Edvisors Private Student Loans

Scholarship News

Do Colleges Discriminate Against Women in Admissions?


November 3, 2009
by Scholarships.com Staff
College admission practices are often points of contention, especially when tricky issues like race, gender, and socioeconomic class are concerned. Colleges worry about trying to promote diversity and give students a fair chance in their admission practices and other parties worry about practices potentially shortchanging students. Based on some of these concerns, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights has decided to investigate allegations of gender bias in admission practices at selective colleges. The concern: in order to preserve male-to-female ratios on campus, colleges are being less selective in admitting male students than in admitting female students.

College admission practices are often points of contention, especially when tricky issues like race, gender, and socioeconomic class are concerned. Colleges worry about trying to promote diversity and give students a fair chance in their admission practices and other parties worry about practices potentially shortchanging students. Based on some of these concerns, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights has decided to investigate allegations of gender bias in admission practices at selective colleges. The concern: in order to preserve male-to-female ratios on campus, colleges are being less selective in admitting male students than in admitting female students.

In recent decades, women have begun to thrive in higher education, making up a significantly larger share of undergraduate students, bachelor's degree recipients, and master's degree students than men. Postsecondary Education Opportunity data shows that currently there are 77 men in college for every 100 women, and 73 male bachelor's degree recipients for every 100 female graduates. While gender gaps still persist within specific fields, including traditionally male-dominated disciplines like engineering and computer science, overall women are coming to college in droves and doing well once they arrive.

This trend shows no sign of reversing and has some worried that men will become increasingly underrepresented in higher education, while simultaneously work opportunities contract in traditionally male-dominated fields that don't require degrees. Schools and other organizations are beginning to address these concerns. For example, a conference panel last month addressed some of the moves being undertaken to encourage more young men to attend college and persist to a degree.

The Commission on Civil Rights inquiry is intended to see if practices are going beyond encouraging young men to enroll and have actually moved into the territory of discriminating against women in admission by admitting a smaller percentage of female applicants and being more selective in admitting women than men. This practice, while possibly unethical at private colleges, would be illegal at state colleges. So far, there hasn't been sufficient evidence to support this theory, with the majority of admission officers recently saying they don't consider gender as an important criterion in college admission, leaving some wondering if the inquiry is entirely necessary. Information subpoenaed from colleges in the Washington, D.C. area should help the commission determine whether reality reflects reporting.

Adding in another level of controversy and drawing a great deal of criticism to the investigation is the strong focus on athletics in the text of the proposal for the investigation. The theory behind it seems to be that Title IX, the federal regulation designed to prevent sex discrimination--most visibly by mandating that men's and women's sports are equally represented in public schools--is preventing men from enrolling in college by limiting their opportunities for athletic involvement. Of all the directions the investigation could take, this certainly seems to be an unusual one, and on the surface it seems to present some problematic and likely inaccurate assumptions about gender. The investigation gets underway this month, so a clearer sense of direction may emerge as time goes on.

Just because there are millions of college scholarships out there doesn’t mean you have time to go searching, and many won’t even match your profile. We’ve done the work and Scholarships.com is totally free. We have the search algorithms and scholarships database, saving you time in searching, finding and applying to thousands of dollars in college scholarships. Get instantly matched to scholarships that meet your unique talents, skillset and strengths, only those you qualify for. Access a complete list of college scholarships now by conducting a free college scholarship search at Scholarships.com.

Discuss

Share your thoughts and perhaps thousands of students will benefit from your unique insight on the subject!



If you can read this, don't touch the following fields


 
Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, the current chairman of the Senate education committee, has recently proposed the Student Loan Repayment and FAFSA Simplification Act, a piece of legislation that would allow students with no income to forgo federal student loan repayments. His recommendations, which he developed with bipartisan support, would also simplify the FAFSA and reduce the number of federal loan repayment options from nine to two.

Senator Outlines Student Loan Relief in New Proposal

July 30, 2020 11:49 AM
by Izzy Hall
Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, the current chairman of the Senate education committee, has recently proposed the Student Loan Repayment and FAFSA Simplification Act, a piece of legislation
Have your financial circumstances changed due to COVID-19? You’re not alone. Many students and their families have faced unemployment, reduced job hours and general loss of economic stability in the wake of the pandemic. And as the FAFSA determines your Expected Family Contribution (EFC) based on income from the previous year, students may have greater financial need now than they did when they initially filed for federal aid. Unfortunately, the deadline to submit the FAFSA passed at the end of June. However, it is not too late to appeal your student financial aid from your chosen institution.

It’s Not Too Late: Guide to Appealing Financial Aid

July 28, 2020 1:20 PM
by Izzy Hall
Have your financial circumstances changed due to COVID-19? You’re not alone. Many students and their families have faced unemployment, reduced job hours and general loss of economic stability in the
The FAFSA is a critical tool for both applying to colleges and applying to scholarships – in fact, need-based scholarships often require that you submit the FAFSA as part of your application. So, in a time of economic uncertainty caused by the coronavirus pandemic, it’s surprising to learn that many low-income and minority students did not submit the FAFSA for the upcoming academic year even though they would’ve been eligible for federal aid. At Scholarships.com, we don’t want students to miss out on any form of college financial aid. Applications for the next academic year will open soon, so get prepared by reviewing these FAFSA facts.

The FAFSA: Why You Should File (And How!)

July 23, 2020 3:47 PM
by Izzy Hall
The FAFSA is a critical tool for both applying to colleges and applying to scholarships – in fact, need-based scholarships often require that you submit the FAFSA as part of your application. So, in
While the CDC has not finalized their guidelines for reopening schools for the Fall 2020 semester, the New York Times discovered an unreleased document in which the organization reviews the safety protocol of a handful of institutions of higher education. How are the reviewed schools planning on confronting the coronavirus on campus this fall?

CDC Reviews Higher Ed Reopening Plans for Fall 2020

July 21, 2020 11:47 AM
by Izzy Hall
While the CDC has not finalized their guidelines for reopening schools for the Fall 2020 semester, the New York Times discovered an unreleased document in which the organization reviews the safety
A new survey detailing what rising high school seniors think about college amid the COVID-19 pandemic indicates that despite being unable to visit colleges for much of the year, rising high school seniors are already looking toward fall 2021 and are optimistic that higher education will be back to normal by that time. As a general whole, the survey findings show that the COVID-19 pandemic has not dampened prospective students' interest in attending college in fall 2021.

Where High School Seniors Stand on Coronavirus and College

July 16, 2020 9:48 AM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
A new survey detailing what rising high school seniors think about college amid the COVID-19 pandemic indicates that despite being unable to visit colleges for much of the year, "rising high school
Fraternities and sororities are important institutions that connect young men and women throughout their academic careers, forming close relationships that last into their professional lives. Fall semester is an exciting and busy time for fraternities and sororities as they welcome members back to campus and hold Rush Week events to hand-pick new members. Returning fraternity and sorority students have a big challenge for Fall 2020 — how will they adapt Greek Life and Rush Week for the coronavirus era?

Rush Week/Greek Life for Fall 2020

July 14, 2020 2:41 PM
by Izzy Hall
Fraternities and sororities are important institutions that connect young men and women throughout their academic careers, forming close relationships that last into their professional lives. Fall