College Avenue Student Loans Edvisors Private Student Loans

Scholarship News

The Digital Textbook Divide


April 15, 2013
by Mike Sheffey

Online and digital textbooks are a growing resource for college students. They can be cheap, interactive, fun and sometimes more useful than their traditional predecessors. And now there is a surge of technology for professors to use as well, including ways to digitally check if their students are reading the assigned material.

Online and digital textbooks are a growing resource for college students. They can be cheap, interactive, fun and sometimes more useful than their traditional predecessors. And now there is a surge of technology for professors to use as well, including ways to digitally check if their students are reading the assigned material.

I personally have only used digital textbooks as accompaniments to hardcover books but the concept of an entirely digital book is enticing. Only having to carry around a tablet or laptop is a great thing for students burdened by long walks across campus with clunky book bags. But when I’m assigned a reading, I assume that the teacher trusts that I’ll do it – not that I necessarily have to but because it will benefit me in the long run. I think that checking via software forces students to do something that a good student would already do. And I think that most college students aren't attending college to NOT do their assignments; it’s not a cheap investment to just sit around!

Honor codes at most colleges deal with assignments, cheating, etc. The idea is great but its execution comes across a bit untrusting from professors. It may also not be the best way to keep tabs on student learning. For some, this kind of checking could benefit them but students have their own unique study methods and could do poorly on the online checks but still ace tests. Programs like CourseSmart (one of the online data collecting programs) could be useful to chart progress overall but to place grades or too much merit in the technology conveys a message to students that professors don’t trust their commitment to coursework. People learn different ways and should be given the opportunity to study, read and work the way that is best for them.

Overall, the idea of digital textbooks is a great one if used properly: as an additional resource and not a primary way of determining student learning. Other resources, quizzes and methods should be used as well to provide a balance in various learning styles. What has your experience with digital textbooks been?

Mike Sheffey is a junior at Wofford College double majoring in computer science and Spanish. He loves all things music and has recently taken up photography. Mike works for an on-campus sports broadcasting company as well as the music news blog PropertyOfZack.com. He hopes to use this blogging position to inform and assist others who are seeking the right college or those currently enrolled in college by providing advice on college life, both in general and specific to Wofford.

College is expensive, Scholarships.com is completely free. Pay for your college education with as much free college scholarship money as possible. By applying to all the awards you qualify for, you can be sure to not miss a single opportunity in paying for your college expenses - including tuition, fees, room and board. Get matched to college scholarships instantly and start applying today by conducting a free college scholarship search at Scholarships.com.

Discuss

Share your thoughts and perhaps thousands of students will benefit from your unique insight on the subject!



If you can read this, don't touch the following fields


 
Fraternities and sororities are important institutions that connect young men and women throughout their academic careers, forming close relationships that last into their professional lives. Fall semester is an exciting and busy time for fraternities and sororities as they welcome members back to campus and hold Rush Week events to hand-pick new members. Returning fraternity and sorority students have a big challenge for Fall 2020 — how will they adapt Greek Life and Rush Week for the coronavirus era?

Rush Week/Greek Life for Fall 2020

July 14, 2020 2:41 PM
by Izzy Hall
Fraternities and sororities are important institutions that connect young men and women throughout their academic careers, forming close relationships that last into their professional lives. Fall
The college dining hall – a place for food, friends and well-earned breaks. It’s known for a wide array of food bars, buffets, made-to-order stations and generous ice cream offerings. But for the Fall 2020 semester, the dining experience will undergo a reinvention to serve food safely amidst the novel coronavirus. What will the dining halls of the COVID-19 era look like?

New Menus for College Dining in Fall 2020

June 30, 2020 10:56 AM
by Izzy Hall
The college dining hall – a place for food, friends and well-earned breaks. It’s known for a wide array of food bars, buffets, made-to-order stations and generous ice cream offerings. But for the
If you're worried about how you will pay for college during the COVID-19 pandemic, you're not alone. Students and families are concerned about the college financial ramifications as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, and higher education institutions are anticipating an increase in students' financial aid need, as well as a large number of college financial aid appeals. Fortunately, there are ample options and resources to help you pay for college these coming semesters. Explore the various options to find out which works best for your situation - from scholarship deadline extensions to relief provided through the CARES Act and more.

Paying for College during Coronavirus

June 26, 2020 3:48 PM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
If you're worried about how you will pay for college during the COVID-19 pandemic, you're not alone. Students and families are concerned about the college financial ramifications as a result of the
On June 1st, Kansas State began bringing back student athletes to start football pre-season training with voluntary workouts. By June 20th, with 13 students testing positive for coronavirus, they shut their workout program down. What happened to the Kansas State athletes wasn’t unique – as schools, hoping to bring back the moneymaker that is college football, are discovering. And it provides an early look at what schools could be facing if they plan to re-open their campuses come the fall.

College Football Pre-Season Gets off on Wrong Foot

June 25, 2020 3:14 PM
by Izzy Hall
On June 1st, Kansas State began bringing back student athletes to start football pre-season training with voluntary workouts. By June 20th, with 13 students testing positive for coronavirus, they