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Simplify Scholarship Essay Writing

Get Organized

When entering college scholarship essay contests, it is very important to practice sound organizational skills. Even though each scholarship application essay question will be different, there is certain information you are likely to need for several forms. It is in your best interest to pull relevant documents together and keep them in one place so you won’t have to keep digging up the same information over and over. Setting up a file for all of your scholarship application forms and the information needed to fill them out will go a long way toward helping simplify scholarship essay writing.

Each scholarship will have different requirements. For instance, the Rhodes Scholarship requires a 1,000-word essay in which you explain the reasons why you want to study at Oxford. No matter whether you are applying for a local scholarship or one as prestigious as the Rhodes Scholarship, it’s important to stay organized.

Organization Tips:

  • Avoid waiting until the last minute to complete scholarship applications.
  • Create a calendar of scholarship essay competition deadlines and check it regularly.
  • Draft a list of extracurricular activities and keep it updated.
  • Keep all scholarship application forms in a file.
  • Keep a copy of your most recent transcript in your file.
  • Make a list of names and contact information for people who can write recommendation letters for you.
  • Store your scholarship application essays on your computer and keep a back up copy on a CD or flash drive.

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