genius. Jacquelene works hard, laughs hard and knows that one day you’ll see her name in lights.

Comments

Is an Independent Study Right for You?

December 8, 2011

Is an Independent Study Right for You?

by Jacquelene Bennett

Going to college means that you have the freedom to study whatever you want. Universities offer a variety of classes for students to take in a multitude of different subjects but what they will rarely tell you is that you can create your own class – it’s called independent study.

Independent studies allow college students to work one-on-one with professors and basically create their own classes for the semester. You decide what you study, what books to read and what sort of projects and papers you will do. I have a friend who created an independent study course around her study abroad experience. She wrote poems about the places she visited while abroad using pictures she took and the journal she kept while traveling. Her independent study course was not only four credits but it was applied towards her creative writing degree as well. I have another friend who created an independent study course that was basically just one big research project: She picked a topic in conference with a professor and spent the entire semester researching and writing a paper.

One huge positive about independent study courses is that if you have the right faculty support, you can create a class that will satisfy certain requirements and go towards your degree. The best part about an independent study course, though, is the fact that you get to choose what you study and how you spend your time – you don’t have to go to class every other day but instead you meet with a professor every other week. This is an excellent option for students taking more than the average course load to graduate early, satisfy double major requirements or work toward an individualized major.

Of course. there are down sides to independent study courses. You have to be able to manage your time and the projects you do for the course, as your final project will often determine your grade. If you can handle this responsibility, I would definitely recommend looking into designing an independent study course.

Jacquelene Bennett is a senior at the University of Redlands where her areas of study are creative writing, government and religious studies. When she is not studying or working, you can usually find her eating frozen yogurt or blogging about her day. She has a cactus named Kat and believes that Stephen Colbert is a genius. Jacquelene works hard, laughs hard and knows that one day you’ll see her name in lights.

Comments

Recent Posts

Tags

ACT (20)
Advanced Placement (24)
Alumni (17)
Applications (83)
Athletics (17)
Back To School (73)
Books (66)
Campus Life (458)
Career (115)
Choosing A College (53)
College (1007)
College Admissions (243)
College And Society (310)
College And The Economy (377)
College Applications (148)
College Benefits (290)
College Budgets (216)
College Classes (446)
College Costs (494)
College Culture (601)
College Goals (386)
College Grants (53)
College In Congress (88)
College Life (569)
College Majors (221)
College News (593)
College Prep (166)
College Savings Accounts (19)
College Scholarships (159)
College Search (115)
College Students (458)
College Tips (116)
Community College (59)
Community Service (40)
Community Service Scholarships (27)
Course Enrollment (19)
Economy (122)
Education (26)
Education Study (29)
Employment (42)
Essay Scholarship (38)
FAFSA (55)
Federal Aid (99)
Finances (70)
Financial Aid (415)
Financial Aid Information (58)
Financial Aid News (57)
Financial Tips (40)
Food (44)
Food/Cooking (27)
GPA (80)
Grades (91)
Graduate School (56)
Graduate Student Scholarships (20)
Graduate Students (65)
Graduation Rates (38)
Grants (62)
Health (38)
High School (130)
High School News (73)
High School Student Scholarships (184)
High School Students (310)
Higher Education (110)
Internships (526)
Job Search (178)
Just For Fun (115)
Loan Repayment (40)
Loans (48)
Military (16)
Money Management (134)
Online College (20)
Pell Grant (28)
President Obama (24)
Private Colleges (34)
Private Loans (19)
Roommates (100)
SAT (23)
Scholarship Applications (163)
Scholarship Information (179)
Scholarship Of The Week (271)
Scholarship Search (219)
Scholarship Tips (87)
Scholarships (403)
Sports (62)
Sports Scholarships (21)
Stafford Loans (24)
Standardized Testing (46)
State Colleges (42)
State News (34)
Student Debt (84)
Student Life (512)
Student Loans (140)
Study Abroad (67)
Study Skills (215)
Teachers (94)
Technology (111)
Tips (508)
Transfer Scholarship (16)
Tuition (93)
Undergraduate Scholarships (35)
Undergraduate Students (154)
Volunteer (45)
Work And College (83)
Work Study (20)
Writing Scholarship (18)

Categories

529 Plan (2)
Back To School (357)
College And The Economy (516)
College Applications (254)
College Budgets (343)
College Classes (566)
College Costs (751)
College Culture (937)
College Grants (133)
College In Congress (132)
College Life (963)
College Majors (331)
College News (920)
College Savings Accounts (57)
College Search (390)
Coverdell (1)
FAFSA (116)
Federal Aid (132)
Fellowships (23)
Financial Aid (705)
Food/Cooking (76)
GPA (277)
Graduate School (107)
Grants (72)
High School (540)
High School News (259)
Housing (172)
Internships (565)
Just For Fun (223)
Press Releases (1)
Roommates (138)
Scholarship Applications (223)
Scholarship Of The Week (347)
Scholarships (596)
Sports (74)
Standardized Testing (58)
Student Loans (225)
Study Abroad (61)
Tips (837)
Uncategorized (7)
Virtual Intern (532)

Archives

< Apr May 2015 Jun >
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
262728293012
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31123456

<< < 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22  > >>
Page 18 of 53