Home > Financial Aid > Financial Aid Information > Federal Plus Loans Available To Graduate Students

Federal PLUS Loans Available to Graduate Students

Applying to graduate school is nerve-wracking. Not only is it hard to get accepted, but financial aid is harder to find. Government grants are not available to grad students, so costs make undergraduate tuition look like pocket change. Do not let the fear of debt overshadow your goals of attending graduate school. PLUS Loans, originally intended for parents, are available for graduate students. Prospective graduate students don’t need to visit loan sharks to meet their financial needs; graduate school is a realistic goal. Here are some things to know before applying for a PLUS Loan.

The Federal PLUS Loan at a Glance

PLUS Loans are insured student loans that come from the federal government’s Direct Loan Program. Like all other loans, these must be repaid. The interest rate for PLUS loans is a fixed 7.9%. Interest is charged from the date of the first disbursement until the loan is paid off.

How Much Can I Borrow?

Because the PLUS Loan is not based on financial need, you can borrow more money than need-based federal student loans. The amount of money you can borrow is based on the cost of attendance. Cost of attendance includes tuition, room and board, books, and some personal expenses. To calculate the amount to borrow, subtract your financial aid from the cost of attendance.

Similarities and Differences Between Parent and Student Borrowers

To take out a PLUS Loan, graduate students have similar conditions as parents of dependent students. To qualify, grad students must be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen, be enrolled at least half-time, and have good credit history. Graduate students with bad credit can apply with a cosigner.

There are a few differences between applying as a grad student vs. applying as a parent of a dependent student. For example, graduate students must submit their FAFSA information and have their maximum loan eligibility reassessed by the school before applying for the loan.

When Do I Repay The Loan?

Rules that applied to parents taking out PLUS Loans in the past are still intact. The payments for loans, including accumulated interest, start 60 days after the first disbursement. Consequently, parents pay for loans while the students are still in school. Graduate students can defer their payments until they graduate. Both parents and students taking out a PLUS Loan have up to 10 years to pay off the loans.

The costs of graduate school is difficult to swallow. PLUS Loans for graduate and professional students help make costs manageable. Saving money and taking out federal student loans is not always enough, and grad student regulations make financing college difficult. PLUS Loans will supplement financial aid if necessary, and be enough to make ends meet. If you got through undergrad, you can get through this.

Last Edited: December 2015

Latest College & Financial Aid News

BamaSits Protests Prompt BamaStands “Stand-Ups”

October 25, 2016

by Susan Dutca

Due to "ongoing racism" at the University of Alabama, students are choosing to remain seated during the national anthem at football games. Their #BamaSits demonstration is just one of the many thought to be motivated by similar protests by San Francisco 49ers QB Colin Kaepernick. #BamaSits protestors have cited their disapproval of "police violence against young black people" and the "racism [...]

“Just Do(nate) It”: Nike Co-Founder Gifts $500M to University of Oregon

October 18, 2016

by Susan Dutca

The generous $500 million gift from Phil and Penny Knight to the University of Oregon is the "largest ever for a public flagship institution" and is intended to support and strengthen interdisciplinary scientific research. With the donation, the university plans to extend its current science campus by 210,000 square feet, with three new research facilities. The initiative is expected to create [...]

A Second Chance for Former Prisoners, Gang Members

October 11, 2016

by Susan Dutca

One nonprofit is heavily recruiting reformed delinquents from disadvantaged communities and funneling them into college. The troubled youth - many of whom have committed crimes and have been in jail, are given personal advisers, free college-prep courses, childcare, bus passes and other forms of support to keep off the streets. College Bound Dorchester has enrolled about 130 students over the [...]

Follow Us:

facebook twitter rss feed