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What to Expect When You Get to College

College can be intimidating for high school seniors. The rigorous elimination process that many aspiring students endure after applying to colleges often leaves them feeling inadequate and unqualified even after they are accepted into a university. Don’t despair - your college career will be manageable if you make the effort! Students who arrive equipped with an abundance of potential and an eagerness to succeed find that they are more than prepared to handle the challenges that await them at college.

  • Climate

    The climate on a college campus is one of the major distinguishing differences between high school and college. Students typically find that the atmosphere is incredibly independent; students are expected, not asked, to keep up with their classes and complete assignments. The characteristics of the student body vary from campus to campus, but most are far more studious than any high school. Another difference is that interaction with peers is much easier in college than in high school. While you will find peer groups with common interests, you’re much less likely to come across the tight knit cliques of students that are so common in high school.
  • Class structure

    Group projects are out and class discussions are in—in college. Some classes will use them, but no where near as much as they were used in high school. The larger the class, the less interactive it tends to be. Small classes typically revolve around some combination of lecturing and group discussions, whereas large classes typically rely solely on lecture.
  • Work load

    You probably guessed this: the workload in college is significantly heavier than in high school. Expect a large amount of reading and a fair amount of writing, depending on your major. Clearly students working towards a bachelors of science write significantly less than students pursuing, let’s say, English for example. This may vary from the rule, but in my own experience, I found that for every one hour in a class I had to devote about 2 hours outside of the course to keep up with readings and other assignments.
  • Professor Student Relationships

    Professors and college students have a unique relationship. Unlike high school teachers, a professor enters a classroom filled with students who for the most part, all want to be there. They’ve paid their tuition and have a goal in mind and for such students college is likely the only thing that makes their goal possible. Very rarely do close friendships emerge from high school student-teacher relationships, but for college students and their professors, this is quite common. Professors won’t nag you about your homework, but they will make an effort to help you with course material that you might be struggling with.

The advisor for each of the high school clubs in which you hold a membership may be able to help you identify scholarship opportunities based on your extracurricular activities. A scholarship search that matches students with scholarship programs based on their activities can be an excellent resource for locating hard-to-find scholarships based on extracurricular activity participation.

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Yale to Ditch "Freshman", "Upperclassmen", Adopt Gender-Neutral Terms

September 19, 2017

by Susan Dutca

In an effort to modernize, Yale will no longer use the terms "freshman" and "underclassmen" and will instead adopt gender-neutral terminology, such as "first-year" and "upper-level students." University officials still anticipate students and faculty to use the old terminology, since they're "deeply ingrained in our everyday language and in Yale's history."

The new terminology can be found in the Undergraduate Regulations and the First-Year Handbook and is expected to appear in all Yale College's publications and communications by the start of the 2018-2019 academic year. The effort to phase out the older terminology is "a piece of a larger movement to reflect the diversity of college campuses" and also in part because the "two words in particular are gendered," according to Jennifer Keup, Director Of the National Resource for the First-Year-Experience and students in Transition. [...]

Senate Bill to Make College Affordable and Accessible for Homeless, Foster Care Youth

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by Susan Dutca

A bipartisan group of U.S House of Representatives and U.S. Senate lawmakers recently introduced a bill that would help homeless students and foster youth get the financial support they need for college. The bill would also remove other barriers to higher education, such as providing housing options, improving outreach, and streamlining the FAFSA to homeless and foster care students. [...]

Harvest Fall Scholarships for College

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Enjoy a seasonal treat this season with fall scholarships from Scholarships.com to help pay your college tuition bill. Harvest some of the largest dollar scholarships, most prestigious scholarships, and brand name scholarships out there with our list of October scholarships. These autumn scholarships are so good you'll scream! So hurry and apply for these scholarships due in October and don't let them fall by the wayside. For a complete list of scholarships due in October, click here. [...]