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Why Go To College?

Personal growth and expanded horizons

If you go to college, you'll gain information and skills that you'll use for the rest of your life. That's reason enough to pursue an education beyond high school, but here are more practical considerations.

Some benefits of extracurricular activities

  • Have more job opportunities

    The world is changing rapidly. More and more jobs require education beyond high school. College graduates have more jobs to choose from.
  • Earn more money

    A person who goes to college usually earns more than a person who doesn't. On average, over a lifetime, someone who spends two years in college earns $250,000 more than someone who doesn't. That's a quarter of a million dollars more over a lifetime.
  • Expand your knowledge base

    A college education helps you acquire a range of knowledge in many subjects, as well as advanced knowledge in the specific subjects you're most interested in. It also increases your ability to think abstractly and critically, to express thoughts clearly in speech and in writing, and to make wise decisions. These skills are useful both on and off the job.
  • Increase your potential

    A college education can help increase your understanding of the community and the world as you explore interests, discover new areas of knowledge, and consider lifelong goals.

Getting a college education is an investment that will pay back for a lifetime. People with a college education have better job opportunities, earn more money, and develop skills that can never be taken away.

It Doesn't Have To Be A Four-Year College

Consider attending a community college. Community colleges are public, two-year schools that provide an excellent education, whether you're considering an associate degree, a certificate program, technical training, or plan to continue your studies at a four-year college. Learn more.

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