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Junior Year Timeline

Opt for A.P.

Most high schools offer Advanced Placement courses for juniors and seniors. If you can handle the challenge, talk to your guidance counselor about enrolling in a few classes. AP courses look great on your transcripts, and will count for college credit if you score well enough on the exam. This will save money because you are taking care of general education requirements before starting college. You will also know what to expect academically when you get to college. If you are nervous about AP classes, start with one or two before adding more to your class schedule.

  • Scholarships, Scholarships, Scholarships

    Start your scholarship search early. Many universities offer scholarships for incoming freshman. Most scholarships are merit-based, but there are others available for race, religion, and students with unique circumstances or special talents. Essay and sweepstakes scholarships often allow students to apply during their junior year, so make these your first priority.
  • Visit Out-of-State Universities

    Look at the out-of-state universities on your list. When comparing schools, factor in the price difference. Out-of-state schools are always more expensive, so have a budget in mind. Know how much you will need from a financial aid package to make an out-of-state school affordable. Also, look into housing options. If you plan to live off campus, check the surrounding area for neighborhoods that are safe and affordable.
  • Compare and Contrast

    Start narrowing down your college choices, and focus on your top few. Take note of what characteristics these schools share to confirm the qualities you are looking for. Consider their differences, and how those differences would impact you if you attended that school.
  • Take the SAT/ACT

    Take the SAT/ACT as early as possible so you can retake the test to get the best score possible. Check score requirements for each of your top schools. Look at what test each school prefers. Most schools accept scores from both exams, but some universities request a specific exam.
  • Letters of Recommendation

    Make a list of teachers you plan to ask for a letter of recommendation. Ask early, because teachers will be writing letters for every college bound student in your graduating class. Have at least 3-4 letters in hand by the end of your junior year.

Latest College & Financial Aid News

End of the Year 2017 Scholarships

December 13, 2017

by Susan Dutca

'Oh what fun it is to win scholarships to help pay for college! We've curated a selection of the best scholarships to apply for before the year is over. (Considering the 3.7 million scholarships we have, it was no easy task). Check out this list of 2017 scholarships and get a jump start on your financial aid package for next year by winning scholarships for college. : [...]

"It's OK to Be White" Protestor Turns Herself In

December 12, 2017

by Susan Dutca

Photo by Rebecca Lurye/Hartford Courant

Midway through his "It's OK to be White" speech at the University of Connecticut, Conservative commentator Lucian Wintrich was arrested and charged with attempted larceny and disorderly conduct after he grabbed a woman who had swiped his notes off his lectern. The charges have since been dropped and in a reversal, the woman was arrested and charged with attempted larceny and disorderly conduct.

[...]

Stanford Caught Lying by Grad Student/Former Google Intern

December 5, 2017

by Susan Dutca

Stanford Business School officials have admitted to giving steep price breaks to preferred applicants while on their website, for years, claimed that "all fellowships are need based." The news came after one student discovered a glitch on their website that gave public access to confidential student financial aid records. [...]

Last Reviewed: December 2017