University Prez Charged with Offering Enrollment for Money and Sex


January 19, 2016
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
After being charged with sexual bribery, trafficking degrees, and misappropriating public funds, a former president of the University of Toulon began trial on Monday and, if found guilty, could face up to 10 years in prison and €150,000 in fines for enrolling Chinese students in exchange for monetary and sexual favors.

After being charged with sexual bribery, trafficking degrees, and misappropriating public funds, a former president of the University of Toulon began trial on Monday and, if found guilty, could face up to 10 years in prison and €150,000 in fines for enrolling Chinese students in exchange for monetary and sexual favors.

Laroussi Oueslati, former French president of the University of Toulon served as the central admission official back in 2008 and focused primarily on developing and strengthening the workforce through the recruitment of Asian and South American students. In 2008 alone, 300 students - primarily of Chinese descent - were admitted to the university. However, due to their "low-level of French," they never should have been admitted. Oueslati reportedly shortened the registration and admissions process by accepting students who "paid him up to €3,000 (£2,300) each." Some students claimed they were assured a seat in exchange for "having intimate relation" with Oueslati. Sexual bribery, in this case, refers to the solicitation of sexual favors by promise or rewards, which is viewed as a serious form of professional and moral corruption. So far, 14 witnesses have been called to appear in this week's trial.

Several students took to the Internet to openly state that Oueslati requested €3,000 to be paid directly to him to secure university admission. In addition to bypassing the traditional admissions process, he reportedly created his own panel, "independent of the university's central admission process," which "rarely examined candidates' academic records," according to The Telegraph. In response to all of the claims, Oueslati maintains his innocence, stating, "I am not corrupt...I can tell you that if ever someone tried to corrupt me I would, if you'll excuse the expression, tell them to p-- off." One other university administrator and four former Chinese students also face charges. Two students who fled to China are also being sought out for arrest.

Oueslati had an "all-powerful academic" and irresistible personality and presence at the Institut d'Administration des Entreprises, according to Le Monde. Nonetheless, once the accusations came to light in 2009, he was forced to resign and potentially faces a lifetime ban from exercising any role in the world of academia, if not greater consequences. The trial, which began on Monday, is expected to continue until Friday.

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Discuss

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Jacob jm  on  1/25/2016 2:32:52 PM commented:

I feel that I don't see any problem with Chinese wanting to go to western countries because they have a right to do and go were ever they want.

Mussawir zaman  on  1/21/2016 10:30:44 AM commented:

I studied engineering and I have no amount to contain our then I saw a scholarship in the internet and I thought that this is the chance for me

Brittany sephers  on  1/21/2016 12:05:02 AM commented:

I don't see any problem with Chinese wanting to go to western countries because they have a right to do and go were ever they want.

Kelsey R  on  1/20/2016 10:19:54 PM commented:

I myself want to go into the profession of teaching. I have the most respect for teachers and professors because they do the work that will shape our futures but get paid garbage. This man, what he did is horrible. While he may denie it and some may comment that he did it to help these young people to get into school it does matter what his intentions were. He took advantage of these people who where trying to pursue an education. As well as put them in a place where the language barrier would harm their academics. He should be fired. And as for the students, I don't know. They were in the wrong and they knew what they where doing was inappropriate but I don't know how they should be handled. It's a shame that an education is so difficult to obtain that people feel as if they need to resort to these acts.

Bre m.  on  1/20/2016 3:23:29 PM commented:

I think the fact that a college president would do such a thing is appalling. No man should ever buy a woman to receive sexual favors. These women were seeking higher education and instead were ripped off by these slime balls. They obviously shouldn't have agreed to it, but if they felt that they had no other choice, what other options did they have?

Abigail M  on  1/20/2016 2:01:30 PM commented:

This is crazy that this is what students did to get into this school, and that this guy thought to do this to people who just wanted to go to school. I am thoroughly disgusted by what this guy has done to these innocent people just trying to go to college.

Coco R.  on  1/20/2016 1:54:05 AM commented:

Wow! What a terrible thing to happen. An absolute abuse of power. I am appalled at the years it took to get him to court! The accusations came to light in 2009 but the trial just began on Monday? Better late than never, I guess. As long as he suffers for his disgustingly inappropriate actions. I would have never seen this without this blog post so thank you for sharing!

DTUB  on  1/19/2016 9:15:01 PM commented:

Hahahahahaha, well thanks for sharing. Did these students believe this was their only option/chance for education? If so, this is a shame they had to go through this, hope they can move forward :D

Erika M.C  on  1/19/2016 8:08:52 PM commented:

Same hear i agree with darrin m

Joey P  on  1/19/2016 5:12:16 PM commented:

I see nothing wrong with this. If the Chinese want to be in western countries, they will need to offer us something in exchange. Let us be honest here, there is no better feeling than having sex with a gorgeous Chinese girl. I had it before and I think this is a genius move by the president. Sigh, stupid political correctness strikes again.

Charisse Stribling  on  1/19/2016 4:14:53 PM commented:

Solicitation seems to be famous and a reality that is omitted beyond a reasonable doubt. Professional tyranny is praised and there are no remorseful voices. Education is an experience that should privilege students to be academically informed without hassle of solicitations that are forms of misconduct by their superiors.

Darrin M  on  1/19/2016 2:06:17 PM commented:

I'm confused...I thought news and notifications at this site/app would be related to finding scholarships as opposed to stories available at traditional news outlets.

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