Survey Reveals Obvious Technology Gap


November 5, 2009
by Scholarships.com Staff
Your opinions on how tech-savvy your professors are differ quite a bit from the instructors' opinions of their own technological effectiveness in the classroom, according to a survey released this week by CDW-G, an education technology provider.

Your opinions on how tech-savvy your professors are differ quite a bit from the instructors' opinions of their own technological effectiveness in the classroom, according to a survey released this week by CDW-G, an education technology provider.

According to the survey, which was collected via a nationally representative samples of students and faculty members at two- and four-year public and private colleges, students consider themselves much more technologically adept than their instructors, which may not be all that surprising:

  • About 75 percent of professors said that their school "understands how they use or want to use technology," while 32 percent of students said that their college was not preparing them well enough in the field of technology to give them useful skills for the job market.
  • About 67 percent of professors are comfortable with their own professional development in the field of technology, while only 38 percent of students said they felt their instructors were sufficiently tech-savvy.
  • About 74 percent of professors said that they incorporate technology into most classes, while only 38 percent of students agreed.

Students' perceptions of the technology gap isn't a new idea. Instructors are often viewed as being behind on the trends, even when they're actually quite technologically adept and can prove as much in the classroom. The problem comes in when the students actually are outpacing their instructors, especially in courses where technology could vastly improve a student's educational experience.

The survey, described in Inside Higher Education today, also polled IT staffers, and compared their answers with those of college professors'. In general, IT staffers expect more out of "smart" classrooms and instructors' capabilities. Both groups were asked what constitutes a smart classroom, and only about 40 percent of professors responded that an interactive whiteboard and distance learning capabilities to connect students from multiple locations constituted a smart classroom, compared to about 70 percent of IT staffers. Both groups were more on the same page when it came to general and wireless Internet access in the classroom.

The point is, technology isn't going anywhere, and it's only going to get more complex as time goes on. Professors, especially in fields where technology is going to be an important tool post-graduation, which is in most disciplines these days, should keep on top of new advances that will help make their students more effective learners.

Another article in Inside Higher Education today looks at Twitter and whether the social networking tool will become commonplace in the classroom. In that article, instructors and administrators seem wary of using Twitter in any educational way - although some are already using Twitter as the basis of their coursework - because it's seen as more of a fun diversion than a live resource or way to gather data. (Although you should obviously always fact-check anything you read on the site.) Professors may also worry that inviting Twitter into the classroom may distract students more than help them, while others argue that the site will become difficult to ignore by any institution, including colleges and universities.

What do you think about the technological capabilities at your college? Do you think your professors need a primer in new advances in technology? Let us know what you think, and whether you have ideas on how to bridge that technology gap, or whether you think it's as wide as this survey suggests.

Getting more college financial aid doesn’t have to be a relentless search. Scholarships.com is totally free. Connect with our massive database of millions of college scholarships at any time by searching for awards in a variety of ways. Scholarships.com offers the quickest and easiest way to search for, apply to, and win college scholarships. Start making your college education affordable or perhaps even free, by conducting a free college scholarship search at Scholarships.com.

Discuss

Share your thoughts and perhaps thousands of students will benefit from your unique insight on the subject!



If you can read this, don't touch the following fields


 
It's okay to be white signs were scattered on college campuses across the country, as well as in Canada over the past week. Reportedly, the signs were first suggested on an online chat forum called 4chan, calling on people to place posters in their area on Halloween night. At Harvard Law School, at least 20 handmade stickers with the message It's ok to be white were posted on light poles and electrical boxes. Harvard Law's Dean of Students Marcia Sells condemned the posters, stating the posters and stickers are intended to divide us from one another and that HLS will not let that happen here. The Department of Public Works removed the stickers shortly thereafter. Even after they had been removed, the message continued to circulate via social media through hashtags and videos, gaining both condemnation and support.

"OK to Be White" Signs a "Sign of the Times"?

November 7, 2017 11:47 AM
by Susan Dutca
"It's okay to be white" signs were scattered on college campuses across the country, as well as in Canada over the past week. Reportedly, the signs were first suggested on an online chat forum called
Halloween Day hadn't even officially arrived and college students (and even faculty) sparked outrage over their offensive and racially derogatory costumes. One of the images that went viral over the weekend was that of a police officer from the University of Nevada at Reno, who was dressed as former Quarterback Colin Kaepernick - allegedly in blackface and wearing a sign that read Will Stand for Food.

Colleges Investigating Offensive Halloween Costumes

October 31, 2017 11:09 AM
by Susan Dutca
Halloween Day hadn't even officially arrived and college students (and even faculty) sparked outrage over their offensive and "racially derogatory" costumes. One of the images that went viral over
First-time community college students in California may be able to get a discounted, or even free college education thanks to a new California College Promise law. The point of the program is to create the environment and alignment that will help students finish college.

Community College Comp'd in California?

October 17, 2017 9:12 AM
by Susan Dutca
First-time community college students in California may be able to get a discounted, or even free college education thanks to a new "California College Promise" law. The point of the program is to

    Students and families who use Scholarships.com as their one-stop shop for free college and financial aid information and opportunities is the reason why we are thankful. As a way of saying thanks, we’ve come up with a way for you the squash student loan debt with these November Scholarships. For even more scholarships in November, click here.

Gobble Up these November Scholarships

October 6, 2017 12:02 PM
by Susan Dutca
Students and families who use Scholarships.com as their one-stop shop for free college and financial aid information and opportunities is the reason why we are thankful. As a way of saying
Warren Wilson College, a school known for attracting liberal students, is seeking to recruit conservative students in effort to broaden [their] appeal to those with all kinds of worldviews. Other college and university leaders claim that the 2016 election serves as inspiration for this initiative and they are also fearful that their institutions are disconnected from conservatives who make up a majority in much of the country.

Liberal School Seeking to Recruit Conservative Students

October 3, 2017 11:17 AM
by Susan Dutca
Warren Wilson College, a school known for attracting liberal students, is seeking to recruit conservative students in effort to "broaden [their] appeal to those with all kinds of worldviews." Other
Parents of boys are more likely to pay the entire cost of college than those who have girls, according to a 
new study from T. Rowe Price. They are also more willing to prioritize saving for their sons' college over their own retirement.

Parents Save More for Sons’ College Education

September 26, 2017 9:39 AM
by Susan Dutca
Parents of boys are more likely to pay the entire cost of college than those who have girls, according to a new study from T. Rowe Price. They are also more willing to prioritize saving for their