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Tips for Overcoming Procrastination in Online Learning

For many, the primary advantage in getting an online degree is the flexibility to take classes any time from any location that has available Internet access. Although many people believe it is an easy way to earn a degree, flexibility in schedule doesn’t mean less effort or work.

Create a Class Schedule

Although you can choose when to complete your distance learning courses, it is in your best interest to create your own class schedule and be loyal to it. Perhaps you only have time to study on your lunch breaks- do it. Incorporate study time into the schedule and treat it as an important appointment.

Prevent your own Failures

Success in distance learning programs requires effort, discipline, and self-motivation. If you do not complete coursework at your set times, it can be easy to make excuses and miss important deadlines. Procrastination can become an issue, which in turn leads to failure. Penciling in your optimal study hours will keep you on track with assignments and studying and ensures greater success.

Do not waste your opportunity

You may have qualified for a Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant, but do not let that allow you to procrastinate just because you know you will not be marked absent for a class. Keep disciplined just as you would be were you enrolled at an on-campus course. The expectations and standards in online degree programs are no less rigorous or lenient than traditional colleges, so treat it as such. Do not let the flexible nature of online courses keep you from achieving your academic goals.

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Last Reviewed: September 2017