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Junior Year Timeline

Opt for A.P.

Most high schools offer Advanced Placement courses for juniors and seniors. If you can handle the challenge, talk to your guidance counselor about enrolling in a few classes. AP courses look great on your transcripts, and will count for college credit if you score well enough on the exam. This will save money because you are taking care of general education requirements before starting college. You will also know what to expect academically when you get to college. If you are nervous about AP classes, start with one or two before adding more to your class schedule.

  • Scholarships, Scholarships, Scholarships

    Start your scholarship search early. Many universities offer scholarships for incoming freshman. Most scholarships are merit-based, but there are others available for race, religion, and students with unique circumstances or special talents. Essay and sweepstakes scholarships often allow students to apply during their junior year, so make these your first priority.
  • Visit Out-of-State Universities

    Look at the out-of-state universities on your list. When comparing schools, factor in the price difference. Out-of-state schools are always more expensive, so have a budget in mind. Know how much you will need from a financial aid package to make an out-of-state school affordable. Also, look into housing options. If you plan to live off campus, check the surrounding area for neighborhoods that are safe and affordable.
  • Compare and Contrast

    Start narrowing down your college choices, and focus on your top few. Take note of what characteristics these schools share to confirm the qualities you are looking for. Consider their differences, and how those differences would impact you if you attended that school.
  • Take the SAT/ACT

    Take the SAT/ACT as early as possible so you can retake the test to get the best score possible. Check score requirements for each of your top schools. Look at what test each school prefers. Most schools accept scores from both exams, but some universities request a specific exam.
  • Letters of Recommendation

    Make a list of teachers you plan to ask for a letter of recommendation. Ask early, because teachers will be writing letters for every college bound student in your graduating class. Have at least 3-4 letters in hand by the end of your junior year.

Latest College & Financial Aid News

University Student with Down Syndrome Rejected by Sororities

September 25, 2018

by Susan Dutca

An accomplished student and athlete at George Mason University was not accepted to any sororities at the university. Her sister Lillie believes this is because she has Down syndrome. "Accepting a woman with a disability to a chapter isn't an act of charity, it brings diversity and promotes inclusion," Lillie Heigl wrote in her letter to the head of the university's Greek life. [...]

Middle Class Students Now Qualify for Full Scholarships at Rice University

September 18, 2018

by Susan Dutca

Photo courtesy of Rice University

Some middle-class families may qualify for free tuition scholarships or grants to attend Rice University under a brand-new financial aid plan. The new initiative, called The Rice Investment, will provide full-tuition scholarships to families with incomes up to $130,000 and tuition cuts for families with incomes up to $200,000. [...]

Colleges Drop Nike over Controversial Kaepernick Ad

September 11, 2018

by Susan Dutca

Nike gear will not be worn by athletes at The College of the Ozarks following the company's latest ads featuring Colin Kaepernick, claiming it would "choose its country over company." According to the college president, "in their new ad campaign, we believe Nike executives are promoting an attitude of division and disrespect toward America." [...]

Last Reviewed: September 2018