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LSAT

Law School Admission Test

The LSAT is a standardized test designed to measure your reading and verbal reasoning skills. Submission of test scores is required by all American Bar Association (ABA)-approved schools. It is composed of six sections and graded on a scale of 120-180. Below you will find a typical test layout. With the exception of the writing sample, these sections may be found in any order.

  • The Logical

    There will be two logical sections on the test, and you will have 35 minutes to complete each of them. Each of these sections will be made up of either 25 or 26 questions. Many of them will present short arguments and ask that you draw conclusions based on what you have read.
  • The Analytical

    You will have 35 minutes to finish the 23 or 24 questions that make up this portion of the test. You will be presented with 4 logic puzzles and asked to answer the 5-8 questions that follow. Many students find this to be the most difficult portion of the test, but it is also the easiest to improve on.
  • Reading Comprehension

    This section also lasts 35 minutes and is composed of 28 questions. The reading comprehension section tests your ability to read carefully and draw references from the provided texts. You will be given 400-500 word excerpts and asked to answer questions based on what you have read
  • The Trial

    Each exam will include a trial section that will not count towards your final score. This section may be found in a logical, analytical, or reading comprehension format, and it may be placed anywhere. There is no way to tell which section is the testing section so you should do your best on the entire test.
  • The Writing Sample

    The writing sample is always found at the end of the test. You will have 35 minutes to write an essay on the topic provided. Although the writing sample is not graded, schools will receive a copy of it. Law schools pay attention to the clarity, writing mechanics, and word usage when evaluating your work.

Many schools place significant stress on LSAT scores. As frustrating as this may be, application committees frequently consider the LSAT to be the best indicator of school success. You don’t need to tie yourself into a knot over this, but you should definitely prepare. There are test centers that offer prep classes, and there are enough prep books to keep you busy for months. To get you started, we have prepared some sample LSAT problems in the following sections:

Sample Questions

To print a PDF version of the LSAT overview and practice test questions, click here.

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