Moving In

So the family vehicle is practically bursting at the hinges with the college essentials we listed earlier (if flying, we apologize for the exorbitant checked baggage fees in advance) and you and your child are finally on the way to campus. The day will be a long one for many reasons but, if you know what they are, there are ways to keep the process moving along at a decent clip.

Once the actual move is complete, however, parents – especially ones sending their first child away to school – are often confused about how long they should stay with their child afterward and if they’re going to be able to keep it together when it’s time to say goodbye. It’s not going to be easy but, as always, we’ve got your back when you need it most.

Moving Tips and Tricks

You are a human being, not a pack mule, so the idea of carrying 12 boxes in your arms per trip just isn’t realistic – it’s dangerous. Everything packed has to make it from the car to the dorm, though, so here are a few things that will expedite the moving process, keep things organized and prevent you from throwing your back out.

They’re Moved In…Now What?

The last of the boxes is finally unpacked and your child and their roommate are getting acquainted. Where does that leave you as a parent? In a strange place, honestly. Do you stay or go? It’s a good idea to discuss this gray area with your child before getting to campus; introverts may prefer their parents to stick around for a while as they get more comfortable with their surroundings while extroverts will probably be eager to say goodbye and explore their new home. Like on campus visits, some schools have parent-centric seminars or events that both students and parents can go to but attendance is usually not mandatory.

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