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Don’t Avoid Drama in College – Embrace It!

Why You Should Consider Participating in College Theatre

June 22, 2011

Don’t Avoid Drama in College – Embrace It!

by Thomas Lee

I first began theatre in high school playing the role of Mr. Gibbs in the play “Arsenic and Old Lace” and then I was an extra in “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers.” In college, I did not necessarily plan to perform theatre since I was a political science major but I auditioned my freshman year because I couldn’t resist the allure.

I ended up playing some country hick in a skit play called “Talking With...And Moving On” and appeared on stage again as an extra in the spring musical “The Robber Bridegroom.” In my junior year, I was an extra in a musical about evangelist John Wesley called “Ride! Ride!” This production was particularly time consuming and contributed nothing to my major; after the show ended, so did my college theatre career.

Even though I was a political science major, I had always found the stage interesting and mainly auditioned for roles for the fun of it. I did gain some experience in stage construction, time management skills and, of course, performance. I also received one semester hour of theatre class credit for my first freshman role.

College theatre can be an enthralling experience even if you are not a theatre, performing arts or music major. The key is to know if the time necessary for stage practice will cut too much into class or study time. I learned how to better manage my studying and homework, as I had to schedule it around rehearsal.

If you are considering becoming involved in all that college drama, here are a few guidelines:

  1. Always be early to practice.
  2. Always pay attention to instructions.
  3. Always take part in stage construction and destruction.
  4. If you plan to quit, quit early.
  5. Make sure practice doesn’t ruin your grades.

If you can abide by these simple rules, then maybe you’re ready for the art of the stage!

Thomas Lee recently graduated from Methodist University in Fayetteville, North Carolina with a BA in political science and journalism. His father is an ordained Church of God minister and his mother is a private school teacher; he also has two younger sisters. Thomas’ interests include politics, law, debate, global issues and writing fiction and he believes in a personal relationship to Jesus Christ and a strong commitment to biblical morality and ethics. He currently resides in Washington, North Carolina and will be attending law school in the near future.

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Campus Creepers

Who Are the "Interesting" Characters at Your School?

June 22, 2011

Campus Creepers

by Katie Askew

One of the joys of going to a public college in a very urban setting is the abundance of culture, business and interesting people — and the University of Minnesota definitely does not lack in the interesting people category. We have our very own well-known and well-loved campus creeper!

His name is Mike Gould, a man that stands upon a 10-foot ladder in the middle of our giant main courtyard area (“The Mall”) every school day in the fall, spring and summer semesters. Mike has rarely missed a day of shouting to the thousands of passersby as he reads passages from the Bible. Through rain, shine, sleet or 24 inches of Minnesota snow, he is there. His psychological status has yet to be determined but his main objective is to bring the word of God to thousands of Minnesota students. He sometimes aids his sermons with hymn-like songs played on an acoustic guitar. Every student that attends the U of M knows about Mike; there is even a Facebook group focusing on Mike Gould that helps to bond the students with stories, photos and events. It’s even rumored that Mike is attempting to run for mayor of Minneapolis. Good luck, Mike!

The University of Minnesota isn’t the only campus out there with a special addition to their student body. My friends at the University of Nebraska – Lincoln tell me they have “Crazy Blue Protesting Lady” running around their campus. She, too, has her own Facebook group where students document their sightings of and encounters with the woman always completely dressed in blue.

The harmless campus creepers tend to bring the collective student body together — it’s great! Does your campus have a creeper? If so, we’d love to hear about it!

Katie Askew is a freshman at the University of Minnesota pursuing degrees in journalism and English. At school, Katie can be found reading, drumming or working in the Office of Admissions. Outside of school, she enjoys traveling, performing or teaching music and spending time outdoors with friends and family. Katie loves all things zebra and has a necessary addiction to coffee. Her iPod is perpetually playing Death Cab for Cutie or classical music because she truly believes that when words fail, music speaks.

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Food Awareness in College

How the USDA’s MyPlate Guide Can Help You Eat Right at School

June 23, 2011

Food Awareness in College

by Aaron Lin

Eating in college brings a slew of questions. Are you going to have enough meals? Will you gain the Freshman 15 from dining hall food? Even with all the dining opportunities on campus, there are some foods that are easy to keep in your dorm room or apartment for quick snacks or healthy meals.

The USDA’s MyPlate (the replacement for the food pyramid many are used to) shows a few important ideas about proper diet. It’s in the shape of a plate and is divided into rough fourths, with each fourth representing one food group – fruits, grains, protein and vegetables plus a cup for the dairy group. The new diagram is all about good knowledge, good decisions and portion control. Keeping this in mind, here are a few foods that I’ve personally found last a while in the dorms and are generally healthy, too.

Fruits: Dried fruits are the way to go here. Coveted by hikers and endurance runners, raisins pack a natural sugar punch and don’t go bad in a matter of days. Try dried cranberries or banana chips, too.

Grains: I love the taste of whole wheat tortillas and bread. Go with whole grain or wheat because multi-grain is not the same thing.

Protein: Protein is either animal- or plant-based. Some research shows that the plant-based kind is more easily absorbed so spread some peanut and cashew butter on bread or crackers!

Vegetables: Celery and baby carrots are both long lasting in the refrigerator. Celery tastes great with peanut butter and baby carrots are good with pretty much any dipping sauce. Steam carrots up in the microwave with a bowl and a bit of water or keep some folic acid-rich leafy greens like baby spinach handy, too.

Dairy: It’s tough if you don’t have a fridge but plain yogurt is packed with digestive-aiding probiotics.

Aaron Lin is a chemistry major at Louisiana State University but has plans to transfer to LSU Health Sciences Center in New Orleans to pursue a clinical laboratory science degree and further feed his interest in the application of scientific and medical knowledge. In his free time, Aaron likes to eat food, read and write about food, exercise to work off that food and play the occasional computer game. He also enjoys footbiking, running and Frisbee.

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Attending College Away vs. In-State

June 24, 2011

Attending College Away vs. In-State

by Darci Miller

When I first began looking at colleges, I knew right away that I didn’t want to attend school locally. I wanted to forge my own way away from home and none of New York’s state schools really interested me. I did apply to one in-state school (Syracuse) that’s a multiple hour drive away from home but ended up not going there.

Starting at Miami was a bit of a culture shock. I went from seeing familiar faces everywhere in high school to being the one solitary Baldwinite at college. There are several others from my high school at Miami but they’re older than me and we’ve never interacted before. I was entirely on my own. My friends, on the other hand, moved on from high school in a very different way: Almost everybody I know attends college with at least one other person from high school and SUNY Binghamton is now the home of more than 20 members of my graduating class, many of whom now live together.

Sometimes, I’m a little bit jealous. If vacation days don’t line up, I’ll be sitting in my dorm room reading Facebook updates about how everyone’s getting together back at home – people can’t afford to fly down to Miami to visit one friend but they can afford to drive to Binghamton to visit dozens of them – but embarking on a college journey miles away from home does have its positives.

By going to school away, you’ll get to miss out on all the stupid high school drama inherent in high school friendships. You’ll be able to make an entirely new group of friends without worrying about what your old friends think of you or of them. You can reinvent yourself entirely if you want to, become your own person and return home new, improved and blissfully unaware of who kissed who and who now hates who. Trust me, you won’t miss it!

Darci Miller is a New Yorker studying journalism and sport administration at the University of Miami. When she’s not writing for the school newspaper, you can find her at the gym, either working or working out. She loves all ‘80s pop culture (the cheesier the better!), and glues herself to her TV when the Olympics are on. She dreams big, and believes the sky’s the limit!

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Catholic University’s Single-Sex Dorm Reform

June 24, 2011

Catholic University’s Single-Sex Dorm Reform

by Anna Meskishvili

Last week, Catholic University president John Garvey announced that beginning with this upcoming academic year, all dormitories would be single-sex. The university based this decision on reported studies that students living in co-ed environments are more likely to engage in binge drinking as well as hooking up.

Garvey emphasizes that within co-ed environments, gender roles get blurred and women try to “outdrink” men, which can only lead to harmful situations. From reckless drinking comes reckless behavior such as unprotected sex, which is more easily accessible in a co-ed dorm. If his changes are instituted, Garvey claims this is all less likely to occur.

This change in housing is not passing without some strong opposition. John F. Banzhaf, a law professor at George Washington University, claims that this may even be illegal because it violates the District of Columbia’s Human Rights Act, which prohibits discrimination in housing based on sex, race, religion and other factors.

Through my own experience living in single-sex and co-ed dorms, I can tell you that boys will be boys and girls will be girls. No matter what environment you place 300 18-year-olds in, they will be as reckless as they choose to be. In fact, as stated in a CNN article about the matter, many women do their heaviest drinking while with other women and boys tend to “bro-out” with their guy friends and binge drink; therefore, separating the two groups will likely not change their initiative to engage in alcohol consumption.

From my experience living in an all-girls dorm, all the female interaction leads to cliques, cattiness and bullying; this is much less likely to occur when there are boys present to dilute the female egos. Being in single-sex dorms makes it harder to branch out and ultimately does not benefit the students living there. What do you think? Do you think that eliminating common ground between boys and girls in dorms will eliminate the problems Garvey cites, too?

Anna Meskishvili is a rising senior at Boston University pursuing a degree in public relations at the College of Communication and hopes to someday work in healthcare administration communication. She is part of Kappa Delta at BU and has loved every second of it. She is also involved in Public Relations Student Society of America and Ed on Campus. Anna was born in the Republic of Georgia and considers herself a citizen of the world because she’s lived in Russia, England, France, Brooklyn and Connecticut. She loves to travel, run and learn.

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Three Books Every Student Should Read Before College

June 24, 2011

Three Books Every Student Should Read Before College

by Jacquelene Bennett

Soon-to-be college students, be warned: You’ll be doing a lot of reading and writing during your postsecondary education. From the moment you start to the moment you finish, you will read until your eyes bulge out and write until your fingers are numb. That being said, I can see how the thought of reading during your summer vacation may be unpleasant but you’ll soon realize the most successful and active college students share one thing in common: They are all well-read.

Now it is not necessary for you to read the entire Library of Congress before school starts but I’ve gone and listed three books that I think are important for all students to read before starting college.

These aren’t the only books you should read but they are definitely among the most important ones. Grab copies at your local library or bookstore and enjoy!

Jacquelene Bennett is a rising senior at the University of Redlands where her areas of study are creative writing, government and religious studies. When she is not studying or working, you can usually find her eating frozen yogurt or blogging about her day. She has a cactus named Kat and believes that Stephen Colbert is a genius. Jacquelene works hard, laughs hard and knows that one day you’ll see her name in lights.

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Social Media and Your College Life

June 27, 2011

Social Media and Your College Life

by Angela Andaloro

As embarrassing as it is to admit, one of the coolest parts of selecting your school is telling everyone you know. A school hoodie used to be announcement enough but now, one of the first questions incoming freshmen ask is how they can find out their new school email – a requirement to add their school on Facebook.

Social media is an excellent outlet for communication between freshmen, students and administration, and even students and peer leaders. Many students who live on campus “meet” their roommates for the first time via Facebook. Students can also follow their schools on Twitter, as well as accounts designated for various clubs and organizations. With so many benefits, why wouldn’t college students look to social media as a way to jumpstart their college social lives?

The answer to that is simple: overexposure. Students forget just how open the Internet is. No matter how iron-clad you believe your privacy settings are, the information is out there to be passed around. Many students are concerned about this when it comes to photos, and rightly so – they are often warned of the dangers of posting sexually suggestive images, pictures of parties with illegal activities going on and other questionable material – but there are other ways social media can get students in trouble. Students have been known to voice their comments and complaints about teachers, classes and administration via social networking sites in recent years. When such complaints turn into rants and get out of hand, the administration takes action.

With such a delicate balance between helpful and harmful, how should a student handle social media? I believe in one rule: use social media for communication, not broadcasting. Social media can be great to communicate, ask questions and answer questions. Broadcasting your feelings and not expecting something to occur as a result, however, is unwise.

How do you keep your social media use safe and enjoyable?

Angela Andaloro is a rising junior at Pace University’s New York City campus, where she is double majoring in communication studies and English. Like most things in New York City, her life and college experience is far from typical – she commutes to school from her home in Flushing and took nearly a semester’s worth of classes online – but she still likes to hang out with friends, go to parties and feed her social networking addiction like your “average” college student.

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There’s No Place Like Home...or Is There?

June 30, 2011

There’s No Place Like Home...or Is There?

by Jessica Seals

During my freshman year of college, I seized every opportunity to go home and visit friends and family. Although I only live an hour away from campus, I looked forward to going home to catch up on how different life was now that I was technically no longer living there. As time went on, however, I noticed that I stopped going home as often as I did during my freshman year and so did all of my friends.

By the time my junior year rolled around, I had grown accustomed to being in Memphis and treating school as my home. Many of my friends had gotten their own apartments or rented houses and had made the cities where their schools were home as well. Now when I go home to visit, I am usually the only person who decides to do so; we have all gotten older, learned how to be independent and are starting to live our own lives separate from our parents. Now I am lucky if I can catch my friends when I can and we rely on setting up gatherings via Facebook even more than before.

The decline in the number of times everyone ventures home shows just how much going away to college can allow you to explore things on your own and branch out to experience things outside your hometown. I personally feel more independent and even closer to completely growing up and being on my own.

Jessica Seals is currently a senior at the University of Memphis majoring in political science and minoring in English. At the University of Memphis, she is the secretary of the Pre-Law Society, the philanthropy chair of the Phi Kappa Phi Student Council and a member of Professional Assertive United Sisters of Excellence (PAUSE), Golden Key Honor Society, Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society, Sigma Alpha Lambda Honor Society, and Black Scholars Unlimited. She also volunteers to tutor her fellow classmates and hopes to attend law school in the near future.

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The Benefits of Digital Textbooks

July 1, 2011

The Benefits of Digital Textbooks

by Lisa Lowdermilk

Does your back ache from carrying heavy textbooks from class to class? Do you hate paying extra money for priority shipping to ensure you get your textbooks in time for the new semester? If you answered yes to either one of these questions, you may be interested to know many websites now offer textbooks digitally.

Sites like Chegg.com, Textbooks.com and Cengagebrain.com offer dozens of e-books to accommodate your e-reading needs. You don't need to go out and buy an e-reading device such as Amazon's Kindle or Sony's Reader (you can read e-books right on your computer screen) and you never have to worry about losing your e-books because if your computer or e-reader is misplaced or stolen, all you need to do is download the e-text again.

Even with all these benefits, I know some of you may still be reluctant to go digital because you think you won't be able to highlight pages or navigate a digital text easily. Well, put those fears to rest: Many e-books allow you to highlight specific words or phrases, make notes in the margins and even search the entire e-book for a specific word or phrase.

Finally, you can rent e-books just like you can rent traditional books. Normally when you rent textbooks, you have to worry about water damage, torn pages and shipping your books back on time but not so with e-books! When your rental period is up, the e-text simply expires with no fines for damages or shipping incurred. If after using all these features, you decide you still prefer having your text on paper after all, you can print out whichever pages you specify.

So consider going digital, if only just for one class. I guarantee you (and your back and your wallet) won't regret it!

Lisa Lowdermilk is a published poet, avid video gamer and artist. Her poems have appeared in Celebrate Young Poets: West (Fall 2006) edition and Widener University's The Blue Route. She enjoys watching thrillers, trying different restaurants and attempting to breakdance. Lisa is now majoring in professional writing at the University of Colorado Denver.

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College Challenges and How to Overcome Them

July 5, 2011

College Challenges and How to Overcome Them

by Thomas Lee

The practical hassles of everyday life can become a problem for college students used to living at home. I learned this the hard way my freshman year when simple tasks like doing the laundry became a chore.

My freshman dorm only had two washers and dryers per hallway. A week’s worth of laundry quickly became an insurmountable pile because I couldn’t find a free washer. My parents suggested using a Laundromat but that costs extra money which a student may or may not have. The trick was for me to pick a specific time of the week where the laundry room would be mostly free and stick to it. Washing on Sunday afternoon when most students were not in the dorm became my weekly ritual.

The most difficult part of day-to-day college life for me was car trouble. Throughout all four years, gasoline prices were roughly around $3 a gallon and today show no signs of dropping. If you have a car on campus, the best thing you can do is hope to get a decent paying job and minimize your driving to only what is necessary. Another option is establishing a good network of friends and carpooling to save both time and money. Another major cost for me was car repair. I shelled out hundreds of dollars for a single repair, as well as an incident in which I was towed after having a flat tire. One rule of thumb (although this may differ by region) is to hook a white t-shirt or plastic bag to your window if your car breaks down as a distress signal to avoid towing for two days.

The best general advice I can give for college life is make smart, rational, common sense decisions. And don’t give in to peer pressure. But perhaps that is a story for another time.

Thomas Lee recently graduated from Methodist University in Fayetteville, North Carolina with a BA in political science and journalism. His father is an ordained Church of God minister and his mother is a private school teacher; he also has two younger sisters. Thomas’ interests include politics, law, debate, global issues and writing fiction and he believes in a personal relationship to Jesus Christ and a strong commitment to biblical morality and ethics. He currently resides in Washington, North Carolina and will be attending law school in the near future.

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