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Finding An Apartment Roommate

Many college students choose off-campus apartments instead of dormitories or other on-campus housing options. Apartments often cost more than on-campus housing options and it is common for students who want to live in off-campus housing to get a roommate with whom they can share expenses. If you are planning to move off-campus and you need someone to share the expenses, it is a good idea to find an apartment roommate before you sign a lease. If you can’t afford the apartment on your own, you could find yourself stuck in a situation that could have been avoided by finding a roommate in time.

To find an apartment roommate, talk to people in your circle of friends and acquaintances to see if any of them are interested in giving up dormitory living. It is very likely that someone you know would love to move to an apartment, provided it isn't going to cost them more than living in the dorm. If not, ask for referrals of others who might be interested. You can also post notices on bulletin boards around campus and/or run a “roommate wanted” advertisement in your campus newspaper.

Once you have identified one or more potential roommates, spend enough time together to figure out if you are likely to be compatible roommates. Ask important roommate questions related to sleep schedules, noise preferences, tidiness habits, allergies and pets to make sure that your habits don't conflict. If you agree that rooming together is a good idea, start looking for an apartment that meets your needs in terms of space, location and cost.

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