APSA Minority Fellowship Program

See Description For Amount

Deadline Varies

Awards Available: See Description

  • Scholarship Description
  • The Minority Fellows Program (MFP) is a fellowship competition for individuals from underrepresented backgrounds applying to or in the early stages of doctoral programs in political science. Eligible applicants must: be a racial minority; be a US citizen, US national, US permanent resident (holder of a Permanent Resident Card), or an individual granted deferred action status under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program (DACA) at the time of application; and, demonstrate an interest in teaching and potential for research in political science. Deadlines vary, depending on when you are applying for. For more information or to apply, please visit the scholarship provider's website.
  • Contact
  • Scholarship Committee
  • 1527 New Hampshire Ave. NW
  • Washington, DC 20036-1206
  • diversityprograms@apsanet.org
  • 202-483-2512

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Yahira N  on 8/11/2020 5:33:00 PM

I applied for this scholarship because I am currently a senior at Delano High School in Delano, CA. I am currently a health academy student and am studying to be a Medical Assistant student. For me being a part of this role rightnow as a highschool student means everything to my parents because they are immigrants and they left a family behind to bring there own family to the U.S and give us the most that they can. The past 25 years that they have been here consists of working in the grape vines all year round. As a daughter of immigrant parents it hurts to see your parents coming home exhausted and seeing how they struggle to pay things like bills and to simply buy things for us to eat. I have had to experience working in the fields for maybe 4 years now and it breaks my heart to see how they work and still manage to keep a smile on there faces, they come home with pain and act like nothings wrong. It would be a honor to win a scholarship so I could be able to go to college and give my parents the life they deserve and be a form of inspiration for my siblings.

prince b  on 11/1/2018 11:10:43 AM

so would someone pursuing a career as a lawyer be eligible for this?

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