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You and Your College Fund

Are you in the process of deciding where to go to school? The cost of tuition is often the factor that determines where a student will go to school. The difference in tuition typically depends on what type of school you choose to attend. If your major is offered by most schools, keep an open mind when considering your options. The bottom line: don't rule out a cheaper option because it is so. Cheaper can mean "worse", but is doesn't have to.

  • Community Colleges

    The most fiscally conservative approach to attending school is by a long shot, the community college route. Most only offer 2-year degrees; however, they are a great place to complete your general education requirements. In my own experience, I have found that general 100-level courses are just about the same regardless of where you attend. If finances are a major concern, consider the community college option.
  • State Universities

    A state university may not be your first choice, but they offer students an opportunity to obtain a prorated first-class education, and a diploma upon completion. State schools are typically less expensive than a private college, but it is significantly harder to receive a scholarship for a state school as most of the scholarships available only apply to students with financial need.
  • Private Colleges

    Private institutions almost always cost more, but for students who excel in academics or athletics they offer impressive scholarship incentives. Half or full tuition scholarships are not unusual; students who attend these universities typically receive an offer that they simply cannot refuse.

Discuss payment options with your parents

It's decided. You are going to college, come heck or high water. But who's paying for it? Many students assume that their parents are willing to foot the bill for their tuition and are shocked and appalled when they find out that their sneaky folks have plans of their own. Plans, that—gasp—don't include paying for your education. If this is the case, it is better to know sooner that later so that you can investigate your financial aid options.

Estimate how much you can contribute on your own

Did you know that in just one summer, most students can make enough money to pay the tuition for one semester at a community college

Search for Scholarships

This is one option that I wish I had taken advantage of when I was attending school. There are billions of dollars at your finger tips. Take advantage of the generosity that various organizations advance in the form of scholarship rewards. A dedicated scholarship searcher can potentially earn thousands of dollars.

Apply for aid

Regardless of who is paying for college, submit your Free Application For Student Aid (FAFSA) Form. Your individual financial circumstance will be evaluated and it will determine how much Federal Student Aid you qualify for. If you receive a financial aid package, it will typically be composed of various grants and loans.

Comparing your options

Before registering at a school, wait until you have several offers on the table that you can compare. If you applied to a state, community, and private college, make a list of the advantages and disadvantages of each. Consider these factors when assessing the financial assistance that each will offer you.

Latest College & Financial Aid News

Amazon Offers $40K Future Engineer Scholarships

November 6, 2019

by Susan Dutca-Lovell

E-tail giant Amazon is now accepting applications to its Amazon Future Engineer Scholarship Program for students entering college in the fall of 2020. The scholarship program offers 100 current high school seniors from underserved and underrepresented communities across the country the opportunity to receive $40,000 scholarships to study computer science at a four-year college or university and a guaranteed paid internship offer at Amazon after the completion of their first year. [...]

NC Senator Proposes Taxing of Athletic Scholarships

October 31, 2019

by Susan Dutca-Lovell

In response to the NCAA's vote to allow athletes to profit from their names, images and likeness, Senator Richard Burr of North Carolina has proposed taxing those scholarships. Senator Burr tweeted: "If college athletes are going to make money off their likenesses while in school, their scholarships should be treated like income. I'll be introducing legislation that subjects scholarships given to athletes who choose to 'cash in' to income taxes." [...]

Gucci Gaffe Results in Green for Grads

October 8, 2019

by Susan Dutca-Lovell

Gucci is releasing a new line of... diversity undergraduate scholarships for students who are "traditionally underrepresented in the fashion industry." The 1.5 million U.S. university college scholarship program is set to run for four years, targeting students who attend four-year universities. Special consideration will be given to those residing in Atlanta, Chicago, Detroit, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New Orleans, New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Toronto and Washington, D.C and/or for those who plan to attend or are currently attending a Historically Black College and University (HBCU). [...]