“Sexting” Education Curriculum Implemented in LA Schools


July 14, 2015
by Scholarships.com Staff
For the first time this fall, high school students in the Los Angeles, California area will be participating in a new addition to the curriculum, “Sext” Education.  KNX 1070’s Mark Austin Thomas reports the L.A. Unified School District has put together a plan that will educate students on the dangers of sharing sexually-explicit photos via texting and the Internet.  Each school in the district will receive lesson plans, supplemented by videos and handouts for the students.

For the first time this fall, high school students in the Los Angeles, California area will be participating in a new addition to the curriculum, “Sext” Education. KNX 1070’s Mark Austin Thomas reports the L.A. Unified School District has put together a plan that will educate students on the dangers of sharing sexually-explicit photos via texting and the Internet. Each school in the district will receive lesson plans, supplemented by videos and handouts for the students.

A 2011 national Pew survey found that, while only 3 percent of teens with cellphones sent naked or near-naked photos or videos of themselves, 21 percent of teens ages 14-17 claimed they had received them. District Police Chief Steven Zipperman says the campaign will teach students about violations of child pornography and obscenity laws that can come with sexting, along with the personal consequences. The primary focus of the effort is to get students to really think before they hit “send”.

Holly Priebe-Diaz, the District’s intervention coordinator, believes “We don’t have the exact number on how big or how widespread the problem is specific to our district, but we do know that I’s a growing trend. So we want to try to get ahead of it and raise awareness for all of our students.”

Texas Professor, Jeff Temple who has co-authored a sexting study, hopes the curriculum gives facts without exaggerating the risks of sexting, and emphasized the importance of consent.

Do you think "Sext" education classes are inappropriate to implement in a high school curriculum? Have you been a part of, or witnessed a scenario where "sexting" became a problem?

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Discuss

Share your thoughts and perhaps thousands of students will benefit from your unique insight on the subject!



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Brooke D  on  9/3/2015 8:01:26 AM commented:

There should not just be a class about sexting, it should be a lesson in the general sex ed class. I feel they shouldn't also make sex seem horrible but be honest with the children. You tell a child not to do something they are gonna do it. And if they are going to do teach them the ways to be safe. Protect themselves. A baby is a wonderful thing, but it can put a hold on your life until you can't start to get a career. STD is not wonderful, is not nice to have, so teach them! Kids seems not to know enough information about sex, all the precautions etc. Give them a baby and a partner to raise the kid together. Give them a feel.

Sarah B.  on  8/13/2015 4:53:15 AM commented:

I agree that his should be taught in high school curriculum but sexting by sending nude photos should not be the only subject covered. There are other forms of sexting suck as dirty rps. These are still harmful to s teens health and if they were to be release could have many consequences. So I do believe that sexting and its consequences should be taught in schools, but it should be taught from more then once perspective. Not just typical sexting because not every teen does that who participates in that type of behavior.

Taylor Y.  on  8/5/2015 4:16:42 PM commented:

Let me assure you, there is no innocent party when it comes to sexting. You can blame the boy, sure, he knows what he wants; but it is 100 percent equally the girl's fault. Children and adults understand that it's wrong to send sexts, so ascribing victimhood to the girls who participate is flatly spurious. Do nice girls in relationships ever get taken advantage of? Yes. But they are the fringe of the fringe and should be regarded so properly. The majority of sexters are whores and creeps. If added to the curriculum, sexting should take no more than a day. There are more important things to learn about the human anatomy, virology, parenting and the rest.

Kayla s  on  7/21/2015 1:01:04 PM commented:

i agree this should be part of the general sex Ed classes not separated

Michael.K  on  7/21/2015 9:27:23 AM commented:

i find the the curriculum shouldn't be separated from general sex Ed.

Jayme D  on  7/20/2015 3:55:14 PM commented:

So many teens think it's just a small act that won't get any further than the person they are sending it too. And Social media has become so sexualized this day in age that children younger and younger feel that it is okay to be so pervogative. We need to educate the kids that there are better ways to "fit in" to today's society or how to help them be a better them. New and effective instruction, something to help them understand, because it's not like kids don't know what sexting is and the dangers of it, they just choose to do so anyway. that helps them understand. Possibly, leaders of this program could demonstrate how easy it is for pedophiles to hack into your device and steal your photos and post them to child pornography websites. How the owner of the device will never know it's even being done, but educating the children on how simple gateways such as connecting to wifi in public places are their hunting grounds.

Matthew Edwards  on  7/20/2015 2:50:47 PM commented:

Establishing Sext Education classes is a great idea. Regardless of whether or not certain students are looking to receive or send these types of pictures, anytime they give there number to someone, there is a possibility of receiving a sexually provocative message or image. Many students don't know how to respond such situations, and don't know the laws surrounding such issues. I think the most important thing to communicate to these students is the dangers of sending these messages, and the social, legal, and professional consequences that are likely to result.

Cooper W.  on  7/20/2015 2:44:00 PM commented:

Though I agree that this should be taught in schools, we need to make sure that we teach it correctly. We need factual lessons based purely on law and maybe a class debate about personal choice so people don't feel like this is akin to the hellfire style abstinence teaching that I remember so clearly from health class. That form of sex education is truly not effective, as evidenced by the high rate of teen pregnancy and STD infections in areas that don't teach contraception.

Brittany R.  on  7/20/2015 7:59:18 AM commented:

As a recent high school graduate, I can not say how helpful the classes will be if implemented in schools but I can tell you how extremely necessary they are. In my school alone I know of at least 15 people who got suspended at one point for sexting in school and had their phones taken by administration. On countless occasions our Student Resource Officer came into our classes and talked about how important it was to respect yourself enough to not sext. I think these courses are vital to educating our upcoming generations because our generation now is so unaware of how harmful those pictures can be to them for their entire life.

Miranda F.  on  7/18/2015 9:48:02 PM commented:

I personally do not deal with that kind of situation. I think it is very immature and scary, honestly. You don't know who can get ahold of the pictures or where they will end up. That being said, I know teenagers who don't care if they are talked to about abstinence and other sex-related topics. Teens will be teens and classes/assemblies won't inspire them enough to change the way they want to do things. High schoolers are stubborn and they aren't going to let educators prevent them from what they want. I wish people were that easy to persuade, but society just isn't at that point yet, sadly.

Sara Brigida  on  7/17/2015 8:35:04 PM commented:

I believe that "sext" education classes should be implemented in a high school curriculum because many students are unaware of the consequences that can follow one unwise decision.

Kayla J.  on  7/17/2015 6:51:01 PM commented:

Teenage pregnancy, & humiliation regarding sexual activities has become very common in my area. There are lots of scenarios where people I know, or know of have been embarrassed via social media. The power of technology today is tremendous. This is why it is important to be aware of the dangers when using our devices. By implementing a class on “sexting”, students can get first-hand knowledge on the topic. I have many friends who seek guidance, and I feel that this is the proper way. Most teens dread the “birds and the bees” talk with their parents so I'm sure this would be a better alternative.

Ingo s  on  7/17/2015 4:26:31 PM commented:

parents need to focus ontheir job of raising children. that includes everything. the children without the proper role models at home won't really be concerned about someone trying to teach them something at scbool. all responsibilityseems to go out the windowas soonas they buy theirchild a cell phone. how hadcanit be to get a cell phone that is only a phone? it's not. Know your kids. Know who their friends are, understand what they value...seriously all it takes is some communication. you can't are the authority away from the teachers and then expect them to raise your children.

Alaycia Clark  on  7/17/2015 10:26:08 AM commented:

I just recently graduated from high school and I have witnessed many girls and boys receive and have sent a naked picture of someone or themselves. The outcome of this was everybody else saw it most likely and likelyon a rare occasion a teacher saw it. The kids around you will gossip about you for months maybe even years and that will make you feel less about yourself. A teacher suspended three students for this type of scenario. One was the sender, the other was the receiver, and the last one was the gossiper. Almost never graduated because of this incident. If a sexting curriculum took place it could help reduce these odds and scenarios. If they work then great but it is going to take some time for a student to listen to this. So goodluck

Alaycia Clark  on  7/17/2015 10:23:46 AM commented:

I just recently graduated from high school and I have witnessed many girls and boys receive and have sent a naked picture of someone or themselves. The outcome of this was everybody else saw it most likely and likelyon a rare occasion a teacher saw it. The kids around you will gossip about you for months maybe even years and that will make you feel less about yourself. A teacher suspended three students for this type of scenario. One was the sender, the other was the receiver, and the last one was the gossiper. Almost never graduated because of this incident. If a sexting curriculum took place it could help reduce these odds and scenarios. If they work then great but it is going to take some time for a student to listen to this. So goodluck

Alaycia Clark  on  7/17/2015 10:15:23 AM commented:

I don't think sext education classes are inappro

Derek P.Q.  on  7/16/2015 10:49:07 AM commented:

As it is becoming a growing issue especially here in the United States, "sexting" has caused many children, more specifically ones in adolescence or about to enter that stage, to be publicly embarrassed. As an adolescence myself, I have seen multiple instances of peer pressure causing other teenagers to do regretful things. We are generally considered still immature with many instances of poor decision-making, but, since we are so heavily influenced by our peers, it would be more logical to cause larger groups to convince other people not to sext. It has been noted that not all educational classes trying to prevent regretful decisions work. A class for sexting is really a waste of money and a waste of time to students who have higher morals and less susceptible to sexting. The class will most likely not be taken seriously. Other approaches should be taken to try to rid the world of this ridiculous matter, but "sext" education will be one of the least effective ones.

Jenna S.  on  7/16/2015 2:05:12 AM commented:

So parents buy their kid a cellphone, and it is the schools responsibility to educate them on the dangers of sexting? I'm sorry, but I think this is crossing the line a bit far. I think maybe having a section on it in sexual education classes would be beneficial, though an entire curriculum? Why should this responsibility be taken away from the parent, and placed upon a teacher? Teachers already have so much on their plates. Also, It is important to note that it has been proven in studies that scare tactics used on adolescents DO NOT WORK. Most kids come out of things like that thinking that they are either invincible and it will never happen to them, or they think "gee all of my peers are doing this, I should be doing it too!". Maybe we should focus instead on how parents are not educated enough of the dangers of sexting, RESULTING in their children not knowing the dangers of sexting.

Sydney S  on  7/15/2015 10:35:57 PM commented:

Sex education in schools is, in my opinion, not taught correctly. As a rising senior, my time in health class did not teach me what I should have learned. A class that not only acknowledges sex in its many different forms but teaches the problems with it and how to avoid them provides a line of communication so students are stuck researching their questions on the Internet. We can't pretend like these things don't happen and teaching about it in schools provides the opportunity for all to listen and learn.

Jacque C.  on  7/15/2015 2:23:26 PM commented:

Personally, I think this is a step forward in protecting our children & raising their awareness. My own son is 14 years old & has not only distributed but also received explicit images & engaged in obscene conversations that borderlined verbal assault. Some of these girls my son was talking to would self-harm & send those images to my son. I tried to inform my ex-husband but it was not a concern for him. With some help from TeenSafe.com I was able to notify the authorities & make my son accountable & aware that this is not appropriate behavior for his age. My son is lucky that it's not 2 years ago, or he would've had to register as a sex-offender. In our state this behavior is a misdemeanor & he received probation & community service, if he does everything as indicated these wrong choices will not follow him into adulthood.

Jennifer S.  on  7/15/2015 12:15:56 PM commented:

I don't know if this is good or bad! Some teens will learn from it and others won't. They should know the danger of it all. We should give them all the facts so that they will make a good decision am let them know it's in the cloud and people won't hire them.

Jamee M  on  7/15/2015 12:14:46 PM commented:

So many teens are often plagued by unwanted photos or pressure from others to send these photos. The education is a needed thing. People children especially, need to know that sending things like that is not only dangerous, but also illegal. It's not like we have any sort of legitimate sexual education courses. People need to be taught in an appropriate setting. The "Health" class that we have today is a huge joke. In high school I took that class for about three days before I realized that I absolutely did not need that class. We had quizzes with questions like, "Why do we need to eat?". It's ridiculous. Sexting class or some sort of sexual education class is only one thing that is needed in the American education system. There are many improvements to be made.

Rachel G  on  7/15/2015 10:44:40 AM commented:

I agree that today's youth need to understand what the very real consequences of sexting are. Including how easy it is to become a victim. However, I don't think it should be taught in school. Especially when America has so much catching up with the rest of the world when it comes to the education system. I believe that if we want to pour more money into education then it should be on new textbooks, better training for teachers or extra resources that help the students, like updated computers and tutors. Since when did we decide to take parenting away from the home and put it in the hands of our teachers. The unfortunate reality is that some parents won't inform their children about the dangers of sexting and many are probably in denial that there child would do such a thing. But again I must stress that the education system already has it's hands full. If you're going to talk about sexting at all why not just focus one day on it in a normal sex ed class. Instead of wasting money.

Roger C.  on  7/15/2015 10:31:27 AM commented:

This is trash education that has no read purpose.

Christy T  on  7/15/2015 10:07:49 AM commented:

Bravo!! This is great! The youth today do need to know the consequences of this growing trend. As a mother I applaud you. My teen was not given this awareness, and is currently suffering consequences from this widespread trend amongst our youth.

Kat T.  on  7/15/2015 9:16:44 AM commented:

So much of "education" today is passed off as "necessary" when in fact it is parents who have abrogated their true responsibility in caring for and educating their own children. What are the actual statistics with the "DARE" program? As one commenter noted, these types of "education" programs merely inform the uninitiated and tempts them to "try" this new thing. The best idea I read in the comments is to incorporate something into the health class curriculum; mainly delineating the dangers/consequences of bowing to peer pressure in the particular area of sexting. It is sad to note that our youth today have been abandoned by their parents and so much time/money is spent on vain attempts to train the heart while intellect is left to waste. The hand that rocks the cradle is the hand that rules the world; parents have neglected their most important "job".

Sedasia T  on  7/15/2015 7:41:15 AM commented:

Actually, I haven't witnessed it but I do know that it goes on also I think schools should offer sexting classes because you can get in a lot of trouble of someone finds them, I believe you can got to jail for child pornography even if your under the age of consent. I would personally say high school students need to be more informative about this situation because the person receiving these picture can do anything with them and that can distroy someone so I would think that a sexting class would make them want to do it less and not regret anything in there high school career.

Fiona H  on  7/15/2015 2:25:40 AM commented:

As a recently graduated high school student, I think this program is a wonderful idea. Teenagers should be aware about who they can trust and who they can send certain things too. I once read an article about a little girl who wasn't educated on sexting, how it could ruin her life, and sent a photo to a boy she trusted. Of course that boy wasn't to be trusted and posted that photo of her everywhere and the poor girl commited suicied. I beileve girls and boys should be aware of sexting and on who they should trust when it comes to sexting or even sex. This program will definitely send awareness to teenagers about thinking before they hit "send".

Gina h  on  7/15/2015 12:15:02 AM commented:

That is great, because most girls when they send pictures have been pressured by there boyfriends to so. Their is a lot more young people that are doing this and it is a very big issue. Also when a girl sends a picture of her self, a minor, she is distributing child pornography. Now if the guy is dumb enough to share that picture witb his friends he to is distributing child pornography. Middle school students do this all the time and it is a growing fad among young people these day and definitely something that needs to be taught the consequences of. I think it is a great idea because when i was in middle school i made those same mistakes and regreted it so much and i wish i would have been educated about it

Zharia H  on  7/14/2015 11:55:42 PM commented:

Having "Sext" education classes are a good idea because it will be a class that most students will be interested in. It will make them think twice before sending inappropriate pictures to other people. I have been around to see how sexting has became a problem in our society. A lot of people are making pages on social media to expose the people that have or still are sexting.

Maalson N  on  7/14/2015 11:48:54 PM commented:

I think it about time something is being done about this issue. Most of the time when people hear "sexting" they automatically think of adults. Kids of this generation are exposed to way more technology than 20 years ago. As kids, we are curious. When you combine this curiosity and all the elements kids are exposed to, it only makes sense that issues such as sexting will arise. This program that L.A. is starting is a beacon for other schools and states to recognize this issue and take action.

Elizabeth C.  on  7/14/2015 11:18:51 PM commented:

I do not believe it is necessary to have an entire curriculum portrayed just on this subject. it is a good idea to have them aware of this trend that is going around and the consequences. Maybe having an assembly gathering the students around for awhile will be better than a whole class.

Jordyn C  on  7/14/2015 10:21:40 PM commented:

In my opinion with me just getting out of high school I personally say that this is a great idea but should be done within the health classes. In health they learn about peer pressure and that is where they can simply be taught about sexting because most girls feel like they are pressured into hitting that sent button on their phones. Everyone can s say that it will be a good move to do that but then again there are others who know the consequences and still do it. We don't know why they do it but they do. Having that class is also not going to make people confess of what they do because they know is wrong. We as being the aka all we can do is reach them if what we know and how they can handle situations like that but who are we to say that it will decrease the numbers of child pornography.

Becca R  on  7/14/2015 10:16:57 PM commented:

i think this is great. I will be the first to admit, I've made quite a few mistakes with sexting. I was never caught but it led to a lot of social issues in middle school and freshman-sophomore year on high school. I feel like if there was curriculum set up in my school district earlier, I would have probably thought twice about sending pictures. To the girls reading this, don't ever feel like you have to sent a boy pictures of yourself. He isn't worth it.

alisa p  on  7/14/2015 10:01:10 PM commented:

i am a parent of teen girls,and two young adults. i think emma k. is correct almost all teens have heard about the dangers and choose to ignore it. a class would be a waste of money. however maybe someone from the police department coming in to do a one time program might be appropriate,especially if they speak about the legal consequences of having pictures of underage individuals on their phones or computers. but s full curriculumn to cover it would fall on deaf ears or peak interest in those teens who havent done it yet.

Liz  on  7/14/2015 9:35:55 PM commented:

The only reason this is a problem is because we don't have the proper education in our schools that will teach us this. Even when schools do have sex ed, or assembly for this. they only give us certain information on sex.

Alyson C.  on  7/14/2015 9:25:22 PM commented:

As a 23 year-old, I do think it is a good thought and it certainly has good intentions, but it really depends on the approach. If it's just a simple talk, no one will listen. If you bring some sort of illustration (no not the actual pictures themselves), but of what happens as a result of texting, then it may wake some kids up. I'll put it to you this way, when we had a speaker come talk to us about not using drugs in high school, he brought the mother of someone who died from using drugs, as well as pictures of kids who had died from ODing, and we aren't just talking about their high school pictures. I'm talking about the gruesome pictures showing where they shot up, what they looked like when they died. Believe me it was a very sobering meeting. Bring reality to them. It's nothing pretty.

Jessica M.  on  7/14/2015 8:52:29 PM commented:

I think it will be a good program. Not only is it considered child pornography it also can hit many viewers in a matter of seconds.

Catherine S  on  7/14/2015 8:16:42 PM commented:

I believe that while personal, and sometimes awkward to talk about, sexting is a growing issue, especially today when teens have access to snapchat, an app where photos can "disappear" after 10 seconds and secret photo vault apps disguised as calculators that parents won't suspect even if they check they're kids phones. It is indeed a morals thing, and I think teens really should think more before doing something illegal about that, and it helps to be educated about it. After all, we're already educated about sex, rape, prostitution, domestic abuse and other issues. Sexting is a very important issue that teens need to know about.

October S.  on  7/14/2015 7:55:09 PM commented:

I encourage them to go forth with this program and implement it nationwide. Then maybe our younger generations may grow up a bit more respectable and respectful. Everybody may have different morals and beliefs, but my son will not be raised to treat his body as a billboard unless it's for a damn good cause. BRING IT TO TEXAS.

Anna R  on  7/14/2015 7:45:36 PM commented:

If 3% sent pictures, and 21% received them... Where did all the other pictures come from?!

Daniel J  on  7/14/2015 7:17:10 PM commented:

The parents need to take some responsibility as well as the youth.

Venica C  on  7/14/2015 7:16:44 PM commented:

This is actually a great idea! It'll teach children that's young like freshmans a good lesson on why sexting is a bad idea & what it would be like if they did do it , that way they won't have any ideas or bad thoughts , because some kids actually do commit suicide when things like this happen , and I think kids should know the consequences & how it makes others feel when they send them something they thought they could trust the other person with .

marie b  on  7/14/2015 7:11:37 PM commented:

Well I guess parents are obsolete, really, now the school is expanding sex ed, hmmmm how @ the school sending the curriculum home and let the whole family discuss or better yet why doesn't the school district of which I was subject to try teaching the basics for a change. Is LA Unified a health clinic? How about teaching your students to think intelligently. If teens can google how to get through levels in video games they are smart enough to understand the consequences of sexting. Teens are not stupid they just make foolish decisions, just like adults. Here's some free curriculum, make a school announcement: Everything you do or say online is like a billboard in the middle of Time Square, it will affect the rest of your life and follow you wherever you go. Take the risk and risk your future. How about the school teaching kids how to learn instead of treating them like a social program for a change. Schools are so effective in preventing behaviors, right?

Lindsay G  on  7/14/2015 6:47:37 PM commented:

I think that this is a waste of money. Most all teens know what could happen if they sext and a class is not going to prevent students who would have sent inappropriate pictures before the class from sending inappropriate pictures after the class. Students realize the consequences already.

Raquel B  on  7/14/2015 6:00:12 PM commented:

I agree with Hanna D. I grew up in a strict and hushed family. The topic of sex overall was frowned upon, so I had to get most of my information that was not filtered with values and beliefs from school. I think it's a good idea to teach teenagers what would be expected if a situation like that happens. Then again I do agree with Emma K at that age some are not listening or understanding the concequences from sexting.

Breonna W  on  7/14/2015 5:31:41 PM commented:

I believe that this will be a great program because if anyone didn't notice, if any teen 18 or younger could go to jail for sending that to whoever that their sending the pic too. Not only that, but, you could go to jail for the mistake that you made, and you could be labeled as a sex offender. I know this cause I know someone who almost got in trouble for that mistake. Another thing is that, don't believe what some guys might say just to try to get you to do that.

Lindsay w  on  7/14/2015 5:23:23 PM commented:

I think that it is completely appropriate. High school students don't understand the severity of their actions and should be informed of the laws involving their actions. Maybe it should be required workshop instead of a full class. Underage setting is the distribution of child pornography and I don't think underage sisters understand that. It is also promoting inappropriate interactions between these sexters and their peers. If a young girl sends a nude photo of herself to her boyfriend believing only he will view it and that boyfriend send that picture to the whole school then it could lead to some traumatic events for that young girl. It could lead to bullying and sexual harassment.

Brandon S  on  7/14/2015 5:19:19 PM commented:

I personally don't think a sext education is going to help… I am in high school currently and honestly if that was added to the curriculum, I would just laugh at the class. Nobody is going to listen to these people, and those who do listen won't be taking anything seriously. I recommend just dropping the idea and dealing with the fact that teenagers are going to do what teenagers are going to do. Logically, if sext education is a necessity, then party education is a necessity, and homework education is a necessity, and so on and so forth. Teenagers are generally stupid, so I doubt trying to get through their thick skulls is going to work. In fact, some will openly defy you with the logic "they told me not to. I'll show them that they aren't the boss of me." And they'll do it anyway. Just leave them to their own problems. They'll learn eventually.

avery v  on  7/14/2015 5:09:43 PM commented:

Sext is a form of porn. There is no need to waste money on this when it can be used somewhere else productive. They know what are doing they just don't care. It is just a game to them but some games are deadly in the wrong hands.

Andrea P  on  7/14/2015 5:05:47 PM commented:

To be completely honest. Anyone who reveals themselves on the Internet has to realize that it's the same as revealing themselves out in public. The Internet is still a mystery, so even if you mean to talk to one person, there could be others who are there looking, without being seen

Derrisl  on  7/14/2015 5:02:41 PM commented:

I do believe that sexting is inappropriate for high school education and have not been personally involved. Students who make bold decisions such as posting naked or near-naked pictures on social media or the internet must think before they act. They want acceptance but they are going about it the wrong way. Having a good reputation can be shattered by these kind of decisions. Regret and disappointment only follows.

Briauna H.  on  7/14/2015 4:57:13 PM commented:

This program is a great idea. There's such thing as sex education. This program is just another way of keeping our future safe.

Ryan M  on  7/14/2015 4:37:33 PM commented:

Great program.. This will prevent guys from losing their jobs later in life due to sending some dumb wiener pic text to a money hungry harlot.

Hannah D  on  7/14/2015 4:37:32 PM commented:

I believe that it is a good idea to teach students the dangers of sexting, yet I don't think having a class that solely covers that particular topic is necessary. Instead, the LA area could implement a unit on sexting into their health class curriculum. I have witnessed a scenario where a girl sexted a boy and her pictures were sent to multiple people within a couple days. Students need to realize how easy it is to click the send button on an image that could ultimately impact you in the long run.

Emma K  on  7/14/2015 4:31:31 PM commented:

In my opinion, I'm a teenager myself and there's a speaker that comes to my school every year. While I do think it's important, I also think the majority of the student don't listen. I feel like they here these type of things all the time, that they get used to it and don't care. So for me I feel it's a waste of money to try to teach all of these students the safety of sexting, when they have heard it all before. I myself have had a friend who sexts to random people she dosen't know and have tried everything to stop her from doing it. At the end of the day she still does it, no matter how many people tell her don't. That's an example on how I know how some cases where you try to help don't always work out.

Ramirez  on  7/14/2015 4:27:44 PM commented:

It is not a problem until it causes cyber bullying or in fact any kind of bullying. As a teen I have knowledge upon this topic since most of my friends went through this. Not only can it cause bullying but can also lead to the pressure of getting physically intimate. In my opion I believe there should be classes for this as warnings to what could happen right when you send one or receive one.

Charlene C.  on  7/14/2015 4:26:09 PM commented:

In my opinion, I think that this program is great to have at school. People view it as inappropriate, but teens do a lot of inappropriate things anyway. This takes something inappropriate, and turns it into something positive to educate youths on the danger of sexting and the risks associated with it. It will prove really helpful since in the district there it is becoming a trend. I think there's nothing harmful about it.

Madisyn F  on  7/14/2015 4:25:56 PM commented:

Things like "sexting" have become overwhelmingly common these days. It's about time schools acknowledge the danger of it and teach kids that this kind of communication is belittling and inappropriate.

Brandon r  on  7/14/2015 4:18:00 PM commented:

I believe the real danger here are some of the people you have to be careful about, more than the act of it.

Kayla b  on  7/14/2015 4:09:39 PM commented:

Every child is different. Some parents already inform their children of these types of sex, but having a school tach the facts makes it more real for the child. Most kids don't even know that you can get a fine and go to jail because of it. I think we should defiantly have this class

Colina Jeanlouis  on  7/14/2015 4:08:47 PM commented:

I would say show them the effects of sexting and or have a dark room full of boys or girls and have them step into another room and listen to people reaction on how they would deal with sexting . and see what they would do . I think that would work .

Charlene C.  on  7/14/2015 3:48:37 PM commented:

In my opinion, I think that this program is great to have at school. People view it as inappropriate, but teens do a lot of inappropriate things anyway. This takes something inappropriate, and turns it into something positive to educate youths on the danger of sexting and the risks associated with it. It will prove really helpful since in the district there it is becoming a trend. I think there's nothing harmful about it.

Tori F.  on  7/14/2015 3:06:49 PM commented:

While I personally believe the topic of sexting is vastly inappropriate for a school to be educating their students on there are a few reasons this could be necessary. So many parents in this day and age are trying to be laid back, unintrusive and "cool" and ultimately allow their teenagers to run rampant or get involved with the wrong people. On the other hand there are the parents that don't know how to bring the subject up or how to deal with a situation in which they find out their child was sexting. I was fortunate enough to have a mother who has always been very involved in my life, willing to educate me or answer any questions I have and taught me early on about how my actions can effect me. Despite what the survey says about how many teenagers are sending or receiving sexts or sexually explicit pictures I have reason to believe it is substantially higher based on the people I have known throughout high school and after. A majority of people I have met would not own up to sexting, sending explicit pictures or being sexually active on a survey or to someone who could tell their parents. People throughout highschool and my first year of college would brag about sexting and sending/receiving sexually explicit pictures, especially on snapchat because the picture/conversation "only lasts for 10 seconds". I believe educating teenagers on the fact that nothing put out on the internet ever really goes away, not being pressured into participating, how to protect themselves and even how to handle a situation gone wrong if they do decide to participate in sexting could be helpful because so many people think it's a social norm, it "isn't a big deal" and don't realize the repercussions of their actions.

Britt C.  on  7/14/2015 3:01:14 PM commented:

i think this is a very good topic to teach to help kids avoid becoming victims of participating in sexting. Also Cheryl, given that Satan represents all things bad in the world it is very interesting you would want to be part of such a group.

Alana R  on  7/14/2015 2:53:00 PM commented:

I think that a "sext" education is a great idea. For the most part the little that we are taught on the topic of sex don't even get near this huge topic. So many high schoolers send and recieve sexts and by starting a conversation on the issues with sexting we are opening up a conversation and making so many people aware of the problems with sexting as well as the safety that goes along with it. Overall i think it is a great idea.

Stephanie N  on  7/14/2015 2:51:00 PM commented:

Today, these students are growing up in a different society than what has ever been considered the "norm" and I believe this type of education would be beneficial to these young teens. It would be a mind opener for them to know what the repercussions would be if they decide to partake in "sexting."

Cristal G.  on  7/14/2015 2:49:15 PM commented:

Setting can turn into blackmail and bullying in a touch of a button. The youth of today don't necessarily understand the magnitude of the issue. While I may be encouraged to argue that instead of teaching kids not to sext, we should promote societal equity and open-mindedness; we should however push the youth about personal values and virtues such as self respect. I'm glad LAUSD has taken matters onto their own hands and is providing sexting classes. I can see many arguments between students, teachers and even parents, but at the end it's for the better.

Cheryl O.  on  7/14/2015 2:47:15 PM commented:

This sounds ridiculous to be honest. I mean making a big deal over sexting, add to that the punishments associated with the possible consequences of getting " caught" and it all seems stupid. As an agnostic-atheist and a Satanist-a member of The Satanic Temple, I must say that this is nothing but more of the same Christofascist moral "guilt" BS that has plagued the mentalities of America's uptight, conservative parents for years. That and the fact that nobody should be punished by law for any form of consensual sexuality, or anything that does not constitute a violent crime in any way. In the more intelligent countries over in Europe, The Netherlands and Denmark, for example, consensual sexuality in any form is not a crime. Rather, it is no big deal. That said, why not focus on academics and more important stuff than focus on teaching America's teens more Christofascist moral garbage!

Priscilla M  on  7/14/2015 2:36:29 PM commented:

even though it seems that everyone should know the trouble of sexting, the truth is that some teens still don't understand the consequences of this matter. I believe educating in regards to sexting can always be beneficial, and it would be a great resource for teens.

Dwight K.  on  7/14/2015 2:26:15 PM commented:

While this does carry a good message about sexting and the presence of child pornography. The fact it is against the law and a felony is good to address ,. All this boils down to poor boundaries taught to the child, along with how long term consequences will affect their future.

Brittany stanton  on  7/14/2015 2:23:15 PM commented:

I think it is not inappropriate because it can teach high school kids about how dangerous sexting can be. Also how it can be shared online or even used as blackmail or against someone.

Latisha F  on  7/14/2015 2:23:05 PM commented:

A sexting class will be very beneficial to teach students the consequences of th see actions. This will help establish a better knowledge of this whole sextinn wide mic and hopefully prevent it from continuing on to the later generation.

Chiterra P.  on  7/14/2015 2:18:04 PM commented:

This is a problem that certainly needed addressing.

Toan B Le  on  7/14/2015 2:11:22 PM commented:

I really this scholarship to accomplis my goals and dreams, I have taken my hard classes and a lot of homework that I do not have time to find a job. i really need it

Kimberly J.  on  7/14/2015 2:08:02 PM commented:

I don't think its wrong. We should all know what the consequences are of sexting and not only that, everyone should be aware of the dangers of it as well and there's no better way than an actual class where we can talk about it.

Sam L  on  7/14/2015 2:05:37 PM commented:

Im a 17 year old at williamsville north high School, personally I have never been involved in the "sexting" epidemic but I know all about the dangers of it. I think it would be a very very very important lesson to teach teenagers, especially kids coming out of Middle School and into High School.

Victor S  on  7/14/2015 2:05:34 PM commented:

I think they should make a class about this in high school,because teenagers need to know what could happen if you sext.

 E-tail giant Amazon is now accepting applications to its Amazon Future Engineer Scholarship Program for students entering college in the fall of 2020. The scholarship program offers 100 current high school seniors from underserved and underrepresented communities across the country the opportunity to receive $40,000 scholarships to study computer science at a four-year college or university and a guaranteed paid internship offer at Amazon after the completion of their first year.

Amazon Offers $40K Future Engineer Scholarships

November 6, 2019 1:41 PM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
E-tail giant Amazon is now accepting applications to its Amazon Future Engineer Scholarship Program for students entering college in the fall of 2020. The scholarship program offers 100 current high
In response to the NCAA's vote to allow athletes to profit from their names, images and likeness, Senator Richard Burr of North Carolina has proposed taxing those scholarships. Senator Burr tweeted: If college athletes are going to make money off their likenesses while in school, their scholarships should be treated like income. I'll be introducing legislation that subjects scholarships given to athletes who choose to 'cash in' to income taxes.

NC Senator Proposes Taxing of Athletic Scholarships

October 31, 2019 4:02 PM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
In response to the NCAA's vote to allow athletes to profit from their names, images and likeness, Senator Richard Burr of North Carolina has proposed taxing those scholarships. Senator Burr tweeted:
Gucci is releasing a new line of... diversity undergraduate scholarships for students who are traditionally underrepresented in the fashion industry. The 1.5 million U.S. university college scholarship program is set to run for four years, targeting students who attend four-year universities. Special consideration will be given to those residing in Atlanta, Chicago, Detroit, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New Orleans, New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Toronto and Washington, D.C and/or for those who plan to attend or are currently attending a Historically Black College and University (HBCU).

Gucci Gaffe Results in Green for Grads

October 8, 2019 2:28 PM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
Gucci is releasing a new line of... diversity undergraduate scholarships for students who are "traditionally underrepresented in the fashion industry." The 1.5 million U.S. university college
Not every student who goes to college completes their degree, much less finishes it within the normal four-year time frame. The Texas of A&M University has spent years working to re-enroll students who stopped out of college for a year or more, and may have found a solution in partnering with ReUp Education.

Texas A&M Working to Re-enroll College Stopouts

September 26, 2019 2:15 PM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
Not every student who goes to college completes their degree, much less finishes it within the "normal" four-year time frame. The Texas of A&M University has spent years working to re-enroll students
 Photo credit: Jared Ames

A new PBS documentary exhibiting prison education, titled College Behind Bars is set to air on November 25 and 26. The four-part series documents the journeys of dozens of incarcerated men and women as they pursue college degrees in the Bard Prison Initiative - deemed one of the most rigorous prison education programs in the United States, according to Inside Higher Ed.

PBS Airs Documentary About Higher Ed in Prison

September 18, 2019 11:53 AM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
Photo credit: Jared Ames A new PBS documentary exhibiting prison education, titled "College Behind Bars" is set to air on November 25 and 26. The four-part series documents the journeys of dozens
The federal government discharged more than $43 million in student loan debt for former students of recently closed for-profit colleges. Students who attended programs operated by Education Corporation of America, Dream Center Education Holdings, Vatterott College and Charlotte School of Law will be able to qualify for a full discharge of their federal loans if they were enrolled when their college closed or withdrew within 120 days of the official closure date and didn’t transfer to another institution, according to Inside Higher Education.

$43M in Loans Forgiven for Students of Closed Colleges

September 6, 2019 9:18 AM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
The federal government discharged more than $43 million in student loan debt for former students of recently closed for-profit colleges. Students who attended programs operated by Education
College Board is ditching its previous plan to capture socioeconomic information from students with a single score - also known as an adversity score - when scoring their SAT college admissions test. The score would have taken into account a student's socioeconomic background and the neighborhood in which they grew up.

College Board Backpedals - No Adversity Score to be Added

August 30, 2019 2:05 PM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
College Board is ditching its previous plan to capture socioeconomic information from students with a single score - also known as an "adversity score" - when scoring their SAT college admissions
Female-only college and university STEM programs are coming under fire for male discrimination as they attempt to redress gender imbalance in fields such as computer science and engineering. The U.S. Department of Education launched more than two dozen investigations into higher education institutions nationwide - including UC Berkeley, UCLA and USC as well as Yale, Princeton and Rice - which offer female-only scholarships, awards and professional development workshops.

Female-Only Scholarships Under Fire In Higher Ed

August 20, 2019 4:57 PM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
Female-only college and university STEM programs are coming under fire for male discrimination as they attempt to "redress gender imbalance" in fields such as computer science and engineering. The