Mensa Foundation Scholarship Program

See Description For Amount

January 15, 2020

Awards Available: See Description

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  • Scholarship Description
  • Each year the Mensa Foundation gives away an average of $90,000 through a scholarship program run by 400 volunteers from coast to coast; presents national and international awards in recognition of research, education and practical achievement regarding giftedness, intelligence and creativity.

    The Mensa Foundation's college scholarship program bases its awards totally on essays written by the applicants. Consideration is not given to grades, academic program or financial need. The U.S. scholarship program covers all of the country and awards more than $87,000 a year. U.S. applicants need not be Mensa members. Scholarships will vary in their eligibility requirements and award amount. For more information or to apply, please visit the scholarship provider's website.
  • Contact
  • Jill Beckham
  • 1229 Corporate Dr. W
  • Arlington, TX 76006
  • director@mensafoundation.org
  • tel: 817-607-5577
  • fax: 817-649-5232

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Comments (8)

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Mari S  on 12/11/2018 7:11:32 PM

What state can you apply?

Alexus H  on 12/7/2018 12:16:03 PM

can anyone apply for this scholarship?

Jamie C  on 11/5/2018 12:39:59 PM

I applied for this scholarship because I see that it's a great opportunity to get help with my schooling. I been working for the last 11years, and now I decided to come to college to better myself with a better career. As of now I'm unemployed. I'm a student who really is just focused on my school work.

Barbara L  on 9/24/2018 6:11:01 PM

Remember, this scholarship is available for students of any age, not just high school seniors. It's pretty rare to even find a scholarship once you're actually in college (other than those offered by the school). Plus, with one application, you're applying for multiple awards.

Tiffany L  on 8/22/2018 8:33:19 AM

This scholarship looks like an amazing opportunity. As a single mom, it’s been hard to put my education first. Now that my Daughter is older, it’s time for me to be able to achieve my education and career goals in my life! It’s hard raising a child all by myself, which is why I will need help in funding towards my education.

joseph v  on 8/6/2018 11:50:53 PM

I have not applied for this scholarship, primarily because, having spent months and months applying for other scholarships for which I seemed to qualify, I received none (other than those offered by my school), and I decided to focus on finishing my gap year productively and on preparing to attend college in the fall--in a word, on moving on. I recognize that the competition for college scholarships is intense, but I have found it surprising---and discouraging--to have: - worked my (excuse me, but) *butt* (no pun intended) off during high school, - been ranked in the top 3 percent of my graduating class, - won multiple national awards (including one given to just 2 students per state), - gotten perfect/near-perfect SAT scores, - done a varsity sport for 4 years, - tutored other students and worked as a TA, - received numerous academic awards, and *then*--during my gap year: - completed a research internship, - worked at a tutoring program for inner-city kids, - traveled, - attended a 2-week SBA program and then started a business, - volunteered to build houses in KY and to teach rowing to disabled individuals, - been selected for a highly competitive language-immersion program sponsored by the US Department of State to find that I received no scholarships. I realize now, in retrospect, that I perhaps if I had done some things differently--e.g., hired a college advisor (which my family couldn't afford)--and/or stood out more from the multitudes of other applicants, things might have gone differently. And, I've received a generous scholarship from the school I will be attending starting in a couple weeks, but I'm still worried about the cost of college and feel as if, given the number of what I sardonically call "medals" (i.e., awards and prizes) I have won, it's surprising that I haven't received more merit-based financial aid. If you have any suggestions for op

Roxanne D  on 8/3/2018 5:10:41 PM

Yes, I applied for this scholarship with an intended vision in the completion of my AA degree in Architecture Design. i am not an US citizen therefore i am seeking assistance with my tuition. i saw it as an great opportunity to apply.

Louise A  on 7/5/2018 11:57:36 AM

This scholarship looks like a good program, The reason I want this I want to better my self and do something that I would in joy. I need help to pay for my schooling.

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