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Junior Year Timeline

Opt for A.P.

Most high schools offer Advanced Placement courses for juniors and seniors. If you can handle the challenge, talk to your guidance counselor about enrolling in a few classes. AP courses look great on your transcripts, and will count for college credit if you score well enough on the exam. This will save money because you are taking care of general education requirements before starting college. You will also know what to expect academically when you get to college. If you are nervous about AP classes, start with one or two before adding more to your class schedule.

  • Scholarships, Scholarships, Scholarships

    Start your scholarship search early. Many universities offer scholarships for incoming freshman. Most scholarships are merit-based, but there are others available for race, religion, and students with unique circumstances or special talents. Essay and sweepstakes scholarships often allow students to apply during their junior year, so make these your first priority.
  • Visit Out-of-State Universities

    Look at the out-of-state universities on your list. When comparing schools, factor in the price difference. Out-of-state schools are always more expensive, so have a budget in mind. Know how much you will need from a financial aid package to make an out-of-state school affordable. Also, look into housing options. If you plan to live off campus, check the surrounding area for neighborhoods that are safe and affordable.
  • Compare and Contrast

    Start narrowing down your college choices, and focus on your top few. Take note of what characteristics these schools share to confirm the qualities you are looking for. Consider their differences, and how those differences would impact you if you attended that school.
  • Take the SAT/ACT

    Take the SAT/ACT as early as possible so you can retake the test to get the best score possible. Check score requirements for each of your top schools. Look at what test each school prefers. Most schools accept scores from both exams, but some universities request a specific exam.
  • Letters of Recommendation

    Make a list of teachers you plan to ask for a letter of recommendation. Ask early, because teachers will be writing letters for every college bound student in your graduating class. Have at least 3-4 letters in hand by the end of your junior year.

Latest College & Financial Aid News

Wealthy Parents Bribe Elite Colleges to Admit Their Children

March 12, 2019

by Scholarships.com Staff

Literally dozens of people have been charged in an admissions bribery scheme involving elite colleges and wealthy parents who wanted to get their progeny enrolled by any means necessary, including bribes ranging from $200K to $6.5M. [...]

Morehouse Prof Offers Childcare to Overwhelmed Student Parent

March 5, 2019

by Susan Dutca

A Morehouse College student who was not able to find childcare was told by his mathematics professor to bring his baby to class. Upon being taken up on his offer, the professor proceeded to teach the class with the infant strapped to his chest so the student to take adequate notes. [...]

Should This Factor Be Considered in College Admissions Decisions?

February 27, 2019

by Susan Dutca

Almost three-fourths of people surveyed by the Pew Research Center are against consideration of race when it comes to college admissions decisions. Only 7 percent believe it should be a major factor and 19 percent say it should be a minor factor. These views were reportedly shared by "solid majorities of white, black, Latino and Asian Americans."

In 2016, after the Supreme Court affirmed the right of colleges to consider race in admissions, a Gallup poll indicated that approximately two-thirds of the public disagreed with the Supreme Court. Only 9 percent believed that race should be a major factor in admissions decisions, and 27 percent said it should be considered a minor factor. The survey did not end there. [...]

Last Reviewed: March 2019