Junior Year

Going to college improves earning potential and career satisfaction. To find the most appropriate schools and the best sources of financial aid, keep the following in mind.

SAT & ACT Testing

Complete the necessary requirements to take or retake the SAT or ACT tests. Take practice tests again before going to the exams to become familiar with the format of the questions.

Evaluate College Choices

Research academics and dorm life. Be prepared to identify what is important to you--a specific degree, a big city or small-town campus, a college that's close to home or one that’s far away, an atmosphere that's culturally diverse, a school with special recognition, etc.

Apply For Scholarships

College can be very expensive, and most students will need financial assistance to afford it. The more information one has about sources of college funding, the easier it may be to attend ones college of choice. Finding out how and where to search for grants, student loans, and scholarships can be extremely time consuming, and often ends with frustration. However, it doesn't have to be. Visit Scholarships.com to conduct a free college scholarship search, and take advantage of the financial aid information available to you at no charge. Begin early, and keep in mind that many scholarship and grant deadlines occur during the early part of a student’s senior year.

September/October

Discuss and review your coursework for the upcoming year. Ask your counselor to review your choices and to make sure that they will contribute to your college requirements. Register for the October PSAT. The PSAT qualifies students for the National Merit Scholarship Competition. With a high PSAT and SAT score, good grades, and a recommendation from high school, one may become a National Merit Scholarship Finalist. Finalists qualify not only for academic distinction, but also for scholarships.

November/December

Begin financial aid research by exploring grants, scholarships and work-study programs with college financial aid offices and with a high school counselor. Do research via the Internet.

Review PSAT test results with a guidance counselor. Consult with your guidance counselor about taking the ACT, SAT, or the SAT Subject Tests. Determine which tests are required at your colleges of interest.

Remember to obtain a social security number. If you do not have one, visit the closest Social Security office.

January/February

Prepare a preliminary list of colleges to investigate and possibly attend. Visit with a guidance counselor to discuss your list.

Write to the colleges on the list and ask for catalogues, community activity information, admissions literature and special financial aid options.

Register for the March SAT. Purchase an SAT prep guidebook and consider a prep course.

March/April

Check the SAT I, SAT Subject Test, and ACT test dates.

Begin to narrow list of colleges.

Consider summer plans: summer job, summer school, summer course or program at a local college.

May/June

Enroll in summer school, a course at a local college, apply for an internship, or work as a volunteer in your field of interest.

Review literature received from the colleges on short list. Pursue other information resources about these colleges. Visit the college's website.

Consider planning visits to colleges during the summer. Inquire about attending an interview. They book up quickly; set them up as early as possible.

July/August

Tour colleges and conduct interviews. Include family members or incorporate these visits with family's vacation plans. Plan fall visits, if necessary.

If you go on interviews or visits, don't forget to send thank you notes.

Begin preparation for the application process: assemble portfolios, collect writing samples, draft application essays, and, if applicable, contact the coaches at the college to inquire about athletic scholarships.

Latest College & Financial Aid News

College Professor Canned for Cussing

January 16, 2018

by Susan Dutca

A federal judge dismissed a civil rights lawsuit by a former LSU professor fired in 2015 for using vulgar language in her classroom. The formerly-tenured education professor alleged that LSU violated her First Amendment free speech rights and that their sexual harassment policies are unconstitutional. [...]

Berkeley Battling for Release of Luis Mora

January 9, 2018

by Susan Dutca

The University of California, Berkeley is working to end the detention of one of its undocumented students who was detained by the Department of Homeland Security after allegedly overstaying his visa. The university's chancellor and student activists are keen on "taking all appropriate actions to support the student's interests so that he may continue his studies and his life as a valued member of [the] community." [...]

Drexel Prof Resigns One Year After "White Genocide" Tweet

January 2, 2018

by Susan Dutca

A Drexel University Professor who tweeted, "All I want for Christmas is white genocide," recently resigned after a year of "enduring unrelenting harassment and death threats for his controversial tweets." According to Professor Ciccariello-Maher, the tweet was meant to be satirical, stating that white genocide is an "imaginary concept" used by the far right to scare white people. [...]

Last Reviewed: January 2018