Blog

by Emily Rabinowitz

Summer is in full swing and for most high school students, that means it's time for college tours! Throughout my four years of high school, I visited and toured nearly 20 different universities to find what worked for me. In an effort to ease your college touring adventures, here's what helped me:

  • Plan ahead. During the summer and school breaks, college tours fill up quickly. Remember to book your tour, hotel and other details in advance. Try not to plan too many visits on the same day, as tours can be a lot of walking.
  • Get in touch with Great Aunt Millie. Whether they're across the country or in a neighboring state, chances are you know someone who can serve as an "excuse" to visit that school you've been dreaming of. If you don't have family near one of your schools, consider finding a fun family attraction nearby; after long days of college tours, everyone needs a little fun! (Pro tip: Cedar Point Amusement Park in Ohio is awesome if you're taking a road trip to visit Midwest schools!)
  • Communication is key. Even though it may seem like it, your parents can't read your mind so tell them what is important to you in a school. In my experience, parents can use a reminder that college applications are hard and time consuming; the tour process is mainly to help you decide which schools you will apply to.
  • Stay positive. Remember that college is a buyer's market: When looking at schools, you have the deciding power. The more you can see yourself at a school, the better your application will be. Trust me, the readers will see this as they review your materials.
  • Be honest with yourself. If you're like me, you started off with over 20 potential schools. At some point, you'll need to cross some off the list. Listen to your gut and trust that you will end up somewhere great!
  • Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (2)

    by Ashley Grego

    When most people hear Penn State, they think of the college town located in State College famous for Beaver Stadium and football. It's less likely that people think of the other Penn States - the branch campuses. Technically, they are the same university...but perception is different.

    Although main campuses may offer more activities, different classes and a completely different lifestyle than branch campuses, it doesn't necessarily mean one is better than the other. In fact, there are benefits of branch campuses that students should consider before attending the main campus.

    First, branches are smaller and offer students a closer experience with professors and students. If students prefer one-on-one connections with their professors and classmates where everybody knows each other's names, branches can offer this. This can also make for an easier transition for students coming from smaller high schools.

    Second, some branches are completely different from the main. Some branches specialize in specific majors – a benefit for students in those majors. (For example, UConn's Avery Point campus in Groton offers specialization for marine sciences.) Another example of this is branch campuses outside of the country. Unlike study abroad, the student will not be attending a different college and earning transfer credits toward their university: They will be attending their school branched overseas, like Carnegie Mellon's branch in Qatar. Another benefit? Experiencing college abroad can be cheaper than study abroad!

    Third, regardless of attending a branch or main, all of the diplomas (at least at most schools) will say the same thing. Even though I attend UPJ, my diploma will read "graduate of the University of Pittsburgh." This can provide an automatic boost to students who may think attending the branch will negate the rest of their resume.

    The last benefit of attending a branch campus is even if students do not plan to attend the branch campus for all four years, transferring credits will be easier. By staying within the same university system, students are less likely lose any credits because most classes at a branch campus are at the main campus.

    Although branch campuses are not for every student, they are certainly something to consider!

    And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (5)

    by Suada Kolovic

    I'm sure you've heard the age old adage "It's never too late to earn your college degree." And for Ingeborg Syllm-Rapoport, those words rang true: Nearly eight decades after not being allowed to defend her doctoral thesis under Nazis because she was part-Jewish, the 102-year-old Syllm-Rapoport became Germany's oldest recipient of a doctorate on Tuesday.

    Syllm-Rapoport, a retired neonatologist, submitted her thesis to the University of Hamburg in 1938, five years after Adolf Hitler took power. When she handed in her doctorate thesis, her supervisor at the time, Rudolf Degkwitz, wrote in a letter in 1938 that he would have accepted her work on diphtheria if it hadn't been for the Nazis' race laws which, he said, "make it impossible to allow Miss Syllm's admission for the doctorate." "For me personally, the degree didn't mean anything, but to support the great goal of coming to terms with history — I wanted to be part of that," Syllm-Rapoport told German public television station NDR. (For more on this story, head over to the Wall Street Journal.)

    Share your thoughts on Syllm-Rapoport’s inspiring story below.

    And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (2)

    by Suada Kolovic

    Due to the stagnant economy, students are flocking to majors considered "safe" (economics, engineering and computer science) and steering clear of ones that develop creative thinking and imagination (the humanities). It makes sense: The objective after graduation is to obtain a lucrative career to pay for that prestigious college education and the best way to do that is to select a major where the potential for a generous return on your investment is high. Interestingly enough, that same thought process applied to some of our favorite A-listers way back when they were considering college majors! Don’t believe us? Check out some of the more surprisingly "safe" majors chosen by celebrities below:

    If you’re struggling with choosing a major, head over to Scholarships.com’s College Prep section for tips on things to consider before making a definite decision. And while you’re there, we invite you to do a free college scholarship search to find financial aid opportunities that are tailored to you!

    And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (1)

    by Suada Kolovic

    There have been countless movie and television show plots surrounding different forms of academic dishonestly but in real life, cheating is more common than you think...even at Ivy League institutions.

    According to an annual survey of graduating seniors by the Harvard Crimson newspaper, roughly 20 percent of the students surveyed said they had cheated in their studies while at Harvard. Of those who reported cheating, 90 percent did so on a problem set or homework assignment, 27 percent on a paper or take-home exam and 30 percent on an in-class exam. The survey also found that recruited athletes were about twice as likely to have said that they cheated as the rest of the class, as were members of male final clubs. So how many of that 20 percent have been reprimanded or placed on academic probation? Not many: Only 5 percent of graduating seniors reported having been caught been the Administrative Board for any type of disciplinary issue. (For more on this surveys’ findings, head over to the Harvard Crimson.)

    What's being done at your school to limit academic dishonesty? Do you have any suggestions on how to make these methods more effective? Share your thoughts in the comments section.

    Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (70)

    by Suada Kolovic

    After nearly 100 years, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will rename Saunders Hall – named for a 19th-century Ku Klux Klan leader – to Carolina Hall. All together now: It’s about time!

    Following years of activism by students, UNC-Chapel Hill announced the name change on Thursday. "These efforts to curate the campus and teach the past with greater context will present future generations with a more accurate, complete and accessible understanding of Carolina's history," said Dr. Lowry Caudill, chairman of the board of trustees. Curious as to why the building was named after Saunders in the first place? He was an alum of the UNC class of 1854 and served as North Carolina's Secretary of State from 1879 to 1891; when the building was named for Saunders in 1920, trustees cited his leadership in the KKK as one of his credentials. (In their announcement on Thursday, the current trustees said their predecessors were wrong to have used that as a qualification.)

    Share your thoughts on UNC-Chapel Hill's decision to finally rename the building in the comments section.

    And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (2)

    Is Harvard Biased Against Asian American Applicants?

    Complaint Alleges University Sets Higher Bar to Limit Asian Enrollment

    May 19, 2015

    by Suada Kolovic

    Applying to some of the top universities in the country is undoubtedly unnerving given the quality of the applicants and the impossibly low acceptance rates. But what if because you were an Asian-American student seeking admission, you were held to an even higher standard? Well, that is what a coalition of 64 organizations is claiming.

    According to the compliant, which was filed with the U.S. Education Department's Office for Civil Rights, Harvard University set quotas to keep the numbers of Asian-American students significantly lower than the quality of their application merits. It cites third-party academic research on the SAT exam showing that Asian-Americans have to score on average about 140 points higher than white students, 270 points higher than Hispanic students and 450 points higher than African-American students to equal their chances of gaining admission. "Many studies have indicated that Harvard University has been engaged in systemic and continuous discrimination against Asian-Americans during its very subjective 'holistic' college admissions process," the complaint alleges. The coalition is seeking a federal investigation and is requesting Harvard “immediately cease and desist from using stereotypes, racial biases and other discriminatory means in evaluating Asian-American applicants.” (For updates on this story, check out the Wall Street Journal.)

    What are your thoughts on Harvard’s admission process? Share your opinions in the comments section.

    And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (63)

    by Suada Kolovic

    Understanding how to negotiate your salary is a skill that you’ll hone over your career. Normally, many new employees want to negotiate for higher salaries...but for some, that's not always the case: Incoming University of Texas at Austin President Gregory Fenves turned down a $1 million salary because he thought it was too much. Say what?

    According to the Austin American-Statesman, Fenves said (in emails obtained by the newspaper) that a $1 million salary was "too high for a public university" and that it might prompt "widespread negative attention from student and faculty given the difficult budgetary constraints of the past five years." Instead, he requested a salary of $750,000 and requested that an annual bonus be capped at 10 percent of his base salary. "It's very, very unusual, especially with what's going on today with presidential salaries. They keep going up and up and up," said James Finkelstein, a public policy professor at George Mason University who studies executive compensation in higher education. (For more on this story, check out Inside Higher Ed.)

    What do you think of Fenves' decision to request a lower salary? Should more college presidents follow in his footsteps? Share your thoughts in the comments section.

    And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (7)

    by Suada Kolovic

    Immigration disputes have long commanded top billing when it comes to our nation’s political agenda but as of late, it's begun seeping into the educational realm as well: Immigrants who were brought to the United States illegally by their parents will qualify for in-state tuition at colleges in the University of Arizona system, the Board of Regents decided on Thursday.

    According to reports, the decision from Superior Court Judge Arthur Anderson comes in a lawsuit files by former Attorney General Tom Horne against the Maricopa County Community College District. "Federal law, not state law, determines who is lawfully present in the U.S.," Anderson wrote. "The state cannot establish subcategories of 'lawful presence,' picking and choosing when it will consider DACA recipients lawfully present and when it will not." The judge’s ruling will set a precedent for Maricopa County only but could help back up arguments by other colleges. (For more on this story, head over to The Chronicle.)

    Do you support Arizona's decision or oppose it? Share your thoughts in the comments section.

    Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (6)

    by Suada Kolovic

    A University of South Carolina student is facing felony charges and possible jail time after a hidden camera allegedly caught her spitting and pouring cleaning fluid into her roommates' food.

    According to police, 22-year-old Hayley King can be seen in the video – recorded on February 4th – spitting and pouring Windex into multiple containers of food in the off-campus apartment she shared with two roommates. According to Columbia Police Department incident report, King’s roommates set up the camera after "multiple altercations" with the suspect caused them to fear what she was doing when they were not home. They tried to get King to move out because of said altercations but she refused. Police arrested King on February 9th after her roommates showed authorities the video. After reviewing the footage, police called King in for an interview, where she later confessed to the incident. She has been charged with unlawful, malicious tampering with human drug product or food – a Class C felony carrying a term of up to 20 years in prison, if convicted. She was released a day after her arrest on a $5,000 personal recognizance bond.

    Do you think King should face the maximum sentence of 20 years in prison? Share your thoughts in the comments section. For more information on roommates and communal living, check out our Campus Life section.

    And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (180)

    by Suada Kolovic

    Standardized testing is as much – if not more – a part of the college process as tweeting your acceptance, Snapchatting your new roomies and buying a shower caddy...or at least it used to be: According to reports, there is a growing trend toward test-optional admissions. What does that mean? If a student decided to apply to a test-optional institution, they can choose whether or not to submit ACT/SAT scores as part of their application. Thinking about signing up? Don’t shred your test prep materials into confetti just yet; here are some things to consider, courtesy of Time Magazine:

    • Your academic record: When admissions counselors evaluates a test-optional application, they pay particular attention to grades and the difficulty of the completed curriculum. Students who excel in AP, dual-enrollment, honors and IB courses – and who have the high marks to prove it – may find that test-optional admissions is particularly well suited to them.
    • Your exam history: If your exam results do not reflect your marks on most other academic tasks, test-optional admissions may be right for you.
    • Your prospective schools: Consider the colleges and universities to which you plan on applying. How many of these schools offer test-optional admissions? If even one school requires a standardized exam, it may be worth submitting your scores to every prospective college on your list.
    • Your financial aid prospects: Some academic institutions and outside organizations require ACT/SAT results as part of their decision-making process. Before you commit yourself to test-optional admissions, research the criteria for any grants or scholarships that appeal to you. If test-optional admissions will limit any needed financial aid, it may be best to follow a more traditional admissions path.

    Do you think the test-optional admissions practice is the way of the future? What do you think is a better barometer of qualified applicants: test scores or essays? Share your thoughts in the comments section. And don't forget to try and fund your education with as much free money as possible – a great place to start is by visiting Scholarships.com and conducting a free college scholarship search where you'll get matched with scholarships, grants and other financial aid opportunities that are unique to you!

    And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

    Comments (2)

    << < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>
    Page 3 of 63

    Recent Posts

    Tags

    ACT (20)
    Advanced Placement (24)
    Alumni (17)
    Applications (90)
    Athletics (17)
    Back To School (80)
    Books (67)
    Campus Life (473)
    Career (115)
    Choosing A College (65)
    College (1044)
    College Admissions (257)
    College And Society (348)
    College And The Economy (384)
    College Applications (152)
    College Benefits (295)
    College Budgets (220)
    College Classes (451)
    College Costs (506)
    College Culture (626)
    College Goals (391)
    College Grants (55)
    College In Congress (91)
    College Life (598)
    College Majors (228)
    College News (635)
    College Prep (169)
    College Savings Accounts (19)
    College Scholarships (165)
    College Search (122)
    College Students (511)
    College Tips (134)
    Community College (59)
    Community Service (40)
    Community Service Scholarships (28)
    Course Enrollment (19)
    Economy (122)
    Education (29)
    Education Study (30)
    Employment (42)
    Essay Scholarship (39)
    FAFSA (55)
    Federal Aid (102)
    Finances (71)
    Financial Aid (419)
    Financial Aid Information (61)
    Financial Aid News (59)
    Financial Tips (41)
    Food (45)
    Food/Cooking (28)
    GPA (80)
    Grades (91)
    Graduate School (56)
    Graduate Student Scholarships (21)
    Graduate Students (65)
    Graduation Rates (38)
    Grants (63)
    Health (38)
    High School (135)
    High School News (78)
    High School Student Scholarships (186)
    High School Students (322)
    Higher Education (115)
    Internships (526)
    Job Search (179)
    Just For Fun (122)
    Loan Repayment (41)
    Loans (50)
    Military (16)
    Money Management (134)
    Online College (21)
    Pell Grant (29)
    President Obama (25)
    Private Colleges (34)
    Private Loans (20)
    Roommates (100)
    SAT (23)
    Scholarship Applications (169)
    Scholarship For Women (16)
    Scholarship Information (186)
    Scholarship Of The Week (278)
    Scholarship Search (226)
    Scholarship Tips (92)
    Scholarships (411)
    Sports (63)
    Sports Scholarships (22)
    Stafford Loans (24)
    Standardized Testing (46)
    State Colleges (43)
    State News (36)
    Student Debt (86)
    Student Life (514)
    Student Loans (142)
    Study Abroad (68)
    Study Skills (215)
    Teachers (95)
    Technology (111)
    Tips (514)
    Transfer Scholarship (17)
    Tuition (93)
    Undergraduate Scholarships (37)
    Undergraduate Students (155)
    Volunteer (45)
    Work And College (83)
    Work Study (20)
    Writing Scholarship (19)

    Categories

    529 Plan (2)
    Back To School (392)
    College And The Economy (591)
    College Applications (281)
    College Budgets (379)
    College Classes (604)
    College Costs (865)
    College Culture (1040)
    College Grants (159)
    College In Congress (164)
    College Life (1096)
    College Majors (357)
    College News (1087)
    College Savings Accounts (59)
    College Search (405)
    Coverdell (1)
    FAFSA (126)
    Federal Aid (160)
    Fellowships (25)
    Financial Aid (754)
    Food/Cooking (80)
    GPA (282)
    Graduate School (110)
    Grants (81)
    High School (587)
    High School News (270)
    Housing (178)
    Internships (580)
    Just For Fun (256)
    Press Releases (25)
    Roommates (148)
    Scholarship Applications (279)
    Scholarship Of The Week (405)
    Scholarships (712)
    Sports (81)
    Standardized Testing (62)
    Student Loans (234)
    Study Abroad (65)
    Tips (873)
    Uncategorized (7)
    Virtual Intern (571)