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College Student Sells Positive Pregnancy Tests to Pay for College


December 20, 2016
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
College can be expensive, and while some may rely on scholarships, grants, loans or their parents to foot the bill, one Jacksonville woman got creative and sold her urine and positive pregnancy tests on Craigslist for a little extra cash.

College can be expensive, and while some may rely on scholarships, grants, loans or their parents to foot the bill, one Jacksonville woman got creative and sold her urine and positive pregnancy tests on Craigslist for a little extra cash.

Why would anyone ever purchase positive pregnancy tests or urine? The three-months pregnant woman, who chose to remain anonymous, didn't really care for what reason her buyers wanted them. In her now-removed post, she stated that it was an "absolutely no questions asked type of deal." She "didn't care at all" whether they were to be used "for your own amusement such as a prank or to blackmail the ceo [sic] of where ever who you are having an affair with." And she was strictly business, too. She promised not to overcharge for the $25 urine test but also wouldn't tolerate being "low balled either," and to not contact her if "you are going to be cheap and difficult."

WJAX/WFOX investigated this further, although "it's not illegal to sell urine." According to Action News Law and Safety expert Dale Carson, these deals are the ""kind of thing that make legislators go 'we need to pass a law that says you can't do this," since the buyers could be committing fraud. The undercover intern purchased a pregnancy test and met with the woman in a bathroom, where she produced and handed over a positive test. At this time, the woman claimed that she learned of this opportunity after "looking online for a job she could do while she was pregnant." She stated that she "saw from other women and their experiences that it's very easy" to earn up to $200 a day while "working on a bachelor's degree."

Do you support this form of funding for college education? Why or why not? Would you do it?

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Alexia S  on  1/20/2017 11:08:24 PM commented:

I do agree and think this was and is a great idea to earn money. She turned a negative into a positive(no pun intended). She was creative and out of the box. The way she made money wasn't hurting anyone directly.

Ava F.  on  12/21/2016 5:14:54 AM commented:

I do but I don't support it. I can see why it can be weird and why it can be seen as it having a possible use for fraud, but I could also see why she would sell it for college money. I mean technically she isn't doing anything wrong, she's just selling it. Its whatever the buyer decides to do with it that can be dangerous. I wouldn't do it myself because I would find it weird selling my own pee and used pregnancy test.

Green, C.  on  12/21/2016 4:19:00 AM commented:

I depending on how you look at the situation determines whether what she and others doing this are wrong or not. From a business aspect, absolutely not. She set a goal, saw an opportunity to achieve it in a manner she deemed acceptable and went for it. In the business world I honestly think that this falls along slightly similar practices, and some far more disturbing than the distribution of urine and pregnancy test.

Jessica W.  on  12/20/2016 6:21:25 PM commented:

I do not support this kind of personal funding for college. while I understand the difficulty of paying for college, especially for mothers like me, I see this as unethical and unproffessional. I once had a friend ask me when i was pregnant to give her a positive pregnancy test so she could use it as an April Fools joke. I turned her down because, not only did I not want to get involved, but I found it unnecessary. To even have a small part in a prank or sell my urine to those who would use it to cheat a system, blackmail someone or any other kind of reason someone would want urine, I would forever feel like I was part of the responsible party who needed to see the consequences of their actions. The thought that I might be responsible for ruuning someones life or helping someone lie in some way would haunt me. There is no good reason to use this kind of activity to support oneself.

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